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Auteur (down) Villeger, S.; Brosse, S.; Mouchet, M.; Mouillot, D.; Vanni, M.J.
Titre Functional ecology of fish: current approaches and future challenges Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Sci.
Volume 79 Numéro 4 Pages 783-801
Mots-Clés biodiversity; centrarchid fishes; coral-reef fishes; dietary-morphological relationships; ecosystem processes; Ecosystem services; fish; food-web; fresh-water fish; functional trait; global change; labrid fishes; life-history strategies; ocean; phosphorus-limitation; population regulation; river
Résumé Fish communities face increasing anthropogenic pressures in freshwater and marine ecosystems that modify their biodiversity and threaten the services they supply to human populations. To address these issues, studies have been increasingly focusing on functions of fish that are linked to their main ecological roles in aquatic ecosystems. Fish are indeed known to control other organisms through predation, mediate nutrient fluxes, and can act as ecosystem engineers. Here for each of the key functions played by fish, we present the functional traits that have already been used to assess them. We include traits measurable from observations on living individuals, morphological features measured on preserved organisms or traits categorized using information from the literature, and we discuss their respective advantages and limitations. We then list future research directions to foster a more complete functional approach for fish ecology that needs to incorporate functional traits describing, food provisioning and cultural services while accounting more frequently for intraspecific variability. Finally, we highlight ecological and evolutionary questions that could be addressed using meta-analyses of large trait databases, and how a trait-based framework could provide valuable insights on the mechanistic links between global changes, functional diversity of fish assemblages, and ecosystem services.
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ISSN 1015-1621 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2211
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Auteur (down) van der Heide, T.; Govers, L.L.; de Fouw, J.; Olff, H.; van der Geest, M.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Piersma, T.; van de Koppel, J.; Silliman, B.R.; Smolders, A.J.P.; van Gils, J.A.
Titre A three-stage symbiosis forms the foundation of seagrass ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Science
Volume 336 Numéro Pages 1432-1434
Mots-Clés mutualistic networks zostera-marina biodiversity bivalves sulfide architecture diversity sediments bacteria mollusca
Résumé Seagrasses evolved from terrestrial plants into marine foundation species around 100 million years ago. Their ecological success, however, remains a mystery because natural organic matter accumulation within the beds should result in toxic sediment sulfide levels. Using a meta-analysis, a field study, and a laboratory experiment, we reveal how an ancient three-stage symbiosis between seagrass, lucinid bivalves, and their sulfide-oxidizing gill bacteria reduces sulfide stress for seagrasses. We found that the bivalve-sulfide-oxidizer symbiosis reduced sulfide levels and enhanced seagrass production as measured in biomass. In turn, the bivalves and their endosymbionts profit from organic matter accumulation and radial oxygen release from the seagrass roots. These findings elucidate the long-term success of seagrasses in warm waters and offer new prospects for seagrass ecosystem conservation.
Adresse [van der Heide, Tjisse; Olff, Han] Univ Groningen, CEES, Community & Conservat Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. [Govers, Laura L.; van Katwijk, Marieke M.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Dept Environm Sci, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Fac Sci, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands. [de Fouw, Jimmy; van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis; van Gils, Jan A.] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, CEES, Anim Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. [van de Koppel, Johan] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Ctr Estuarine & Marine Ecol, NL-4400 AC Yerseke, Netherlands. [Silliman, Brian R.] Univ Florida, Dept Biol, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA. [Smolders, Alfons J. P.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Dept Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, Fac Sci, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands. van der Heide, T (reprint author), Univ Groningen, CEES, Community & Conservat Ecol Grp, POB 11103, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands t.van.der.heide@rug.nl
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ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Médium
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Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: 958BT Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 27 van der Heide, Tjisse Govers, Laura L. de Fouw, Jimmy Olff, Han van der Geest, Matthijs van Katwijk, Marieke M. Piersma, Theunis van de Koppel, Johan Silliman, Brian R. Smolders, Alfons J. P. van Gils, Jan A. “Waddenfonds” program; Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO)-WOTRO[W.01.65.221.00]; NWO-VIDI[864.09.002]; NSF; Andrew Mellon Foundation; Royal Netherlands Academy We thank G. Quaintenne and H. Blanchet for their help with the collection of Loripes; J. Eygensteyn and E. Pierson for technical assistance; and G. J. Vermeij, H. de Kroon, T. J. Bouma, E. J. Weerman, and C. Smit for their comments on the manuscript. T.v.d.H. was financially supported by the “Waddenfonds” program; M.v.d.G. and T.P. by the Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO)-WOTRO Integrated Programme grant W.01.65.221.00 awarded to T.P.; and J.d.F. and J.v.G. by the NWO-VIDI grant 864.09.002 awarded to J.v.G. B.S. was supported by an NSF CAREER award, the Andrew Mellon Foundation, and the Royal Netherlands Academy Visiting Professorship. The authors declare no conflicts of interest. A detailed description of all materials and methods, sources, as well as supplementary information are available as supplementary materials. The data are deposited in DRYAD at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.210mp. Amer assoc advancement science Washington Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 734 collection 1381
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Auteur (down) Turon, V.; Trably, E.; Fayet, A.; Fouilland, E.; Steyer, J.-P.
