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Auteur Katsanevakis, S.; Coll, M.; Piroddi, C.; Steenbeek, J.; Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Zenetos, A.; Cardoso, A.C. url  doi
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  Titre Invading the Mediterranean Sea: biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci  
  Volume 1 Numéro (up) Pages  
  Mots-Clés alien species; Aquaculture; biodiversity patterns; biological invasions; Lessepsian migrants; pathways; shipping  
  Résumé Human activities, such as shipping, aquaculture, and the opening of the Suez Canal, have led to the introduction of nearly 1000 alien species into the Mediterranean Sea. We investigated how human activities, by providing pathways for the introduction of alien species, may shape the biodiversity patterns in the Mediterranean Sea. Richness of Red Sea species introduced through the Suez Canal (Lessepsian species) is very high along the eastern Mediterranean coastline, reaching a maximum of 129 species per 100 km2, and declines toward the north and west. The distribution of species introduced by shipping is strikingly different, with several hotspot areas occurring throughout the Mediterranean basin. Two main hotspots for aquaculture-introduced species are observed (the Thau and Venice lagoons). Certain taxonomic groups were mostly introduced through specific pathways—fish through the Suez Canal, macrophytes by aquaculture, and invertebrates through the Suez Canal and by shipping. Hence, the local taxonomic identity of the alien species was greatly dependent on the dominant maritime activities/interventions and the related pathways of introduction. The composition of alien species differs among Mediterranean ecoregions; such differences are greater for Lessepsian and aquaculture-introduced species. The spatial pattern of native species biodiversity differs from that of alien species: the overall richness of native species declines from the north-western to the south-eastern regions, while the opposite trend is observed for alien species. The biodiversity of the Mediterranean Sea is changing, and further research is needed to better understand how the new biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities will affect the Mediterranean food webs, ecosystem functioning, and the provision of ecosystem services.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel collection 313  
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Auteur Muller-Karger, F.E.; Miloslavich, P.; Bax, N.J.; Simmons, S.; Costello, M.J.; Sousa Pinto, I.; Canonico, G.; Turner, W.; Gill, M.; Montes, E.; Best, B.D.; Pearlman, J.; Halpin, P.; Dunn, D.; Benson, A.; Martin, C.S.; Weatherdon, L.V.; Appeltans, W.; Provoost, P.; Klein, E.; Kelble, C.R.; Miller, R.J.; Chavez, F.P.; Iken, K.; Chiba, S.; Obura, D.; Navarro, L.M.; Pereira, H.M.; Allain, V.; Batten, S.; Benedetti-Checchi, L.; Duffy, J.E.; Kudela, R.M.; Rebelo, L.-M.; Shin, Y.; Geller, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Advancing Marine Biological Observations and Data Requirements of the Complementary Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) and Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) Frameworks Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 5 Numéro (up) Pages  
  Mots-Clés Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs); Essential Ocean Variables (EOV); Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS); Integrated Marine Biosphere Research (IMBeR); Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON); Marine Global Earth Observatory (MarineGEO); Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS)  
  Résumé Measurements of the status and trends of key indicators for the ocean and marine life are required to inform policy and management in the context of growing human uses of marine resources, coastal development, and climate change. Two synergistic efforts identify specific priority variables for monitoring: Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) through the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS), and Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) from the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON). Both systems support reporting against internationally agreed conventions and treaties. GOOS, established under the auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), plays a leading role in coordinating global monitoring of the ocean and in the definition of EOVs. GEO BON is a global biodiversity observation network that coordinates observations to enhance management of the world’s biodiversity and promote both the awareness and accounting of ecosystem services. Convergence and agreement between these two efforts are required to streamline existing and new marine observation programs to advance scientific knowledge effectively and to support the sustainable use and management of ocean spaces and resources. In this context, the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON), a thematic component of GEO BON, is collaborating with GOOS, the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), and the Integrated Marine Biosphere Research (IMBeR) project to ensure that EBVs and EOVs are complementary, representing alternative uses of a common set of scientific measurements. This work is informed by the Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM), an intergovernmental body of technical experts that helps international coordination on best practices for observing, data management and services, combined with capacity development expertise. Characterizing biodiversity and understanding its drivers will require incorporation of observations from traditional and molecular taxonomy, animal tagging and tracking efforts, ocean biogeochemistry, and ocean observatory initiatives including the deep ocean and seafloor. The partnership between large-scale ocean observing and product distribution initiatives (MBON, OBIS, JCOMM, and GOOS) is an expedited, effective way to support international policy-level assessments (e.g., the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services or IPBES), along with the implementation of international development goals (e.g., the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals).  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2371  
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Auteur Ranchou-Peyruse, M.; Auguet, J.-C.; Maziere, C.; Restrepo-Ortiz, C.X.; Guignard, M.; Dequidt, D.; Chiquet, P.; Cezac, P.; Ranchou-Peyruse, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Geological gas-storage shapes deep life Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Environ. Microbiol.  
