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Auteur Tribot, A.-S.; Deter, J.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Integrating the aesthetic value of landscapes and biological diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 285 Numéro 1886 Pages 20180971  
  Mots-Clés (up) aesthetic value; biodiversity; conservation; ecological functioning; ecosystem services; increase; indicators; landscape ecology; perception; preferences; quality; species richness; urban green-space  
  Résumé As a cultural ecosystem service, the aesthetic value of landscapes contributes to human well-being, but studies linking biodiversity and ecosystem services generally do not account for this particular service. Therefore, congruence between the aesthetic perception of landscapes, ecological value and biodiversity remains poorly understood. Here, we describe the conceptual background, current methodologies and future challenges of assessing landscape aesthetics and its relationship with biodiversity. We highlight the methodological gaps between the assessment of landscape aesthetics, ecological diversity and functioning. We discuss the challenges associated with connecting landscape aesthetics with ecological value, and the scaling issues in the assessment of human aesthetics perception. To better integrate aesthetic value and ecological components of biodiversity, we propose to combine the study of aesthetics and the understanding of ecological function at both the species and landscape levels. Given the urgent need to engage society in conservation efforts, this approach, based on the combination of the aesthetic experience and the recognition of ecological functioning by the general public, will help change our culture of nature and promote ecologically oriented conservation policies.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2415  
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Auteur Tribot, A.-S.; Deter, J.; Claverie, T.; Guillhaumon, F.; Villeger, S.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Species diversity and composition drive the aesthetic value of coral reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 15 Numéro 11 Pages 20190703  
  Mots-Clés (up) aesthetics; biodiversity; conservation; coral reef fish; ecosystem services; functional diversity; human interest; landscape; nature's contribution to people; quality  
  Résumé Cultural and recreational values of biodiversity are considered as important dimensions of nature's contribution to people. Among these values, the aesthetics can be of major importance as the appreciation of beauty is one of the simplest forms of human emotional response. Using an online survey, we disentangled the effects of different facets of biodiversity on aesthetic preferences of coral reef fish assemblages that are among the most emblematic assemblages on Earth. While we found a positive saturating effect of species' richness on human preference, we found a net negative effect of species abundance, no effect of species functional diversity and contrasting effects of species composition depending on species' attractiveness. Our results suggest that the biodiversity-human interest relationship is more complex than has been previously stated. By integrating several scales of organization, our study is a step forward in better evaluating the aesthetic value of biodiversity.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000504840300013 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2713  
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Auteur Mouton, T.L.; Matheson, F.E.; Stephenson, F.; Champion, P.D.; Wadhwa, S.; Hamer, M.P.; Catlin, A.; Riis, T. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental filtering of native and non-native stream macrophyte assemblages by habitat disturbances in an agricultural landscape Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.  
  Volume 659 Numéro Pages 1370-1381  
  Mots-Clés (up) Agricultural impacts; classification; ecological impacts; eutrophication; Functional diversity; functional diversity measures; Functional traits; land-use; management; metaanalysis; Non-native flora; restoration; RLQ and fourth-corner analyses; species traits; trait responses  
  Résumé Understanding how inter-specific variation in functional traits affects native and non-native species responses to stream disturbances, is necessary to inform management strategies, providing tools for biomonitoring, conservation and restoration. This study used a functional trait approach to characterise the responses of macrophyte assemblages to reach-scale disturbances (measured by lack of riparian shading, altered hydromorphology and eutrophication), from 97 wadeable stream sites in an agriculturally impacted region of New Zealand. To determine whether macrophyte assemblages differed due to disturbances, we examined multidimensional assemblage functional structure in relation to eleven functional traits and further related two functional diversity indices (entropy and originality) to disturbances. Macrophyte assemblages showed distinct patterns in response to disturbances, with riparian shading and hydromorphological conditions being the strongest variables shaping macrophyte functional structure. In the multidimensional space, most of the non-native species were associatedwith disturbed conditions. These species had traits allowing faster colonisation rates (higher number of reproductive organs and larger root-rhizome system) and superior competitive abilities for resources (tall and dense canopy, heterophylly and greater preferences for light and nitrogen). In addition, lack of riparian shading increased the abundance of functionally distinct species (i.e. entropy), and eutrophication resulted in the growth of functionally unique species (i.e. originality). We demonstrated that stream reach-scale habitat disturbances were associated to a dominance of more productive species, equating to a greater abundance of non-native species. This, can result in a displacement of native species, habitat alterations, and changes to higher trophic level assemblages. Our results suggests that reachscale management efforts such as the conservation and restoration of riparian vegetation that provides substantial shading and hydromorphologically diverse in-stream habitat, would have beneficial direct and indirect effects on ecosystem functioning, and contribute to the mitigation of land-use impacts. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2571  
