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Auteur Saeedi, H.; Reimer, J.D.; Brandt, M.; Dumais, P.-O.; Jazdzewska, A.M.; Jeffery, N.W.; Thielen, P.M.; Costello, M.J.
Titre Global marine biodiversity in the context of achieving the Aichi Targets: ways forward and addressing data gaps Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ
Volume 7 Numéro Pages e7221
Mots-Clés (up) Aichi targets; assemblages; benefits; Biodiversity tools and pipelines; Biogeography; conservation; coral-reefs; Data standard; Data standards; deep-sea; Discovery; Dissemination; diversity gradient; life; Marine biodiversity; patterns; Prediction; progress; species richness; Stewardship; Stewardship and dissemination; Tools and pipelines
Résumé In 2010, the Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity agreed on the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. As this plan approaches its end, we discussed whether marine biodiversity and prediction studies were nearing the Aichi Targets during the 4th World Conference on Marine Biodiversity held in Montreal, Canada in June 2018. This article summarises the outcome of a five-day group discussion on how global marine biodiversity studies should be focused further to better understand the patterns of biodiversity. We discussed and reviewed seven fundamental biodiversity priorities related to nine Aichi Targets focusing on global biodiversity discovery and predictions to improve and enhance biodiversity data standards (quantity and quality), tools and techniques, spatial and temporal scale framing, and stewardship and dissemination. We discuss how identifying biodiversity knowledge gaps and promoting efforts have and will reduce such gaps, including via the use of new databases, tools and technology, and how these resources could be improved in the future. The group recognised significant progress toward Target 19 in relation to scientific knowledge, but negligible progress with regard to Targets 6 to 13 which aimed to safeguard and reduce human impacts on biodiversity.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000493041100001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2682
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Auteur Milner-Gulland, E.J.; Garcia, S.; Arlidge, W.; Bull, J.; Charles, A.; Dagorn, L.; Fordham, S.; Zivin, J.G.; Hall, M.; Shrader, J.; Vestergaard, N.; Wilcox, C.; Squires, D.
Titre Translating the terrestrial mitigation hierarchy to marine megafauna by-catch Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish. Fish.
Volume 19 Numéro 3 Pages 547-561
Mots-Clés (up) albatrosses; artisanal fisheries; biodiversity offsets; biodiversity offsetting; circle hooks; conservation; economic incentives; fisheries bycatch; fishing effort; harbor porpoise; leatherback turtle; no net loss; seabird bycatch; sharks and rays; turtles
Résumé In terrestrial and coastal systems, the mitigation hierarchy is widely and increasingly used to guide actions to ensure that no net loss of biodiversity ensues from development. We develop a conceptual model which applies this approach to the mitigation of marine megafauna by-catch in fisheries, going from defining an overarching goal with an associated quantitative target, through avoidance, minimization, remediation to offsetting. We demonstrate the framework's utility as a tool for structuring thinking and exposing uncertainties. We draw comparisons between debates ongoing in terrestrial situations and in by-catch mitigation, to show how insights from each could inform the other; these are the hierarchical nature of mitigation, out-of-kind offsets, research as an offset, incentivizing implementation of mitigation measures, societal limits and uncertainty. We explore how economic incentives could be used throughout the hierarchy to improve the achievement of by-catch goals. We conclude by highlighting the importance of clear agreed goals, of thinking beyond single species and individual jurisdictions to account for complex interactions and policy leakage, of taking uncertainty explicitly into account and of thinking creatively about approaches to by-catch mitigation in order to improve outcomes for conservation and fishers. We suggest that the framework set out here could be helpful in supporting efforts to improve by-catch mitigation efforts and highlight the need for a full empirical application to substantiate this.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 1467-2960 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2337
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Auteur Draredja, M.A.; Frihi, H.; Boualleg, C.; Abadie, E.; Laabir, M.