Titre Raw dark fermentation effluent to support heterotrophic microalgae growth: microalgae successfully outcompete bacteria for acetate Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Algal Research
Volume 12 Numéro Pages 119-125
Mots-Clés Bacterial diversity; Biohydrogen; Chlorella sorokiniana; Dark fermentation; Heterotrophic cultivation; Volatile fatty acids (VFAs)
Résumé Coupling dark fermentation (DF), which produces hydrogen from diverse effluents or solid waste, and heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae, which produces lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, is a promising and innovative solution for developing sustainable biorefineries. The use of a raw DF effluent, containing acetate and butyrate, to support the heterotrophic growth of Chlorella sorokiniana was investigated. All the acetate in sterilized and unsterilized DF effluent was exhausted in less than three days of heterotrophic cultivation, whereas butyrate was not used by the microalgae. The microalgae biomass reached 0.33 g L− 1 with a carbon yield on acetate of 55%. The algal yield was higher than previously reported for synthetic DF effluent. It was concluded that compounds other than volatile fatty acids were present in the DF effluent and these could be consumed by the microalgae. After the acetate had been exhausted, butyrate was consumed by facultative and strict aerobic bacteria originating from the DF effluent. The concentration of the bacterial community increased during the experiment but did not have any significant impact on heterotrophic microalgae growth. A high microalgal biomass yield was achieved without requiring the DF effluent to be sterilized.
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ISSN 2211-9264 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1447
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Auteur (down) Tribot, A.-S.; Mouquet, N.; Villeger, S.; Raymond, M.; Hoff, F.; Boissery, P.; Holon, F.; Deter, J.
Titre Taxonomic and functional diversity increase the aesthetic value of coralligenous reefs Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep
Volume 6 Numéro Pages 34229
Mots-Clés assemblages; beauty; biodiversity; color preference; Ecology; ecosystem; growth; indexes; knowledge; landscape
Résumé The aesthetic value of landscapes contributes to human well-being. However, studies which have investigated the link between biodiversity and ecosystem services have not taken aesthetic value into account. In this study we evaluated how the aesthetics of coralligenous reefs, a key marine ecosystem in the Mediterranean, is perceived by the general public and how aesthetic preferences are related to biodiversity facets (taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversities). We performed both biodiversity measures and online-surveys of aesthetic perception on photographic quadrats sampled along the French Mediterranean coast. Our results show that species richness and functional richness have a significant positive effect on aesthetic value. Most of the ecological literature, exploring the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning and service has focused so far on 'economical' aspects of biodiversity (provision or regulation). Our results illustrate that cultural facets, such as 'beauty', should also be central in our motivations to preserve ecological diversity.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1688
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Auteur (down) Tribot, A.-S.; Deter, J.; Mouquet, N.
Titre Integrating the aesthetic value of landscapes and biological diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.
Volume 285 Numéro 1886 Pages 20180971
Mots-Clés aesthetic value; biodiversity; conservation; ecological functioning; ecosystem services; increase; indicators; landscape ecology; perception; preferences; quality; species richness; urban green-space
Résumé As a cultural ecosystem service, the aesthetic value of landscapes contributes to human well-being, but studies linking biodiversity and ecosystem services generally do not account for this particular service. Therefore, congruence between the aesthetic perception of landscapes, ecological value and biodiversity remains poorly understood. Here, we describe the conceptual background, current methodologies and future challenges of assessing landscape aesthetics and its relationship with biodiversity. We highlight the methodological gaps between the assessment of landscape aesthetics, ecological diversity and functioning. We discuss the challenges associated with connecting landscape aesthetics with ecological value, and the scaling issues in the assessment of human aesthetics perception. To better integrate aesthetic value and ecological components of biodiversity, we propose to combine the study of aesthetics and the understanding of ecological function at both the species and landscape levels. Given the urgent need to engage society in conservation efforts, this approach, based on the combination of the aesthetic experience and the recognition of ecological functioning by the general public, will help change our culture of nature and promote ecologically oriented conservation policies.
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ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2415
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