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Auteur Henckel, L.; Meynard, C.N.; Devictor, V.; Mouquet, N.; Bretagnolle, V.
Titre On the relative importance of space and environment in farmland bird community assembly Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS One
Volume 14 Numéro 3 Pages (down) e0213360
Mots-Clés beta diversity; dispersal; ecology; habitat; landscape; metacommunity structure; model; patterns; scale; skylarks alauda arvensis
Résumé The relative contribution of ecological processes in shaping metacommunity dynamics in heavily managed landscapes is still unclear. Here we used two complementary approaches to disentangle the role of environment and spatial effect in farmland bird community assembly in an intensive agro-ecosystem. We hypothesized that the interaction between habitat patches and dispersal should play a major role in such unstable and unpredictable environments. First, we used a metacommunity patterns analysis to characterize species co-occurrences and identify the main drivers of community assembly; secondly, variation partitioning was used to disentangle environmental and geographical factors (such as dispersal limitation) on community structure and composition. We used high spatial resolution data on bird community structure and composition distributed among 260 plots in an agricultural landscape. Species were partitioned into functional classes, and point count stations were classified according to landscape characteristics before applying metacommunity and partitioning analyses within each. Overall we could explain around 20% of the variance in species composition in our system, revealing that stochasticity remains very important at this scale. However, this proportion varies depending on the scale of analysis, and reveals potentially important contributions of environmental filtering and dispersal. These conclusions are further reinforced when the analysis was deconstructed by bird functional classes or by landscape habitat classes, underlining trait-related filters, thus reinforcing the idea that wooded areas in these agroecosystems may represent important sources for a specific group of bird species. Our analysis shows that deconstructing the species assemblages into separate functional groups and types of landscapes, along with a combination of analysis strategies, can help in understanding the mechanisms driving community assembly.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2548
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Auteur Cowart, D.A.; Durand, L.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A.; Arnaud-Haond, S.
Titre Investigation of bacterial communities within the digestive organs of the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata provide insights into holobiont geographic clustering Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS One
Volume 12 Numéro 3 Pages (down) e0172543
Mots-Clés alignment; chamber; deposits; diversity; Ecology; microbial community; mid-atlantic ridge; population; sequence data; sp nov.
Résumé Prokaryotic communities forming symbiotic relationships with the vent shrimp, Rimicaris exoculata, are well studied components of hydrothermal ecosystems at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Despite the tight link between host and symbiont, the observed lack of spatial genetic structure seen in R. exoculata contrasts with the geographic differentiation detected in specific bacterial ectosymbionts. The geographic clustering of bacterial lineages within a seemingly panmictic host suggests either the presence of finer scale restriction to gene flow not yet detected in the host, horizontal transmission (environmental selection) of its endosymbionts as a consequence of unique vent geochemistry, or vertically transmitted endosymbionts that exhibit genetic differentiation. To identify which hypothesis best fits, we tested whether bacterial assemblages exhibit differentiation across sites or host populations by performing a 16S rRNA metabarcoding survey on R. exoculata digestive prokaryote samples (n = 31) taken from three geochemically distinct vents across MAR: Rainbow, Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) and Logatchev. Analysis of communities across two organs (digestive tract, stomach), three molt colors (white, red, black) and three life stages (eggs, juveniles, adults) also provided insights into symbiont transmission mode. Examining both whole communities and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) confirmed the presence of three main epibionts: Epsilonproteobacteria, Mollicutes and Deferribacteres. With these findings, we identified a clear pattern of geographic segregation by vent in OTUs assigned to Epsilonproteobacteria. Additionally, we detected evidence for differentiation among all communities associated to vents and life stages. Overall, results suggest a combination of environmental selection and vertical inheritance of some of the symbiotic lineages.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2085
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Auteur Tedesco, P.A.; Beauchard, O.; Bigorne, R.; Blanchet, S.; Buisson, L.; Conti, L.; Cornu, J.-F.; Dias, M.S.; Grenouillet, G.; Hugueny, B.; Jezequel, C.; Leprieur, F.; Brosse, S.; Oberdorff, T.