Titre Distribution of dinoflagellate cyst assemblages in recent sediments from a southern Mediterranean lagoon (Mellah, Algeria) with emphasis on toxic species Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Environ. Sci. Pollut. Res.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés (up) alexandrium-catenella; bizerte lagoon; coastal waters; cochlodinium-polykrikoides; Dinoflagellate cysts; Diversity; Environmental factors; genus alexandrium; harmful algal blooms; Mellah lagoon; northwestern indian-ocean; resting cysts; Spatial distribution; spatial-distribution; surface sediments; Toxic species
Résumé This is the first study on the dinoflagellate cysts in Algerian waters and in Mellah Lagoon (South Western Mediterranean), located within a protected reserve. In total, 42 species of dinocysts belonging to 7 orders, 12 families and 23 genera, were identified in the 26 superficial sediment samples from Mellah Lagoon. The distribution of dinocysts in the sediment of this lagoon is heterogeneous. Indeed, their abundance oscillates between 1 and 315 cysts g(-1) dry sediment (DS). Cyst morphotype assemblages were dominated by a few numbers of species: Alexandrium minutum (15.87%), Gonyaulax verior (9.81%), Protoperidinium spp. (7.74%), Alexandrium affine (7.05%), Scrippsiella trochoidea (6.67%), and Alexandrium pseudogonyaulax (6.19%). There is a positive correlation between the density of cysts and the depth (r = 0.61; p < 0.05), organic matter (r = 0.70; p < 0.05), water content (r = 0.71; p < 0.05), and the fine fraction of sediment (r = 0.74; p < 0.05). Surprisingly, although the Mellah Lagoon is almost semi-closed, it holds an important specific richness in dinocysts (42 species) higher than others observed in Mediterranean lagoons. However, cyst abundances are low compared to other lagoons in the Mediterranean Sea. Finally, the presence of dinocysts of Alexandrium catenella/tamarense, A. minutum, and Gymnodinium catenatum associated to paralytic shellfish toxins, A. pseudogonyaulax which produces goniodomin A, also Protoceratium reticulatum and Gonyaulax spinifera complex which produce yessotoxins, needs to implement a monitoring program to prevent a potential human intoxication due to the consumption of contaminated sea products by these potent neurotoxins.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0944-1344 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000529493300024 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2796
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Auteur Arnaud-Haond, S.; Aires, T.; Candeias, R.; Teixeira, S.J.L.; Duarte, C.M.; Valero, M.; Serrao, E.A.
Titre Entangled fates of holobiont genomes during invasion: nested bacterial and host diversities in Caulerpa taxifolia Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.
Volume 26 Numéro 8 Pages 2379-2391
Mots-Clés (up) Algae; australia; Caulerpa; Chlorophyta; clonal diversity; dna; endophytic communities; genetic diversity; holobiont; invasion paradox; marine invasion; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; parasites; plant invasions; polymorphism
Résumé Successful prevention and mitigation of biological invasions requires retracing the initial steps of introduction, as well as understanding key elements enhancing the adaptability of invasive species. We studied the genetic diversity of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia and its associated bacterial communities in several areas around the world. The striking congruence of alpha and beta diversity of the algal genome and endophytic communities reveals a tight association, supporting the holobiont concept as best describing the unit of spreading and invasion. Both genomic compartments support the hypotheses of a unique accidental introduction in the Mediterranean and of multiple invasion events in southern Australia. In addition to helping with tracing the origin of invasion, bacterial communities exhibit metabolic functions that can potentially enhance adaptability and competitiveness of the consortium they form with their host. We thus hypothesize that low genetic diversities of both host and symbiont communities may contribute to the recent regression in the Mediterranean, in contrast with the persistence of highly diverse assemblages in southern Australia. This study supports the importance of scaling up from the host to the holobiont for a comprehensive understanding of invasions.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2143
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Auteur Katsanevakis, S.; Coll, M.; Piroddi, C.; Steenbeek, J.; Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Zenetos, A.; Cardoso, A.C.
Titre Invading the Mediterranean Sea: biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci
Volume 1 Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés (up) alien species; Aquaculture; biodiversity patterns; biological invasions; Lessepsian migrants; pathways; shipping
Résumé Human activities, such as shipping, aquaculture, and the opening of the Suez Canal, have led to the introduction of nearly 1000 alien species into the Mediterranean Sea. We investigated how human activities, by providing pathways for the introduction of alien species, may shape the biodiversity patterns in the Mediterranean Sea. Richness of Red Sea species introduced through the Suez Canal (Lessepsian species) is very high along the eastern Mediterranean coastline, reaching a maximum of 129 species per 100 km2, and declines toward the north and west. The distribution of species introduced by shipping is strikingly different, with several hotspot areas occurring throughout the Mediterranean basin. Two main hotspots for aquaculture-introduced species are observed (the Thau and Venice lagoons). Certain taxonomic groups were mostly introduced through specific pathways—fish through the Suez Canal, macrophytes by aquaculture, and invertebrates through the Suez Canal and by shipping. Hence, the local taxonomic identity of the alien species was greatly dependent on the dominant maritime activities/interventions and the related pathways of introduction. The composition of alien species differs among Mediterranean ecoregions; such differences are greater for Lessepsian and aquaculture-introduced species. The spatial pattern of native species biodiversity differs from that of alien species: the overall richness of native species declines from the north-western to the south-eastern regions, while the opposite trend is observed for alien species. The biodiversity of the Mediterranean Sea is changing, and further research is needed to better understand how the new biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities will affect the Mediterranean food webs, ecosystem functioning, and the provision of ecosystem services.
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Numéro d'Appel collection 313
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