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Auteur Bax, N.J.; Miloslavich, P.; Muller-Karger, F.E.; Allain, V.; Appeltans, W.; Batten, S.D.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L.; Buttigieg, P.L.; Chiba, S.; Costa, D.P.; Duffy, J.E.; Dunn, D.C.; Johnson, C.R.; Kudela, R.M.; Obura, D.; Rebelo, L.-M.; Shin, Y.-J.; Simmons, S.E.; Tyack, P.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre A Response to Scientific and Societal Needs for Marine Biological Observations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés capacity development; Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD); Essential Ocean Variables (EOV); Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS); Ocean observing; Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); Un decade for sustainable development  
  Résumé Development of global ocean observing capacity for the biological EOVs is on the cusp of a step-change. Current capacity to automate data collection and processing and to integrate the resulting data streams with complementary data, openly available as FAIR data, is certain to dramatically increase the amount and quality of information and knowledge available to scientists and decision makers into the future. There is little doubt that scientists will continue to expand their understanding of what lives in the ocean, where it lives and how it is changing. However, whether this expanding information stream will inform policy and management or be incorporated into indicators for national reporting is more uncertain. Coordinated data collection including open sharing of data will help produce the consistent evidence-based messages that are valued by managers. The GOOS Biology and Ecosystems Panel is working with other global initiatives to assist this coordination by defining and implementing Essential Ocean Variables. The biological EOVs have been defined, are being updated following community feedback, and their implementation is underway. In 2019, the coverage and precision of a global ocean observing system capable of addressing key questions for the next decade will be quantified, and its potential to support the goals of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development identified. Developing a global ocean observing system for biology and ecosystems requires parallel efforts in improving evidence-based monitoring of progress against international agreements and the open data, reporting and governance structures that would facilitate the uptake of improved information by decision makers.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2598  
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Auteur Jacquet, C.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Gravel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Extensions of Island Biogeography Theory predict the scaling of functional trait composition with habitat area and isolation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 20 Numéro 2 Pages 135-146  
  Mots-Clés Allometric theory; animal abundance; body-size; body-size distributions; complex food webs; coral-reef fishes; diversity; Ecology; evolution; Food web; global patterns; island biogeography; population-density; species richness; tropical reefs  
  Résumé The Theory of Island Biogeography (TIB) predicts how area and isolation influence species richness equilibrium on insular habitats. However, the TIB remains silent about functional trait composition and provides no information on the scaling of functional diversity with area, an observation that is now documented in many systems. To fill this gap, we develop a probabilistic approach to predict the distribution of a trait as a function of habitat area and isolation, extending the TIB beyond the traditional species-area relationship. We compare model predictions to the body-size distribution of piscivorous and herbivorous fishes found on tropical reefs worldwide. We find that small and isolated reefs have a higher proportion of large-sized species than large and connected reefs. We also find that knowledge of species body-size and trophic position improves the predictions of fish occupancy on tropical reefs, supporting both the allometric and trophic theory of island biogeography. The integration of functional ecology to island biogeography is broadly applicable to any functional traits and provides a general probabilistic approach to study the scaling of trait distribution with habitat area and isolation.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2087  
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Auteur Loiseau, N.; Gaertner, J.-C.; Kulbicki, M.; Mérigot, B.; Legras, G.; Taquet, M.; Gaertner-Mazouni, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Assessing the multicomponent aspect of coral fish diversity: The impact of sampling unit dimensions Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 60 Numéro Pages 815-823  
  Mots-Clés Evenness; Functional diversity; Index sensitivity; Sampling unit dimensions; species richness; Visual censuses  
  Résumé The influence of variations in sampling unit dimensions on the assessment of fish species structuring has been widely documented. However, this issue has been restricted to a very limited range of community and population indices (mainly species richness and density). Here, we have investigated this issue through the analysis of 13 diversity indices related to 3 diversity components (number of species, evenness and functional diversity). We analyzed a large set of 257 standardized underwater visual census (UVC) transects dealing with 254 coral fish species. The sensitivity of the indices to the variation in sampling unit dimensions was studied by comparing a range of 55 couples of transect length and width representing 34 sampling surfaces. We found that the extent and profile of the sensitivity to changes in transect dimensions strongly varied both from one index to another and from one dimension to another (length and width). The most sensitive indices were more strongly impacted by variation in length than width. We also showed that for a fixed transect surface, the couple of chosen length and width may alter the assessment of indices related to each of the three main diversity components studied. Some widely used diversity indices, such as species richness and Shannon index, appeared to be very sensitive to changes in transect length and width. In contrast, while still very little used in coral fish studies, two functional diversity indices (FDiv, FEve), and to a lesser extent an evenness index (Berger–Parker), remained robust in the face of change in sampling dimensions. By showing that the variation in sampling dimensions (length, width and surface) may impact diversity indices in a contrasting manner, we stress the need to take into account the sensitivity of the indices to this criterion in the process of selection of the indices to be analyzed in diversity studies. Finally, we found that 30 m long*5 m wide transects might be a suitable compromise size for assessing the patterns of each of the three major complementary components of coral fish diversity.  