Titre A global database on freshwater fish species occurrence in drainage basins Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Data
Volume 4 Numéro Pages (down) 170141
Mots-Clés biodiversity; distinctiveness; diversity; faunas; homogenization; patterns; worlds
Résumé A growing interest is devoted to global-scale approaches in ecology and evolution that examine patterns and determinants of species diversity and the threats resulting from global change. These analyses obviously require global datasets of species distribution. Freshwater systems house a disproportionately high fraction of the global fish diversity considering the small proportion of the earth's surface that they occupy, and are one of the most threatened habitats on Earth. Here we provide complete species lists for 3119 drainage basins covering more than 80% of the Earth surface using 14953 fish species inhabiting permanently or occasionally freshwater systems. The database results from an extensive survey of native and non-native freshwater fish species distribution based on 1436 published papers, books, grey literature and web-based sources. Alone or in combination with further datasets on species biological and ecological characteristics and their evolutionary history, this database represents a highly valuable source of information for further studies on freshwater macroecology, macroevolution, biogeography and conservation.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2052-4463 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2204
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Auteur Strauß, A.; Guilhaumon, F.; Randrianiaina, R.D.; Valero, K.C.W.; Vences, M.; Glos, J.
Titre Opposing Patterns of Seasonal Change in Functional and Phylogenetic Diversity of Tadpole Assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Plos One
Volume 11 Numéro 3 Pages (down) e0151744
Mots-Clés Animal phylogenetics; Ecological metrics; Frogs; Phylogenetics; Polynomials; Seasons; species diversity; Tadpoles
Résumé Assemblages that are exposed to recurring temporal environmental changes can show changes in their ecological properties. These can be expressed by differences in diversity and assembly rules. Both can be identified using two measures of diversity: functional (FD) and phylogenetic diversity (PD). Frog communities are understudied in this regard, especially during the tadpole life stage. We utilised tadpole assemblages from Madagascan rainforest streams to test predictions of seasonal changes on diversity and assemblage composition and on diversity measures. From the warm-wet to the cool-dry season, species richness (SR) of tadpole assemblages decreased. Also FD and PD decreased, but FD less and PD more than expected by chance. During the dry season, tadpole assemblages were characterised by functional redundancy (among assemblages—with increasing SR), high FD (compared to a null model), and low PD (phylogenetic clustering; compared to a null model). Although mutually contradictory at first glance, these results indicate competition as tadpole community assembly driving force. This is true during the limiting cool-dry season but not during the more suitable warm-wet season. We thereby show that assembly rules can strongly depend on season, that comparing FD and PD can reveal such forces, that FD and PD are not interchangeable, and that conclusions on assembly rules based on FD alone are critical.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1562
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Auteur Escalas, A.; Catherine, A.; Maloufi, S.; Cellamare, M.; Hamlaoui, S.; Yepremian, C.; Louvard, C.; Troussellier, M.; Bernard, C.
Titre Drivers and ecological consequences of dominance in periurban phytoplankton communities using networks approaches Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Water Res.
Volume 163 Numéro Pages (down) Unsp-114893
Mots-Clés blooms; climate-change; Co-occurrence network; Community cohesion; Community functioning; cooccurrence patterns; cyanobacteria dominance; diversity; Dominance; fresh-waters; lakes; light; Periurban waterbodies; Phytoplankton; resource use efficiency; species richness
Résumé Evaluating the causes and consequences of dominance by a limited number of taxa in phytoplankton communities is of huge importance in the current context of increasing anthropogenic pressures on natural ecosystems. This is of particular concern in densely populated urban areas where usages and impacts of human populations on water ecosystems are strongly interconnected. Microbial biodiversity is commonly used as a bioindicator of environmental quality and ecosystem functioning, but there are few studies at the regional scale that integrate the drivers of dominance in phytoplankton communities and their consequences on the structure and functioning of these communities. Here, we studied the causes and consequences of phytoplankton dominance in 50 environmentally contrasted waterbodies, sampled over four summer campaigns in the highly-populated Ile-de-France region (IDF). Phytoplankton dominance was observed in 32-52% of the communities and most cases were attributed to Chlorophyta (35.5-40.6% of cases) and Cyanobacteria (30.3-36.5%). The best predictors of dominance were identified using multinomial logistic regression and included waterbody features (surface, depth and connection to the hydrological network) and water column characteristics (total N, TN:TP ratio, water temperature and stratification). The consequences of dominance were dependent on the identity of the dominant organisms and included modifications of biological attributes (richness, cohesion) and functioning (biomass, RUE) of phytoplankton communities. We constructed co-occurrence networks using high resolution phytoplankton biomass and demonstrated that networks under dominance by Chlorophyta and Cyanobacteria exhibited significantly different structure compared with networks without dominance. Furthermore, dominance by Cyanobacteria was associated with more profound network modifications (e.g. cohesion, size, density, efficiency and proportion of negative links), suggesting a stronger disruption of the structure and functioning of phytoplankton communities in the conditions in which this group dominates. Finally, we provide a synthesis on the relationships between environmental drivers, dominance status, community attributes and network structure. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0043-1354 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000483006400038 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2636
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