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Auteur Brouwer, G.M.; Duijnstee, I. a. P.; Hazeleger, J.H.; Rossi, F.; Lourens, L.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Wolthers, M.
Titre Diet shifts and population dynamics of estuarine foraminifera during ecosystem recovery after experimentally induced hypoxia crises Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume 170 Numéro Pages 20-33
Mots-Clés Bacteria; Benthic foraminifera; C-13 label; communities; Diet shifts; differential response; diversity; Hypoxia; in-situ; Intertidal; Macrofauna; Meiofauna; microphytobenthos carbon; population dynamics; Sediment
Résumé This study shows foraminiferal dynamics after experimentally induced hypoxia within the wider context of ecosystem recovery. C-13-labeled bicarbonate and glucose were added to the sediments to examine foraminiferal diet shifts during ecosystem recovery and test-size measurements were used to deduce population dynamics. Hypoxia-treated and undisturbed patches were compared to distinguish natural (seasonal) fluctuations from hypoxia-induced responses. The effect of timing of disturbance and duration of recovery were investigated. The foraminiferal diets and population dynamics showed higher fluctuations in the recovering patches compared to the controls. The foraminiferal diet and population structure of Haynesina germanica and Ammonia beccarii responded differentially and generally inversely to progressive stages of ecosystem recovery. Tracer inferred diet estimates in April and June and the two distinctly visible cohorts in the test-size distribution, discussed to reflect reproduction in June, strongly suggest that the ample availability of diatoms during the first month of ecosystem recovery after the winter hypoxia was likely profitable to A. beccarii. Enhanced reproduction itself was strongly linked to the subsequent dietary shift to bacteria. The distribution of the test dimensions of H. germanica indicated that this species had less fluctuation in population structure during ecosystem recovery but possibly reproduced in response to the induced winter hypoxia. Bacteria seemed to consistently contribute more to the diet of H. germanica than diatoms. For the diet and test-size distribution of both species, the timing of disturbance seemed to have a higher impact than the duration of the subsequent recovery period. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2065
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Auteur Leruste, A.; Villeger, S.; Malet, N.; De Wit, R.; Bec, B.
Titre Complementarity of the multidimensional functional and the taxonomic approaches to study phytoplankton communities in three Mediterranean coastal lagoons of different trophic status Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia
Volume 815 Numéro 1 Pages 207-227
Mots-Clés classification; Classification; disturbance; diversity; ecology; Functional entity; Functional traits; lake phytoplankton; marine-phytoplankton; patterns; size; synechococcus; Taxonomic diversity; traits
Résumé We used the individual-based multidimensional functional diversity and the taxonomic approaches in a complementary way to describe phytoplankton communities in three coastal lagoons with different eutrophication status in the South of France. We sampled communities during three seasons, i.e., in autumn, spring, and summer. Using classical taxonomy, 107 taxa/morphotypes were identified in the nine communities. The individual-based functional approach allowed grouping these individuals into 20 functional entities according to their values for 5 traits related to trophic adaptations (cell size, mobility, trophic regime, coloniality, and pelagic/benthic life). Some species (e.g., Prorocentrum micans) emerged in multiple functional entities, showing the importance to consider intraspecific variability. The functional description of phytoplankton communities better reflected the hydrological functioning and the different eutrophication status of the lagoons than the taxonomic approach. Specific functional adaptations were identified in the nine communities. For example, phytoplankton organisms with heterotrophic and potentially mixotrophic abilities occurred when the availability of inorganic nutrient decreased, or when organic matter and small preys were potentially the main nutrient resources. The limitation has also favored small cells highly competitive for nutrients. Using functional indices together with taxonomic description has also helped revealing important aspects of community assembly, such as competitive exclusion in summer.
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ISSN 0018-8158 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2322
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Auteur Legras, G.; Loiseau, N.; Gaertner, J.-C.
Titre Functional richness: Overview of indices and underlying concepts Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Acta Oecol.-Int. J. Ecol.