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  ISSN 1470-160x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1320  
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Auteur Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J. doi  openurl
  Titre Standardized ecological indicators to assess aquatic food webs: The ECOIND software plug-in for Ecopath with Ecosim models Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Environ. Modell. Softw.  
  Volume 89 Numéro Pages 120-130  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; Conservation; Ecological standardized indicators; Ecopath with Ecosim; ecospace; Ecosystem indicators; Environmental status; Fisheries management; Food web models; impacts; index; marine ecosystems; Mediterranean Sea; network analysis; ocean; Software plug-in  
  Résumé Ecological indicators are useful tools to analyse and communicate historical changes in ecosystems and plausible future scenarios while evaluating environmental status. Here we introduce a new plug-in to the Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) food web modelling approach, which is widely used to quantitatively describe aquatic ecosystems. The plug-in (ECOIND) calculates standardized ecological indicators. We describe the primary functionality of ECOIND and provide an example of its application in both static and temporal-spatial dynamic modelling, while we highlight several related features including a new taxonomy input database (species traits) and the ability to analyse input uncertainty on output results. ECOIND adds new capabilities to the widely used EwE food web modelling approach and enables broadening its applications into biodiversity and conservation-based frameworks to contribute to integrated ecosystem analyses. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 1364-8152 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2088  
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Auteur Boavida, J.; Becheler, R.; Choquet, M.; Frank, N.; Taviani, M.; Bourillet, J.-F.; Meistertzheim, A.-L.; Grehan, A.; Savini, A.; Arnaud-Haond, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Out of the Mediterranean? Post-glacial colonization pathways varied among cold-water coral species Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 46 Numéro 5 Pages 915-931  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; cold-water corals; computer-program; deep-sea; deep-sea corals; genetic-structure; glacial marine refugia; glacial refugia; growth; in-situ; Last Glacial Maximum; Lophelia pertusa; lophelia-pertusa; Madrepora oculata; marine phylogeography; north-atlantic ocean; software  
  Résumé Aim: To infer cold-water corals' (CWC) post-glacial phylogeography and assess the role of Mediterranean Sea glacial refugia as origins for the recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. Location: Northeastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Taxon: Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata. Methods: We sampled CWC using remotely operated vehicles and one sediment core for coral and sediment dating. We characterized spatial genetic patterns (microsatellites and a nuclear gene fragment) using networks, clustering and measures of genetic differentiation. Results: Inferences from microsatellite and sequence data were congruent, and showed a contrast between the two CWC species. Populations of L. pertusa present a dominant pioneer haplotype, local haplotype radiations and a majority of endemic variation in lower latitudes. Madrepora oculata populations are differentiated across the northeastern Atlantic and genetic lineages are poorly admixed even among neighbouring sites. Conclusions: Our study shows contrasting post-glacial colonization pathways for two key habitat-forming species in the deep sea. The CWC L. pertusa has likely undertaken a long-range (post-glacial) recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic directly from refugia located along southern Europe (Mediterranean Sea or Gulf of Cadiz). In contrast, the stronger genetic differentiation of M. oculata populations mirrors the effects of long-term isolation in multiple refugia. We suggest that the distinct and genetically divergent, refugial populations initiated the post-glacial recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic margins, leading to a secondary contact in the northern range and reaching higher latitudes much later, in the late Holocene. This study highlights the need to disentangle the influences of present-day dispersal and evolutionary processes on the distribution of genetic polymorphisms, to unravel the influence of past and future environmental changes on the connectivity of cosmopolitan deep-sea ecosystems associated with CWC.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000471344900007 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2602  
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