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Auteur D'agata, S.; Mouillot, D.; Wantiez, L.; Friedlander, A.M.; Kulbicki, M.; Vigliola, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Marine reserves lag behind wilderness in the conservation of key functional roles Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages 12000  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; coral-reef fishes; diversity indexes; ecosystem; new-caledonia; population-density; protected areas; species richness; visual-census; vulnerability  
  Résumé Although marine reserves represent one of the most effective management responses to human impacts, their capacity to sustain the same diversity of species, functional roles and biomass of reef fishes as wilderness areas remains questionable, in particular in regions with deep and long-lasting human footprints. Here we show that fish functional diversity and biomass of top predators are significantly higher on coral reefs located at more than 20 h travel time from the main market compared with even the oldest (38 years old), largest (17,500 ha) and most restrictive (no entry) marine reserve in New Caledonia (South-Western Pacific). We further demonstrate that wilderness areas support unique ecological values with no equivalency as one gets closer to humans, even in large and well-managed marine reserves. Wilderness areas may therefore serve as benchmarks for management effectiveness and act as the last refuges for the most vulnerable functional roles.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original (up)  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1625  
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Auteur Jeanmougin, M.; Leprieur, F.; Lois, G.; Clergeau, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Fine-scale urbanization affects Odonata species diversity in ponds of a megacity (Paris, France) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Acta Oecologica-International Journal of Ecology  
  Volume 59 Numéro Pages 26-34  
  Mots-Clés Evenness; Landscape composition; Model averaging; Ponds; Species diversity; Urban ecology; agricultural landscape; comparative biodiversity; conservation; dragonflies odonata; ecology; fresh-water habitat; patterns; richness; selection; urban  
  Résumé Current developments in urban ecology include very few studies focused on pond ecosystems, though ponds are recognized as biodiversity hotspots. Using Odonata as an indicator model, we explored changes in species composition in ponds localized along an urban gradient of a megacity (Paris, France). We then assessed the relative importance of local- and landscape-scale variables in shaping Odonata alpha-diversity patterns using a model-averaging approach. Analyses were performed for adult (A) and adult plus exuviae (AE) census data. At 26 ponds, we recorded 657 adults and 815 exuviae belonging to 17 Odonata species. The results showed that the Odonata species assemblage composition was not determined by pond localization along the urban gradient. Similarly, pond characteristics were found to be similar among urban, suburban and periurban ponds. The analyses of AE census data revealed that fine-scale urbanization (i.e., increased density of buildings surrounding ponds) negatively affects Odonata alpha-diversity. In contrast, pond localization along the urban gradient weakly explained the alpha-diversity patterns. Several local-scale variables, such as the coverage of submerged macrophytes, were found to be significant drivers of Odonata alpha-diversity. Together, these results show that the degree of urbanization around ponds must be considered instead of pond localization along the urban gradient when assessing the potential impacts of urbanization on Odonata species diversity This work also indicates the importance of exuviae sampling in understanding the response of Odonata to urbanization. (C) 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original (up)  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 602  
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Auteur Collet, A.; Durand, J.-D.; Desmarais, E.; Cerqueira, F.; Cantinelli, T.; Valade, P.; Ponton, D. doi  openurl
  Titre DNA barcoding post-larvae can improve the knowledge about fish biodiversity: an example from La Reunion, SW Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mitochondrial DNA Part A  
  Volume 29 Numéro 6 Pages 905-918  
  Mots-Clés DNA barcoding; estimating diversity; fauna; fish larvae; ichthyoplankton; island; Mascarene Archipelago; reef; species richness  
  Résumé The aim of this study was to demonstrate that fish larvae identified using their COI sequences offer a unique opportunity for improving the knowledge of local fish richness. Fish larvae were sampled at the end of their pelagic phase using light-traps set off the West Coast of La Reunion Island, southwestern Indian Ocean, once per month from October 2014 to March 2015. Among the 5174 larvae caught, 214 morphologically different specimens were selected, 196 successfully barcoded, giving a total of 101 different Barcode Index Numbers (BINs). Among these BINs, 55 had never been recorded in La Reunion exclusive economic zone (EEZ), and 13 were new for the BOLD database. Even if the sampling effort for collecting fish post-larvae during this study was relatively low, it allowed adding at least nine new species to an updated checklist of fishes of La Reunion EEZ.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original (up)  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2470-1394 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2394  
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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics  
  Résumé AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original (up)  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627  
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Auteur Mazel, F.; Pennell, M.W.; Cadotte, M.W.; Diaz, S.; Dalla Riva, G.V.; Grenyer, R.; Leprieur, F.; Mooers, A.O.; Mouillot, D.; Tucker, C.M.; Pearse, W.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Prioritizing phylogenetic diversity captures functional diversity unreliably Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 9 Numéro Pages 2888  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; conservation priorities; dependence; ecosystems; global patterns; gradients; hotspots; mammals; plant traits; species richness  
  Résumé In the face of the biodiversity crisis, it is argued that we should prioritize species in order to capture high functional diversity (FD). Because species traits often reflect shared evolutionary history, many researchers have assumed that maximizing phylogenetic diversity (PD) should indirectly capture FD, a hypothesis that we name the “phylogenetic gambit”. Here, we empirically test this gambit using data on ecologically relevant traits from >15,000 vertebrate species. Specifically, we estimate a measure of surrogacy of PD for FD. We find that maximizing PD results in an average gain of 18% of FD relative to random choice. However, this average gain obscures the fact that in over one-third of the comparisons, maximum PD sets contain less FD than randomly chosen sets of species. These results suggest that, while maximizing PD protection can help to protect FD, it represents a risky conservation strategy.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2396  
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