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Auteur Mouillot, D.; Parravicini, V.; Bellwood, D.R.; Leprieur, F.; Huang, D.; Cowman, P.F.; Albouy, C.; Hughes, T.P.; Thuiller, W.; Guilhaumon, F.
Titre Global marine protected areas do not secure the evolutionary history of tropical corals and fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.
Volume 7 Numéro (up) Pages 10359
Mots-Clés Biodiversity; conservation; extinction risk; functional diversity; management; patterns; phylogenetic diversity; reef fisheries; species richness; vulnerability
Résumé Although coral reefs support the largest concentrations of marine biodiversity worldwide, the extent to which the global system of marine-protected areas (MPAs) represents individual species and the breadth of evolutionary history across the Tree of Life has never been quantified. Here we show that only 5.7% of scleractinian coral species and 21.7% of labrid fish species reach the minimum protection target of 10% of their geographic ranges within MPAs. We also estimate that the current global MPA system secures only 1.7% of the Tree of Life for corals, and 17.6% for fishes. Regionally, the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific show the greatest deficit of protection for corals while for fishes this deficit is located primarily in the Western Indian Ocean and in the Central Pacific. Our results call for a global coordinated expansion of current conservation efforts to fully secure the Tree of Life on coral reefs.
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ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1506
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Auteur Maury, O.; Poggiale, J.-C.
Titre From individuals to populations to communities: A dynamic energy budget model of marine ecosystem size-spectrum including life history diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Theoretical Biology
Volume 324 Numéro (up) Pages 52-71
Mots-Clés biodiversity; Dynamic Energy Budget theory; predation; Schooling; Size spectrum
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ISSN 0022-5193 ISBN Médium
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Notes <p>\textbackslashtextlessp\textbackslashtextgreaterIndividual metabolism, predator–prey relationships, and the role of biodiversity are major factors underlying the dynamics of food webs and their response to environmental variability. Despite their crucial, complementary and interacting influences, they are usually not considered simultaneously in current marine ecosystem models. In an attempt to fill this gap and determine if these factors and their interaction are sufficient to allow realistic community structure and dynamics to emerge, we formulate a mathematical model of the size-structured dynamics of marine communities which integrates mechanistically individual, population and community levels. The model represents the transfer of energy generated in both time and size by an infinite number of interacting fish species spanning from very small to very large species. It is based on standard individual level assumptions of the Dynamic Energy Budget theory (DEB) as well as important ecological processes such as opportunistic size-based predation and competition for food. Resting on the inter-specific body-size scaling relationships of the DEB theory, the diversity of life-history traits (i.e. biodiversity) is explicitly integrated. The stationary solutions of the model as well as the transient solutions arising when environmental signals (e.g. variability of primary production and temperature) propagate through the ecosystem are studied using numerical simulations. It is shown that in the absence of density-dependent feedback processes, the model exhibits unstable oscillations. Density-dependent schooling probability and schooling-dependent predatory and disease mortalities are proposed to be important stabilizing factors allowing stationary solutions to be reached. At the community level, the shape and slope of the obtained quasi-linear stationary spectrum matches well with empirical studies. When oscillations of primary production are simulated, the model predicts that the variability propagates along the spectrum in a given frequency-dependent size range before decreasing for larger sizes. At the species level, the simulations show that small and large species dominate the community successively (small species being more abundant at small sizes and large species being more abundant at large sizes) and that the total biomass of a species decreases with its maximal size which again corroborates empirical studies. Our results indicate that the simultaneous consideration of individual growth and reproduction, size-structured trophic interactions, the diversity of life-history traits and a density-dependent stabilizing process allow realistic community structure and dynamics to emerge without any arbitrary prescription. As a logical consequence of our model construction and a basis for future studies, we define the function Φ as the relative contribution of each species to the total biomass of the ecosystem, for any given size. We argue that this function is a measure of the functional role of biodiversity characterizing the impact of the structure of the community (its species composition) on its function (the relative proportions of losses, dissipation and biological work).\textbackslashtextless/p\textbackslashtextgreater</p> Approuvé pas de
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Auteur Mouton, T.L.; Matheson, F.E.; Stephenson, F.; Champion, P.D.; Wadhwa, S.; Hamer, M.P.; Catlin, A.; Riis, T.
Titre Environmental filtering of native and non-native stream macrophyte assemblages by habitat disturbances in an agricultural landscape Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.