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Auteur Almoussawi, A.; Lenoir, J.; Jamoneau, A.; Hattab, T.; Wasof, S.; Gallet-Moron, E.; Garzon-Lopez, C.X.; Spicher, F.; Kobaissi, A.; Decocq, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Forest fragmentation shapes the alpha-gamma relationship in plant diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Veg. Sci.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés (up) agricultural landscapes; alpha diversity; anthropogenic disturbances; assemblages; community assembly; community patterns; competition; connectivity; dispersal limitations; gamma diversity; habitat conservation strategies; habitat fragmentation; local-regional richness relationship; metacommunity dynamics; regional species richness; relative importance; saturation; specialists; succession  
  Résumé Questions Forest fragmentation affects biodiversity locally (alpha diversity) and beyond – at relatively larger scales (gamma diversity) – by increasing dispersal and recruitment limitations. Yet, does an increase in fragmentation affect the relationship between alpha and gamma diversity and what can we learn from it? Location Northern France. Methods We surveyed 116 forest patches across three fragmentation levels: none (continuous forest); intermediate (forest patches connected by hedgerows); and high (isolated forest patches). Plant species richness of both forest specialists and generalists was surveyed at five nested spatial resolutions across each forest patch: 1 m(2); 10 m(2); 100 m(2); 1,000 m(2); and total forest patch area. First, we ran log-ratio models to quantify the alpha-gamma relationship. We did that separately for all possible combinations of fragmentation level (none vs intermediate vs high) x spatial scale (e.g., alpha-1 m(2) vs gamma-10 m(2)) x species type (e.g., alpha-specialists vs gamma-specialists). We then used linear mixed-effects models to analyze the effect of fragmentation level, spatial scale, species type and all two-way interaction terms on the slope coefficient extracted from all log-ratio models. Results We found an interaction effect between fragmentation level and species type, such that forest specialists shifted from a linear (i.e., proportional sampling) to a curvilinear plateau (i.e., community saturation) relationship at low and high fragmentation, respectively, while generalists shifted from a curvilinear to a linear pattern. Conclusions The impact of forest fragmentation on the alpha-gamma relationship supports generalist species persistence over forest specialists, with contrasting mechanisms for these two guilds. As fragmentation increases, forest specialists shift from proportional sampling towards community saturation, thus reducing alpha diversity likely due to dispersal limitation. Contrariwise, generalists shift from community saturation towards proportional sampling, thus increasing alpha diversity likely due to an increase in the edge:core ratio. To ensure long-term conservation of forest specialists, one single large forest patch should be preferred over several small ones.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1100-9233 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000493723100001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2676  
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Auteur Dobrovolski, R.; Loyola, R.D.; Guilhaumon, F.; Gouveia, S.F.; Diniz, J.A.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global agricultural expansion and carnivore conservation biogeography Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Conserv.  
  Volume 165 Numéro Pages 162-170  
  Mots-Clés (up) Agriculture; Global biodiversity conservation priorities; Image; Mammal; Spatial prioritization; Zonation; biodiversity; biodiversity conservation; conservation; conserving; extinction risk; hotspots; human-population density; integrating economic costs; land-use; mammal conservation; prioritization schemes; protected areas  
  Résumé Global conservation prioritization must address conflicting land uses. We tested for spatial congruence between agricultural expansion in the 21st century and priority areas for carnivore conservation worldwide. We evaluated how including agricultural expansion data in conservation planning reduces such congruence and estimated the consequences of such an approach for the performance of resulting priority area networks. We investigated the correlation between projections of agricultural expansion and the solutions of global spatial prioritizations for carnivore conservation through the implementation of different goals: (1) purely maximizing species representation and (2) representing species while avoiding sites under high pressure for agriculture expansion. We also evaluated the performance of conservation solutions based on species' representation and their spatial congruence with established global prioritization schemes. Priority areas for carnivore conservation were spatially correlated with future agricultural distribution and were more similar to global conservation schemes with high vulnerability. Incorporating future agricultural expansion in the site selection process substantially reduced spatial correlation with agriculture, resulting in a spatial solution more similar to global conservation schemes with low vulnerability. Accounting for agricultural expansion resulted in a lower representation of species, as the average proportion of the range represented reduced from 58% to 32%. We propose that priorities for carnivore conservation could be integrated into a strategy that concentrates different conservation actions towards areas where they are likely to be more effective regarding agricultural expansion. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 622  
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