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Auteur Maury, O.; Poggiale, J.-C. url  openurl
  Titre From individuals to populations to communities: A dynamic energy budget model of marine ecosystem size-spectrum including life history diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Theoretical Biology  
  Volume 324 Numéro Pages 52-71  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; Dynamic Energy Budget theory; predation; Schooling; Size spectrum  
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  ISSN (up) 0022-5193 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes <p>\textbackslashtextlessp\textbackslashtextgreaterIndividual metabolism, predator–prey relationships, and the role of biodiversity are major factors underlying the dynamics of food webs and their response to environmental variability. Despite their crucial, complementary and interacting influences, they are usually not considered simultaneously in current marine ecosystem models. In an attempt to fill this gap and determine if these factors and their interaction are sufficient to allow realistic community structure and dynamics to emerge, we formulate a mathematical model of the size-structured dynamics of marine communities which integrates mechanistically individual, population and community levels. The model represents the transfer of energy generated in both time and size by an infinite number of interacting fish species spanning from very small to very large species. It is based on standard individual level assumptions of the Dynamic Energy Budget theory (DEB) as well as important ecological processes such as opportunistic size-based predation and competition for food. Resting on the inter-specific body-size scaling relationships of the DEB theory, the diversity of life-history traits (i.e. biodiversity) is explicitly integrated. The stationary solutions of the model as well as the transient solutions arising when environmental signals (e.g. variability of primary production and temperature) propagate through the ecosystem are studied using numerical simulations. It is shown that in the absence of density-dependent feedback processes, the model exhibits unstable oscillations. Density-dependent schooling probability and schooling-dependent predatory and disease mortalities are proposed to be important stabilizing factors allowing stationary solutions to be reached. At the community level, the shape and slope of the obtained quasi-linear stationary spectrum matches well with empirical studies. When oscillations of primary production are simulated, the model predicts that the variability propagates along the spectrum in a given frequency-dependent size range before decreasing for larger sizes. At the species level, the simulations show that small and large species dominate the community successively (small species being more abundant at small sizes and large species being more abundant at large sizes) and that the total biomass of a species decreases with its maximal size which again corroborates empirical studies. Our results indicate that the simultaneous consideration of individual growth and reproduction, size-structured trophic interactions, the diversity of life-history traits and a density-dependent stabilizing process allow realistic community structure and dynamics to emerge without any arbitrary prescription. As a logical consequence of our model construction and a basis for future studies, we define the function Φ as the relative contribution of each species to the total biomass of the ecosystem, for any given size. We argue that this function is a measure of the functional role of biodiversity characterizing the impact of the structure of the community (its species composition) on its function (the relative proportions of losses, dissipation and biological work).\textbackslashtextless/p\textbackslashtextgreater</p> Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 245  
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Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Auber, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Interspecific differences in environmental response blur trait dynamics in classic statistical analyses Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.  
  Volume 166 Numéro 12 Pages 152  
  Mots-Clés climate-change; community composition; ecology; framework; functional diversity; impact; rules  
  Résumé Trait-based ecology strives to better understand how species, through their bio-ecological traits, respond to environmental changes, and influence ecosystem functioning. Identifying which traits are most responsive to environmental changes can provide insight for understanding community structuring and developing sustainable management practices. However, misinterpretations are possible, because standard statistical methods (e.g., principal component analysis and linear regression) for identifying and ranking the responses of different traits to environmental changes ignore interspecific differences. Here, using both artificial data and real-world examples from marine fish communities, we show how considering species-specific responses can lead to drastically different results than standard community-level methods. By demonstrating the potential impacts of interspecific differences on trait dynamics, we illuminate a major, yet rarely discussed issue, highlighting how analytical misinterpretations can confound our basic understanding of trait responses, which could have important consequences for biodiversity conservation.  
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  ISSN (up) 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000496131000001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2660  
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Auteur Aubé, J.; Senin, P.; Pringault, O.; Bonin, P.; Deflandre, B.; Bouchez, O.; Bru, N.; Biritxinaga-Etchart, E.; Klopp, C.; Guyoneaud, R.; Goñi-Urriza, M. url  doi
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  Titre The impact of long-term hydrocarbon exposure on the structure, activity, and biogeochemical functioning of microbial mats Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin  
  Volume 111 Numéro 1 Pages 115-125  
  Mots-Clés Biogeochemical functioning; diversity; Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria; Microbial mats  
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  ISSN (up) 0025-326x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2155  
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Auteur Zhao, T.; Villeger, S.; Cucherousset, J. doi  openurl
  Titre Accounting for intraspecific diversity when examining relationships between non-native species and functional diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Oecologia  
  Volume 189 Numéro 1 Pages 171-183  
  Mots-Clés fish; Intraspecific variability; size; disturbance; Non-native species; phenotypic plasticity; Functional diversity; reveals; catfish silurus-glanis; coexistence; Community assembly; energy relationships; Functional traits; success; trait variability  
  Résumé Quantifying changes in functional diversity, the facet of biodiversity accounting for the biological features of organisms, has been advocated as one of the most integrative ways to unravel how communities are affected by human-induced perturbations. The present study assessed how functional diversity patterns varied among communities that differed in the degree to which non-native species dominated the community in temperate lake fish communities and whether accounting for intraspecific functional variability could provide a better understanding of the variation of functional diversity across communities. Four functional diversity indices were computed for 18 temperate lake fish communities along a gradient of non-native fish dominance using morphological functional traits assessed for each life-stage within each species. First, we showed that intraspecific variability in functional traits was high and comparable to interspecific variability. Second, we found that non-native fish were functionally distinct from native fish. Finally, we demonstrated that there was a significant relationship between functional diversity and the degree to which non-native fish currently dominated the community and that this association could be better detected when accounting for intraspecific functional variability. These findings highlighted the importance of incorporating intraspecific variability to better quantify the variation of functional diversity patterns in communities facing human-induced perturbations.  
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  ISSN (up) 0029-8549 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2479  
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Auteur Massol, F.; Altermatt, F.; Gounand, I.; Gravel, D.; Leibold, M.A.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre How life-history traits affect ecosystem properties: effects of dispersal in meta-ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Oikos  
  Volume 126 Numéro 4 Pages 532-546  
  Mots-Clés colonization trade-off; ecological stoichiometry; interaction strengths; neutral metacommunities; pond metacommunities; predator-prey interactions; source-sink metacommunities; species-diversity; terrestrial food webs; theoretical framework  
  Résumé The concept of life-history traits and the study of these traits are the hallmark of population biology. Acknowledging their variability and evolution has allowed us to understand how species adapt in response to their environment. The same traits are also involved in how species alter ecosystems and shape their dynamics and functioning. Some theories, such as the metabolic theory of ecology, ecological stoichiometry or pace-of-life theory, already recognize this junction, but only do so in an implicitly non-spatial context. Meanwhile, for a decade now, it has been argued that ecosystem properties have to be understood at a larger scale using meta-ecosystem theory because source-sink dynamics, community assembly and ecosystem stability are all modified by spatial structure. Here, we argue that some ecosystem properties can be linked to a single life-history trait, dispersal, i.e. the tendency of organisms to live, compete and reproduce away from their birth place. By articulating recent theoretical and empirical studies linking ecosystem functioning and dynamics to species dispersal, we aim to highlight both the known connections between life-history traits and ecosystem properties and the unknown areas, which deserve further empirical and theoretical developments.  
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  ISSN (up) 0030-1299 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2120  
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