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Auteur Granger, V.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Bez, N.; Relini, G.; Meynard, C.; GAERTNER, J.-C.; Maiorano, P.; Garcia Ruiz, C.; Follesa, C.; Gristina, M.; Peristeraki, P.; BRIND'AMOUR, A.; Carbonara, P.; Charilaou, C.; Esteban, A.; Jadaud, A.; Joksimovic, A.; Kallianiotis, A.; Kolitari, J.; Manfredi, C.; Massuti, E.; Mifsud, R.; Quetglas, T.; Refes, W.; Sbrana, M.; Vrgoc, N.; SPEDICATO, M.T.; Mérigot, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Large-scale spatio-temporal monitoring highlights hotspots of demersal fish diversity in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Progress in Oceanography Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 130 Numéro Pages 65-74  
  Mots-Clés Functional diversity; Phylogenetic diversity; Rao’s quadratic entropy; Regression tree; Large scale  
  Résumé Increasing human pressures and global environmental change may severely affect the diversity of species assemblages and associated ecosystem services. Despite the recent interest in phylogenetic and functional diversity, our knowledge on large spatio-temporal patterns of demersal fish diversity sampled by trawling remains still incomplete, notably in the Mediterranean Sea, one of the most threatened marine regions of the world. We investigated large spatio-temporal diversity patterns by analysing a dataset of 19,886 hauls from 10 to 800 m depth performed annually during the last two decades by standardized scientific bottom trawl field surveys across the Mediterranean Sea, within the MEDITS program. A multi-component (eight diversity indices) and multi-scale (local assemblages, biogeographic regions to basins) approach indicates that only the two most traditional components (species richness and evenness) were sufficient to reflect patterns in taxonomic, phylogenetic or functional richness and divergence. We also put into question the use of widely computed indices that allow comparing directly taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity within a unique mathematical framework. In addition, demersal fish assemblages sampled by trawl do not follow a continuous decreasing longitudinal/latitudinal diversity gradients (spatial effects explained up to 70.6% of deviance in regression tree and generalized linear models), for any of the indices and spatial scales analysed. Indeed, at both local and regional scales species richness was relatively high in the Iberian region, Malta, the Eastern Ionian and Aegean seas, meanwhile the Adriatic Sea and Cyprus showed a relatively low level. In contrast, evenness as well as taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional divergences did not show regional hotspots. All studied diversity components remained stable over the last two decades. Overall, our results highlight the need to use complementary diversity indices through different spatial scales when developing conservation strategies and defining delimitations for protected areas.  
  Adresse Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Split, Croatia  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Elsevier BV Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue (up) Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Co-auteur au Sud Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 32743 collection 980  
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Auteur Doxa, A.; Holon, F.; Deter, J.; Villeger, S.; Boissery, P.; Mouquet, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Mapping biodiversity in three-dimensions challenges marine conservation strategies: The example of coralligenous assemblages in North-Western Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 61, Part 2 Numéro Pages 1042-1054  
  Mots-Clés Alpha diversity; Beta diversity; Community dissimilarities; Coralligenous outcrops; French Mediterranean coast; Marine conservation; Multi-facet diversities; Vertical diversity  
  Résumé Multi-facet diversity indices have been increasingly widely used in conservation ecology but congruence analyses both on horizontal and vertical axes have not yet been explored. We investigated the vertical and horizontal distributions of α and β taxonomic (TD), functional (FD) and phylogenetic diversity (PD) in a three-dimensional structured ecosystem. We focused on the Mediterranean coralligenous assemblages which form complex structures both vertically and horizontally, and are considered as the most diverse and threatened communities of the Mediterranean Sea. Although comparable to tropical reef assemblages in terms of richness, biomass and production, coralligenous assemblages are less known and more rarely studied, in particular because of their location in deep waters. Our study covers the entire range of distribution of coralligenous habitats along the French Mediterranean coasts, representing the most complete database so far developed for this important ecosystem. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of spatial diversity patterns of marine biodiversity on both horizontal and vertical scales. Our study revealed that taxonomic diversity differed from functional and phylogenetic diversity patterns at the station level, the latter two being strongly structured by depth, with shallower stations generally richer than deeper ones. Considering all stations, phylogenetic diversity was less congruent to taxonomic diversity (Pearson's correlation of r = 0.48) but more congruent to functional diversity (r = 0.69) than randomly expected. Similar congruence patterns were revealed for stations deeper than 50 m (r = 0.44 and r = 0.84, respectively) but no significantly different congruence level than randomly expected was revealed among diversity facets for more shallow stations. Mean functional α- and β-diversity were lower than phylogenetic diversity and even lower than taxonomic α- and β-diversity for both vertical and horizontal scales. Low FD and PD values at both α- and β-diversity indicated functional and phylogenetic clustering. Community dissimilarities (β-diversity) increased over depth especially in central and eastern part of the French Mediterranean littoral and in northern Corsica, indicating coralligenous vertical structure within these regions. Overall horizontal β-diversity was higher within the 50–70 m depth belts. We conclude that taxonomic diversity alone is inadequate as a basis for setting conservation goals for this ecosystem and additional information, at least on phylogenetic diversity, is needed to preserve the ecosystem functioning and coralligenous evolutionary history. Our results highlight the necessity of considering different depth belts as a basis for regional scale conservation efforts. Current conservation approaches, such as the existing marine protected areas, are insufficient in preserving coralligenous habitats. The use of multi-facet indices should be considered, focusing on preserving local diversity patterns and compositional dissimilarities, both vertically and horizontally.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue (up) Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1470-160x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1529  
