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Auteur (down) Poisot, T.; Canard, E.; Mouillot, D.; Mouquet, N.; Gravel, D.
Titre The dissimilarity of species interaction networks Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 15 Numéro 12 Pages 1353-1361
Mots-Clés food web; metaweb; species interaction networks; β-diversity
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ISSN 1461-0248 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 903
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Auteur (down) Pellissier, L.; Leprieur, F.; Parravicini, V.; Cowman, P.F.; Kulbicki, M.; Litsios, G.; Olsen, S.M.; Wisz, M.S.; Bellwood, D.R.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Quaternary coral reef refugia preserved fish diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Science
Volume 344 Numéro 6187 Pages 1016-1019
Mots-Clés abundance; areas; assembly rules; cradles; global patterns; gradient; hotspots; marine biodiversity; museums; species richness
Résumé The most prominent pattern in global marine biogeography is the biodiversity peak in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Yet the processes that underpin this pattern are still actively debated. By reconstructing global marine paleoenvironments over the past 3 million years on the basis of sediment cores, we assessed the extent to which Quaternary climate fluctuations can explain global variation in current reef fish richness. Comparing global historical coral reef habitat availability with the present-day distribution of 6316 reef fish species, we find that distance from stable coral reef habitats during historical periods of habitat loss explains 62% of the variation in fish richness, outweighing present-day environmental factors. Our results highlight the importance of habitat persistence during periods of climate change for preserving marine biodiversity.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 801
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Auteur (down) Patino, J.; Guilhaumon, F.; Whittaker, R.J.; Triantis, K.A.; Gradstein, S.R.; Hedenas, L.; Gonzalez-Mancebo, J.M.; Vanderpoorten, A.
Titre Accounting for data heterogeneity in patterns of biodiversity: an application of linear mixed effect models to the oceanic island biogeography of spore-producing plants Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 36 Numéro 8 Pages 904-913
Mots-Clés area; bryophytes; diversification; diversity; evolution; genetic-structure; moss; richness; scale; speciation
Résumé The general dynamic model of oceanic island biogeography describes the evolution of species diversity properties, including species richness (SR), through time. We investigate the hypothesis that SR in organisms with high dispersal capacities is better predicted by island area and elevation (as a surrogate of habitat diversity) than by time elapsed since island emergence and geographic isolation. Linear mixed effect models (LMMs) subjected to information theoretic model selection were employed to describe moss and liverwort SR patterns from 67 oceanic islands across 12 archipelagos. Random effects, which are used to modulate model parameters to take differences among archipelagos into account, included only a random intercept in the best-fit model for liverworts and in one of the two best-fit models for mosses. In this case, the other coefficients are constant across archipelagos, and we interpret the intercept as a measure of the intrinsic carrying capacity of islands within each archipelago, independently of their size, age, elevation and geographic isolation. The contribution of area and elevation to the models was substantially higher than that of time, with the least contribution made by measures of geographic isolation. This reinforces the idea that oceanic barriers are not a major impediment for migration in bryophytes and, together with the almost complete absence of in situ insular diversification, explains the comparatively limited importance of time in the models. We hence suggest that time per se has little independent role in explaining bryophyte SR and principally features as a variable accounting for the changing area and topographic complexity during the life-cycle of oceanic islands. Simple area models reflecting habitat availability and diversity might hence prevail over more complex temporal models reflecting in-situ speciation and dispersal (time, geographic connectivity) in explaining patterns of biodiversity for exceptionally mobile organisms.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 432
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Auteur (down) Parravicini, V.; Villeger, S.; McClanahan, T.R.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Bellwood, D.R.; Belmaker, J.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Vigliola, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Global mismatch between species richness and vulnerability of reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 1101-1110
Mots-Clés Vulnerability; biodiversity; biodiversity loss; conservation; coral-reefs; extinction; fisheries; functional diversity; hotspots; macroecology; marine; patterns; protected areas; risk assessment; sensitivity
Résumé The impact of anthropogenic activity on ecosystems has highlighted the need to move beyond the biogeographical delineation of species richness patterns to understanding the vulnerability of species assemblages, including the functional components that are linked to the processes they support. We developed a decision theory framework to quantitatively assess the global taxonomic and functional vulnerability of fish assemblages on tropical reefs using a combination of sensitivity to species loss, exposure to threats and extent of protection. Fish assemblages with high taxonomic and functional sensitivity are often exposed to threats but are largely missed by the global network of marine protected areas. We found that areas of high species richness spatially mismatch areas of high taxonomic and functional vulnerability. Nevertheless, there is strong spatial match between taxonomic and functional vulnerabilities suggesting a potential win-win conservation-ecosystem service strategy if more protection is set in these locations.
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ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 630
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Auteur (down) Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Bellwood, D.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Myers, R.; Vigliola, L.; D'Agata, S.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Global patterns and predictors of tropical reef fish species richness Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 36 Numéro 12 Pages 1254-1262
Mots-Clés Biogeography; constraints; coral-reefs; dispersal; diversity; eastern; gradients; marine biodiversity; ocean; pacific; spatial autocorrelation
Résumé In the marine realm, the tropics host an extraordinary diversity of taxa but the drivers underlying the global distribution of marine organisms are still under scrutiny and we still lack an accurate global predictive model. Using a spatial database for 6336 tropical reef fishes, we attempted to predict species richness according to geometric, biogeographical and environmental explanatory variables. In particular, we aimed to evaluate and disentangle the predictive performances of temperature, habitat area, connectivity, mid-domain effect and biogeographical region on reef fish species richness. We used boosted regression trees, a flexible machine-learning technique, to build our predictive model and structural equation modeling to test for potential mediation effects' among predictors. Our model proved to be accurate, explaining 80% of the total deviance in fish richness using a cross-validated procedure. Coral reef area and biogeographical region were the primary predictors of reef fish species richness, followed by coast length, connectivity, mid-domain effect and sea surface temperature, with interactions between the region and other predictors. Important indirect effects of water temperature on reef fish richness, mediated by coral reef area, were also identified. The relationship between environmental predictors and species richness varied markedly among biogeographical regions. Our analysis revealed that a few easily accessible variables can accurately predict reef fish species richness. They also highlight concerns regarding ongoing environmental declines, with region-specific responses to variation in environmental conditions predicting a variable response to anthropogenic impacts.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 623
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