Volume 659 Numéro (up) Pages 1370-1381
Mots-Clés Agricultural impacts; classification; ecological impacts; eutrophication; Functional diversity; functional diversity measures; Functional traits; land-use; management; metaanalysis; Non-native flora; restoration; RLQ and fourth-corner analyses; species traits; trait responses
Résumé Understanding how inter-specific variation in functional traits affects native and non-native species responses to stream disturbances, is necessary to inform management strategies, providing tools for biomonitoring, conservation and restoration. This study used a functional trait approach to characterise the responses of macrophyte assemblages to reach-scale disturbances (measured by lack of riparian shading, altered hydromorphology and eutrophication), from 97 wadeable stream sites in an agriculturally impacted region of New Zealand. To determine whether macrophyte assemblages differed due to disturbances, we examined multidimensional assemblage functional structure in relation to eleven functional traits and further related two functional diversity indices (entropy and originality) to disturbances. Macrophyte assemblages showed distinct patterns in response to disturbances, with riparian shading and hydromorphological conditions being the strongest variables shaping macrophyte functional structure. In the multidimensional space, most of the non-native species were associatedwith disturbed conditions. These species had traits allowing faster colonisation rates (higher number of reproductive organs and larger root-rhizome system) and superior competitive abilities for resources (tall and dense canopy, heterophylly and greater preferences for light and nitrogen). In addition, lack of riparian shading increased the abundance of functionally distinct species (i.e. entropy), and eutrophication resulted in the growth of functionally unique species (i.e. originality). We demonstrated that stream reach-scale habitat disturbances were associated to a dominance of more productive species, equating to a greater abundance of non-native species. This, can result in a displacement of native species, habitat alterations, and changes to higher trophic level assemblages. Our results suggests that reachscale management efforts such as the conservation and restoration of riparian vegetation that provides substantial shading and hydromorphologically diverse in-stream habitat, would have beneficial direct and indirect effects on ecosystem functioning, and contribute to the mitigation of land-use impacts. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2571
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Auteur Misson, B.; Garnier, C.; Lauga, B.; Dang, D.H.; Ghiglione, J.-F.; Mullot, J.-U.; Duran, R.; Pringault, O.
Titre Chemical multi-contamination drives benthic prokaryotic diversity in the anthropized Toulon Bay Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Science of The Total Environment
Volume 556 Numéro (up) Pages 319-329
Mots-Clés Marine sediment; Microbial ecotoxicology; Multi-contamination; Prokaryotic diversity
Résumé Investigating the impact of human activities on marine coastal ecosystems remains difficult because of the co-occurrence of numerous natural and human-induced gradients. Our aims were (i) to evaluate the links between the chemical environment as a whole and microbial diversity in the benthic compartment, and (ii) to compare the contributions of anthropogenic and natural chemical gradients to microbial diversity shifts. We studied surface sediments from 54 sampling sites in the semi-enclosed Toulon Bay (NW Mediterranean) exposed to high anthropogenic pressure. Previously published chemical data were completed by new measurements, resulting in an in depth geochemical characterization by 29 representative environmental variables. Bacterial and archaeal diversity was assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling on a selection of samples distributed along chemical gradients. Multivariate statistical analyses explained from 45% to 80% of the spatial variation in microbial diversity, considering only the chemical variables. A selection of trace metals of anthropogenic origin appeared to be strong structural factors for both bacterial and archaeal communities. Bacterial terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) richness correlated strongly with both anthropogenic and natural chemical gradients, whereas archaeal T-RF richness demonstrated fewer links with chemical variables. No significant decrease in diversity was evidenced in relation to chemical contamination, suggesting a high adaptive potential of benthic microbial communities in Toulon Bay.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1560
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Auteur Moullec, F.; Barrier, N.; Drira, S.; Guilhaumon, F.; Marsaleix, P.; Somot, S.; Ulses, C.; Velez, L.; Shin, Y.-J.
Titre An End-to-End Model Reveals Losers and Winners in a Warming Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 6 Numéro (up) Pages
Mots-Clés Biodiversity scenario; Climate Change; Ecosytem model; End-to-end model; Fishing; Mediterraenan sea; Osmose
Résumé The Mediterranean Sea is now recognized as a hotspot of global change, ranking among the fastest warming ocean regions. In order to project future plausible scenarios of marine biodiversity at the scale of the whole Mediterranean basin, the current challenge is to develop an explicit representation of the multispecies spatial dynamics under the combined influence of fishing pressure and climate change. Notwithstanding the advanced state-of-the-art modelling of food webs in the region, no previous studies have projected the consequences of climate change on marine ecosystems in an integrated way, considering changes in ocean dynamics, in phyto- and zoo-plankton productions, shifts in Mediterranean species distributions and their trophic interactions at the whole basin scale. We used an integrated modelling chain including a high-resolution regional climate model, a regional biogeochemistry model and a food web model OSMOSE to project the potential effects of climate change on biomass and catches for a wide array of species in the Mediterranean Sea. We showed that projected climate change would have large consequences for marine biodiversity by the end of the 21st century under a business-as-usual scenario (RCP8.5 with current fishing mortality). The total biomass of high trophic level species (fish and macroinvertebrates) is projected to increase by 5% and 22% while total catch is projected to increase by 0.3% and 7% by 2021-2050 and 2071-2100, respectively. However, these global increases masked strong spatial and inter-species contrasts. The bulk of increase in catch and biomass would be located in the southeastern part of the basin while total catch could decrease by up to 23% in the western part. Winner species would mainly belong to the pelagic group, are thermophilic and/or exotic, of smaller size and of low trophic level while loser species are generally large-sized, some of them of great commercial interest, and could suffer from a spatial mismatch with potential prey subsequent to a contraction or shift of their geographic range. Given the already poor conditions of exploited resources, our results suggest the need for fisheries management to adapt to future changes and to incorporate climate change impacts in future management strategy evaluation.
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ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000472620400001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2587
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