Volume 87 Numéro Pages 34-44
Mots-Clés biodiversity; community composition; diversity indexes; ecology; ecosystem processes; fish communities; Functional richness indices; Guidelines; Index properties; intraspecific trait variation; Limitations; phylogenetic diversity; species richness; variability
Résumé Functional richness, currently defined as the amount of niche space occupied by the species within a community, is one of the three major components of functional diversity. Different indices have been developed in order to quantify this component. However, the range of indices available for assessing functional richness, often mathematically complex and based on different rationales, can cause confusion for field ecologists and lead to misinterpretation of the results obtained. In this context, we have provided the first study exclusively focused on the comparison of the definitions, advantages and drawbacks of a large set of functional richness indices. The first part of this work is focused on four indices (FDP&G, FRic, TOP and N-hypervolumes indices) that are currently the most commonly used for assessing functional richness. We have completed our study by including recently developed indices that enable us to take into account the intraspecific trait variability (i.e. FRim index and TDP framework), because there is currently a growing scientific consensus regarding the necessity of including this aspect in the assessment of the functional diversity of communities. We demonstrate that although authors have argued that their index describes the functional richness, each of them describes only part of it, and this part may strongly differ from one index to another. Rather than advocating the general use of a single index and/or systematically avoiding others, our study highlights the need for selecting indices in close relation with the context, the available data and the aims of each study. Such a strategy is an essential preliminary step for preventing misunderstanding and artefactual controversies. Along these lines, we propose some guidelines to help users in selecting the most appropriate indices according both to the facet of functional richness on which they wish to focus and to the characteristics of the available data.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2323
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Auteur Bettarel, Y.; Halary, S.; Auguet, J.-C.; Mai, T.C.; Bui, N.V.; Bouvier, T.; Got, P.; Bouvier, C.; Monteil-Bouchard, S.; Christelle, D.
Titre Corallivory and the microbial debacle in two branching scleractinians Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Isme J.
Volume 12 Numéro 4 Pages 1109-1126
Mots-Clés brown band disease; coral-associated bacteria; diversity; drupella-cornus; great-barrier-reef; network analysis; red-sea; search tool; viral communities; viruses
Résumé The grazing activity by specific marine organisms represents a growing threat to the survival of many scleractinian species. For example, the recent proliferation of the corallivorous gastropod Drupella now constitutes a critical case in all South-East Asian waters. If the damaging effects caused by this marine snail on coral polyps are relatively well known, the indirect incidence of predation on coral microbial associates is still obscure and might also potentially impair coral health. In this study, we compared the main ecological traits of coral-associated bacterial and viral communities living in the mucus layer of Acropora formosa and Acropora millepora, of healthy and predated individuals (i.e., colonized by Drupella rugosa), in the Bay of Van Phong (Vietnam). Our results show a substantial impact of the gastropod on a variety of microbiological markers. Colonized corals harbored much more abundant and active epibiotic bacteria whose community composition shifted toward more pathogenic taxa (belonging to the Vibrionales, Clostridiales, Campylobacterales, and Alteromonadales orders), together with their specific phages. Viral epibionts were also greatly influenced by Drupella corallivory with spectacular modifications in their concentrations, life strategies, genotype richness, and diversity. Novel and abundant circular Rep-encoding ssDNA viruses (CRESS-DNA viruses) were detected and characterized in grazed corals and we propose that their occurrence may serve as indicator of the coral health status. Finally, our results reveal that corallivory can cause severe dysbiosis by altering virus-bacteria interactions in the mucus layer, and ultimately favoring the development of local opportunistic infections.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2325
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Auteur Brehmer, P.; Laugier, T.; Kantoussan, J.; Galgani, F.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Does coastal lagoon habitat quality affect fish growth rate and their recruitment? Insights from fishing and acoustic surveys Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume 126 Numéro Pages 1-6
Mots-Clés Ecotoxicity; amphidromous; diversity; estuarine; exploitation; fish; habitat quality; indicators; lagoon; management; multibeam sonar; shallow water; size; target strength; thau lagoon; winter flounder
Résumé Ensuring the sustainability of fish resources necessitates understanding their interaction with coastal habitats, which is becoming ever more challenging in the context of ever increasing anthropogenic pressures. The ability of coastal lagoons, exposed to major sources of disturbance, to provide resources and suitable habitats for growth and survival of juvenile fish is especially important. We analysed three lagoons with different ecological statuses and habitat quality on the basis of their eutrophication and ecotoxicity (Trix test) levels. Fish abundances were sampled using fishing and horizontal beaming acoustic surveys with the same protocols in the same year. The relative abundance of Anguilla anguilla, Dicentrarchus labrax or the Mugilidae group was not an indicator of habitat quality, whereas Atherina boyeri and Sparus aurata appeared to be more sensitive to habitat quality. Fish abundance was higher in the two lagoons with high eutrophication and ecotoxicity levels than in the less impacted lagoon, while fish sizes were significantly higher in the two most severely impacted lagoons. This leads us to suggest low habitat quality may increase fish growth rate (by the mean of a cascading effect), but may reduce lagoon juvenile abundance by increasing larval mortality. Such a hypothesis needs to be further validated using greater investigations which take into account more influences on fish growth and recruitment in such variable environments under complex multi-stressor conditions. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 535
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