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Auteur Maire, E.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Hoey, A.S.; Cinner, J.; Ferse, S.C.A.; Aliaume, C.; Booth, D.J.; Feary, D.A.; Kulbicki, M.; Sandin, S.A.; Vigliola, L.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Community-wide scan identifies fish species associated with coral reef services across the Indo-Pacific Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 285 Numéro 1883 Pages (down) 20181167  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate-change; coral reefs; diversity; ecosystem functioning; ecosystem services; ecosystem-function; fish community; impact; key species; multifunctionality; productivity; redundancy; resilience; resistance  
  Résumé Determining whether many functionally complementary species or only a subset of key species are necessary to maintain ecosystem functioning and services is a critical question in community ecology and biodiversity conservation. Identifying such key species remains challenging, especially in the tropics where many species co-occur and can potentially support the same or different processes. Here, we developed a new community-wide scan CWS) approach, analogous to the genome-wide scan, to identify fish species that significantly contribute, beyond the socio-environmental and species richness effects, to the biomass and coral cover on Indo-Pacific reefs. We found that only a limited set of species (51 out of approx. 400, = approx. 13%), belonging to various functional groups and evolutionary lineages, are strongly and positively associated with fish biomass and live coral cover. Many of these species have not previously been identified as functionally important, and thus may be involved in unknown, yet important, biological mechanisms that help sustain healthy and productive coral reefs. CWS has the potential to reveal species that are key to ecosystem functioning and services and to guide management strategies as well as new experiments to decipher underlying causal ecological processes.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2392  
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Auteur Gaboriau, T.; Albouy, C.; Descombes, P.; Mouillot, D.; Pellissier, L.; Leprieur, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological constraints coupled with deep-time habitat dynamics predict the latitudinal diversity gradient in reef fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 286 Numéro 1911 Pages (down) 20191506  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate; diversification; environmental-changes; global patterns; latitudinal diversity gradient; mechanistic model; niche conservatism; palaeohabitat; plate-tectonics; rates; reef fish; relative roles; species richness  
  Résumé We develop a spatially explicit model of diversification based on palaeohabitat to explore the predictions of four major hypotheses potentially explaining the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), namely, the 'time-area', 'tropical niche conservatism', 'ecological limits' and 'evolutionary speed' livpotheses. We compare simulation outputs to observed diversity gradients in the global reef fish fauna. Our simulations show that these hypotheses are nonmutually exclusive and that their relative influence depends on the time scale considered. Simulations suggest that reef habitat dynamics produced the LDG during deep geological time, while ecological constraints shaped the modern LDG, with a strong influence of the reduction in the latitudinal extent of tropical reefs during the Neogene. Overall, this study illustrates how mechanistic models in ecology and evolution can provide a temporal and spatial understanding of the role of speciation, extinction and dispersal in generating biodiversity patterns.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000486417800008 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2650  
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Auteur Tribot, A.-S.; Deter, J.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Integrating the aesthetic value of landscapes and biological diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 285 Numéro 1886 Pages (down) 20180971  
  Mots-Clés aesthetic value; biodiversity; conservation; ecological functioning; ecosystem services; increase; indicators; landscape ecology; perception; preferences; quality; species richness; urban green-space  
  Résumé As a cultural ecosystem service, the aesthetic value of landscapes contributes to human well-being, but studies linking biodiversity and ecosystem services generally do not account for this particular service. Therefore, congruence between the aesthetic perception of landscapes, ecological value and biodiversity remains poorly understood. Here, we describe the conceptual background, current methodologies and future challenges of assessing landscape aesthetics and its relationship with biodiversity. We highlight the methodological gaps between the assessment of landscape aesthetics, ecological diversity and functioning. We discuss the challenges associated with connecting landscape aesthetics with ecological value, and the scaling issues in the assessment of human aesthetics perception. To better integrate aesthetic value and ecological components of biodiversity, we propose to combine the study of aesthetics and the understanding of ecological function at both the species and landscape levels. Given the urgent need to engage society in conservation efforts, this approach, based on the combination of the aesthetic experience and the recognition of ecological functioning by the general public, will help change our culture of nature and promote ecologically oriented conservation policies.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2415  
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Auteur Kadowaki, K.; Barbera, C.G.; Godsoe, W.; Delsuc, F.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Predicting biotic interactions and their variability in a changing environment Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 5 Pages (down) 20151073  
  Mots-Clés Bacteria; climate-change; climate change; distribution models; diversity; extinction risk; global change; microcosm; phylogeny; predictive ecology; range; responses; shifts  
  Résumé Global environmental change is altering the patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Observation and theory suggest that species' distributions and abundances depend on a suite of processes, notably abiotic filtering and biotic interactions, both of which are constrained by species' phylogenetic history. Models predicting species distribution have historically mostly considered abiotic filtering and are only starting to integrate biotic interaction. However, using information on present interactions to forecast the future of biodiversity supposes that biotic interactions will not change when species are confronted with new environments. Using bacterial microcosms, we illustrate how biotic interactions can vary along an environmental gradient and how this variability can depend on the phylogenetic distance between interacting species.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1653  
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Auteur Evans, S.M.; McKenna, C.; Simpson, S.D.; Tournois, J.; Genner, M.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Patterns of species range evolution in Indo-Pacific reef assemblages reveal the Coral Triangle as a net source of transoceanic diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 6 Pages (down) 20160090  
  Mots-Clés Bayesian skyline plot; biogeography; climate change; coral reef; fishes global patterns; marine biodiversity; ocean; phylogeography; refugia; species distributions  
  Résumé The Coral Triangle in the Indo-Pacific is a region renowned for exceptional marine biodiversity. The area could have acted as a 'centre of origin' where speciation has been prolific or a 'centre of survival' by providing refuge during major environmental shifts such as sea-level changes. The region could also have acted as a 'centre of accumulation' for species with origins outside of the Coral Triangle, owing to it being at a central position between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Here, we investigated support for these hypotheses using population-level DNA sequence-based reconstructions of the range evolution of 45 species (314 populations) of Indo-Pacific reef-associated organisms. Our results show that populations undergoing the most ancient establishment were significantly more likely to be closer to the centre of the Coral Triangle than to peripheral locations. The data are consistent with the Coral Triangle being a net source of coral-reef biodiversity for the Indo-Pacific region, suggesting that the region has acted primarily as a centre of survival, a centre of origin or both. These results provide evidence of how a key location can influence the large-scale distributions of biodiversity over evolutionary timescales.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1694  
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