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Auteur Villeger, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Brosse, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Decomposing functional β-diversity reveals that low functional β-diversity is driven by low functional turnover in European fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 22 Numéro 6 Pages 671-681  
  Mots-Clés Europe; Functional richness; beta-diversity; convex hull volume; freshwater fish; functional diversity; functional traits; overlap  
  Résumé  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue (up) Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 507  
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Auteur Navarro, J.; Cardador, L.; Fernández, Á.M.; Bellido, J.M.; Coll, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Differences in the relative roles of environment, prey availability and human activity in the spatial distribution of two marine mesopredators living in highly exploited ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 43 Numéro 3 Pages 440-450  
  Mots-Clés deviance partitioning; elasmobranchs; environmental variables; human stressors; indicator species; marine biodiversity; Marine conservation; Mediterranean Sea; Raja asterias; Scyliorhinus canicula  
  Résumé Aim Identifying the main factors affecting the spatial distribution of marine predators is essential in order to evaluate their distribution patterns, predict the potential impact of human activities on their populations and design accurate management actions. This information is also valuable from a more general management perspective, as marine predators are often considered indicators of habitat quality. In this context, we aimed to determine the degree to which environmental features, prey availability and human activities interact and influence spatial distribution of two marine mesopredator elasmobranchs, the small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) and the Mediterranean starry ray (Raja asterias), living in a highly human-exploited environment. Location Mediterranean Sea. Methods With information obtained from an extended experimental survey, we investigated the relative importance of environmental variables, prey availability and human activities on the spatial distribution of the abundance, biomass and occurrence rate of these marine mesopredators using deviance partitioning analyses. Results Our results revealed that environmental variables were the most important factors explaining the spatial distribution of Mediterranean starry ray, whereas small-spotted catshark distribution was also influenced by prey availability and human factors. From a management point of view, these findings suggest that Mediterranean starry ray could be a good candidate as an indicator species of demersal environmental quality. On the other hand, the distribution of the small-spotted catshark, which responds in an interactive and complex way to environment, prey availability and particular human activities, may be misleading as an environmental indicator. Main conclusions The spatial distribution of elasmobranchs in highly human-impacted marine areas can reflect the interactive and combined effects of multiple factors. To avoid misunderstandings, attention should be paid to statistical procedures allowing the separation of pure and joint contribution of the factors driving the observed spatial patterns.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue (up) en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1365-2699 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1538  
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Auteur Pool, T.K.; Cucherousset, J.; Boulêtreau, S.; Villeger, S.; Strecker, A.L.; Grenouillet, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Increased taxonomic and functional similarity does not increase the trophic similarity of communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 25 Numéro 1 Pages 46-54  
  Mots-Clés Alpha diversity; Beta diversity; compositional similarity; functional diversity; trophic diversity  
  Résumé Aim Despite a long-standing research interest in the association between the biodiversity (i.e. taxonomic and functional composition) and trophic structure of communities, our understanding of the relationship remains limited. Community assembly theory predicts that niche partitioning will result in communities with a diverse array of functional traits, which in turn may facilitate a correspondingly diverse array of trophic interactions that define the trophic niche of those communities. The aim of our study is to test this prediction. Location North America. Methods We built a database composed of functional traits and stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) for 63 freshwater fish communities containing 109 species in 34 lentic and 29 lotic ecosystems. First, using linear mixed models (i.e. an alpha-diversity approach), we tested whether the taxonomic diversity of communities was positively associated with their functional diversity and if their functional diversity was positively associated with their trophic diversity. Second, we assessed the taxonomic, functional and trophic similarity of communities using multiple regression on distance matrices (MRM) and their respective ‘turnover’ and ‘nestedness-resultant’ components to test if the taxonomic similarity of communities was positively correlated with their functional similarity and if their functional similarity was positively associated with their trophic similarity (i.e. a beta-diversity approach). Results We found that the functional diversity of communities increased as their taxonomic diversity increased. Similarly, the trophic diversity of communities increased as their functional diversity increased. The pairwise taxonomic and functional similarity of communities were also positively associated, but there was a weak relationship between the functional and trophic similarities of communities. Main conclusions Our study demonstrates that communities with similar functional characteristics can have disparate food web structures, suggesting that additional site-specific factors influence community variation in trophic niche geometry. Determining the relative importance of functional characteristics and site-specific factors in shaping trophic interactions is crucial for a better understanding of how future species loss and species introductions will affect food web structure and ecosystem functioning.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue (up) en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1540  
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