  Volume Numéro (up) Pages  
  Mots-Clés carbon; degradation; depth; desulfotomaculum; diversity; methanogenesis; microbial communities; spp.; sulfate-reducing bacteria; sulfite  
  Résumé Around the world, several dozen deep sedimentary aquifers are being used for storage of natural gas. Ad hoc studies of the microbial ecology of some of them have suggested that sulfate reducing and methanogenic microorganisms play a key role in how these aquifers' communities function. Here, we investigate the influence of gas storage on these two metabolic groups by using high-throughput sequencing and show the importance of sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum and a new monophyletic methanogenic group. Aquifer microbial diversity was significantly related to the geological level. The distance to the stored natural gas affects the ratio of sulfate-reducing Firmicutes to deltaproteobacteria. In only one aquifer, the methanogenic archaea dominate the sulfate-reducers. This aquifer was used to store town gas (containing at least 50% H-2) around 50 years ago. The observed decrease of sulfates in this aquifer could be related to stimulation of subsurface sulfate-reducers. These results suggest that the composition of the microbial communities is impacted by decades old transient gas storage activity. The tremendous stability of these gas-impacted deep subsurface microbial ecosystems suggests that in situ biotic methanation projects in geological reservoirs may be sustainable over time.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1462-2912 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000480010600001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2627  
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Auteur Escalas, A.; Catherine, A.; Maloufi, S.; Cellamare, M.; Hamlaoui, S.; Yepremian, C.; Louvard, C.; Troussellier, M.; Bernard, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Drivers and ecological consequences of dominance in periurban phytoplankton communities using networks approaches Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Water Res.  
  Volume 163 Numéro (up) Pages Unsp-114893  
  Mots-Clés blooms; climate-change; Co-occurrence network; Community cohesion; Community functioning; cooccurrence patterns; cyanobacteria dominance; diversity; Dominance; fresh-waters; lakes; light; Periurban waterbodies; Phytoplankton; resource use efficiency; species richness  
  Résumé Evaluating the causes and consequences of dominance by a limited number of taxa in phytoplankton communities is of huge importance in the current context of increasing anthropogenic pressures on natural ecosystems. This is of particular concern in densely populated urban areas where usages and impacts of human populations on water ecosystems are strongly interconnected. Microbial biodiversity is commonly used as a bioindicator of environmental quality and ecosystem functioning, but there are few studies at the regional scale that integrate the drivers of dominance in phytoplankton communities and their consequences on the structure and functioning of these communities. Here, we studied the causes and consequences of phytoplankton dominance in 50 environmentally contrasted waterbodies, sampled over four summer campaigns in the highly-populated Ile-de-France region (IDF). Phytoplankton dominance was observed in 32-52% of the communities and most cases were attributed to Chlorophyta (35.5-40.6% of cases) and Cyanobacteria (30.3-36.5%). The best predictors of dominance were identified using multinomial logistic regression and included waterbody features (surface, depth and connection to the hydrological network) and water column characteristics (total N, TN:TP ratio, water temperature and stratification). The consequences of dominance were dependent on the identity of the dominant organisms and included modifications of biological attributes (richness, cohesion) and functioning (biomass, RUE) of phytoplankton communities. We constructed co-occurrence networks using high resolution phytoplankton biomass and demonstrated that networks under dominance by Chlorophyta and Cyanobacteria exhibited significantly different structure compared with networks without dominance. Furthermore, dominance by Cyanobacteria was associated with more profound network modifications (e.g. cohesion, size, density, efficiency and proportion of negative links), suggesting a stronger disruption of the structure and functioning of phytoplankton communities in the conditions in which this group dominates. Finally, we provide a synthesis on the relationships between environmental drivers, dominance status, community attributes and network structure. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0043-1354 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000483006400038 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2636  
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Auteur Leroy, B.; Dias, M.S.; Giraud, E.; Hugueny, B.; Jezequel, C.; Leprieur, F.; Oberdorff, T.; Tedesco, P.A. doi  openurl
  Titre Global biogeographical regions of freshwater fish species Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume Numéro (up) Pages  
  Mots-Clés actinopterygians; biogeographical regions; biogeography; bioregionalization; bioregions; connectivity; dispersal; diversity; evolution; freshwater fish; history; homogenization; network; patterns; richness; transition zones; vicariance; world; zoogeographical regions  
  Résumé Aim To define the major biogeographical regions and transition zones for freshwater fish species. Taxon Strictly freshwater species of actinopterygian fish (i.e. excluding marine and amphidromous fish families). Methods We based our bioregionalization on a global database of freshwater fish species occurrences in drainage basins, which, after filtering, includes 11,295 species in 2,581 basins. On the basis of this dataset, we generated a bipartite (basin-species) network upon which we applied a hierarchical clustering algorithm (the Map Equation) to detect regions. We tested the robustness of regions with a sensitivity analysis. We identified transition zones between major regions with the participation coefficient, indicating the degree to which a basin has species from multiple regions. Results Our bioregionalization scheme showed two major supercontinental regions (Old World and New World, 50% species of the world and 99.96% endemics each). Nested within these two supercontinental regions lie six major regions (Nearctic, Neotropical, Palearctic, Ethiopian, Sino-Oriental and Australian) with extremely high degrees of endemism (above 96% except for the Palearctic). Transition zones between regions were of limited extent compared to other groups of organisms. We identified numerous subregions with high diversity and endemism in tropical areas (e.g. Neotropical), and a few large subregions with low diversity and endemism at high latitudes (e.g. Palearctic). Main conclusions Our results suggest that regions of freshwater fish species were shaped by events of vicariance and geodispersal which were similar to other groups, but with freshwater-specific processes of isolation that led to extremely high degrees of endemism (far exceeding endemism rates of other continental vertebrates), specific boundary locations and limited extents of transition zones. The identified bioregions and transition zones of freshwater fish species reflect the strong isolation of freshwater fish faunas for the past 10-20 million years. The extremely high endemism and diversity of freshwater fish fauna raises many questions about the biogeographical consequences of current introductions and extinctions.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000484392300001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2637  
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