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Auteur (down) Zupan, L.; Cabeza, M.; Maiorano, L.; Roquet, C.; Devictor, V.; Lavergne, S.; Mouillot, D.; Mouquet, N.; Renaud, J.; Thuiller, W.
Titre Spatial mismatch of phylogenetic diversity across three vertebrate groups and protected areas in Europe Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity and Distributions
Volume 20 Numéro 6 Pages 674-685
Mots-Clés Europe; Species diversity; approach; biodiversity; climate-change; communities; ecological; evolutionary diversity; functional diversity; global patterns; hotspots; nature conservation; phylogenetic diversity; protected areas; spatial biodiversity congruence; species richness; terrestrial vertebrates; unified
Résumé Aim We investigate patterns of phylogenetic diversity in relation to species diversity for European birds, mammals and amphibians to evaluate their congruence and highlight areas of particular evolutionary history. We estimate the extent to which the European network of protected areas (PAs) network retains interesting evolutionary history areas for the three groups separately and simultaneously. Location Europe Methods Phylogenetic (QE(PD)) and species diversity (SD) were estimated using the Rao's quadratic entropy at 10 ' resolution. We determined the regional relationship between QE(PD) and SD for each taxa with a spatial regression model and used the tails of the residuals (QE(RES)) distribution to identify areas of higher and lower QE(PD) than predicted. Spatial congruence of biodiversity between groups was assessed with Pearson correlation coefficient. A simple classification scheme allowed building a convergence map where a convergent pixel equalled to a QE(RES) value of the same sign for the three groups. This convergence map was overlaid to the current PAs network to estimate the level of protection in convergent pixels and compared it to a null expectation built on 1000 randomization of PAs over the landscape. Results QE(RES) patterns across vertebrates show a strong spatial mismatch highlighting different evolutionary histories. Convergent areas represent only 2.7% of the Western Palearctic, with only 8.4% of these areas being covered by the current PAs network while a random distribution would retain 10.4% of them. QE(RES) are unequally represented within PAs: areas with higher QE(PD) than predicted are better covered than expected, while low QE(PD) areas are undersampled. Main conclusions Patterns of diversity strongly diverge between groups of vertebrates in Europe. Although Europe has the world's most extensive PAs network, evolutionary history of terrestrial vertebrates is unequally protected. The challenge is now to reconcile effective conservation planning with a contemporary view of biodiversity integrating multiple facets.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 856
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Auteur (down) Zubia, M.; De Clerck, O.; Leliaert, F.; Payri, C.; Mattio, L.; Vieira, C.; Cambert, H.; Quod, J.P.; Loiseau, N.; Golubic, S.; Lin, S.-M.; Liu, S.-L.; Pinault, M.
Titre Diversity and assemblage structure of tropical marine flora on lava flows of different ages Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Bot.
Volume 144 Numéro Pages 20-30
Mots-Clés climate-change; coral-reefs; Reunion island; Cyanobacteria; phase-shifts; cyanobacterial diversity; Ecological succession; eparses scattered islands; genus lobophora dictyotales; Macroalgae; mozambique channel; Piton de la fournaise; reunion island; volcanic habitats; western indian-ocean
Résumé Recent volcanic lava flows extending into the ocean represent an ideal opportunity to study the long-term successional development of marine floral assemblages on the bare new substratum. We describe the floral assemblages of nine lava flows of different ages (prehistoric to 2007) at Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion Island, Indian Ocean) based on a survey of 37 stations. We identified 159 species including 148 macroalgae, 1 seagrass, and 10 cyanobacteria. Fifty-one of those represent new records for Reunion Island, and at least 9 taxa were identified as new to science. Recent lava flows were characterized by the dominance of ephemeral, opportunistic species, such as Pseudobryopsis hainanensis and Acrocladus dotyanus, while prehistoric lava flows were mainly characterized by perennial species, particularly Sargassum portiericuzum and Turbinaria ornata. A canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the environmental factor that most significantly correlated to the variation in floral assemblages was the distance to the most recent lava flow (2007). This factor was also highly correlated to coral cover. The composition of the different floral assemblages is discussed in relation to abiotic and biotic factors to explain ecological succession in a tropical environment.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0304-3770 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2259
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Auteur (down) Zhao, T.; Villeger, S.; Cucherousset, J.
Titre Accounting for intraspecific diversity when examining relationships between non-native species and functional diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Oecologia
Volume 189 Numéro 1 Pages 171-183
Mots-Clés fish; Intraspecific variability; size; disturbance; Non-native species; phenotypic plasticity; Functional diversity; reveals; catfish silurus-glanis; coexistence; Community assembly; energy relationships; Functional traits; success; trait variability
Résumé Quantifying changes in functional diversity, the facet of biodiversity accounting for the biological features of organisms, has been advocated as one of the most integrative ways to unravel how communities are affected by human-induced perturbations. The present study assessed how functional diversity patterns varied among communities that differed in the degree to which non-native species dominated the community in temperate lake fish communities and whether accounting for intraspecific functional variability could provide a better understanding of the variation of functional diversity across communities. Four functional diversity indices were computed for 18 temperate lake fish communities along a gradient of non-native fish dominance using morphological functional traits assessed for each life-stage within each species. First, we showed that intraspecific variability in functional traits was high and comparable to interspecific variability. Second, we found that non-native fish were functionally distinct from native fish. Finally, we demonstrated that there was a significant relationship between functional diversity and the degree to which non-native fish currently dominated the community and that this association could be better detected when accounting for intraspecific functional variability. These findings highlighted the importance of incorporating intraspecific variability to better quantify the variation of functional diversity patterns in communities facing human-induced perturbations.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2479
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Auteur (down) Wasof, S.; Lenoir, J.; Hattab, T.; Jamoneau, A.; Gallet-Moron, E.; Ampoorter, E.; Saguez, R.; Bennsadek, L.; Bertrand, R.; Valdes, A.; Verheyen, K.; Decocq, G.
Titre Dominance of individual plant species is more important than diversity in explaining plant biomass in the forest understorey Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Veg. Sci.
Volume 29 Numéro 3 Pages 521-531
Mots-Clés biodiversity; biomass; biomass ratio hypothesis; community biomass; current knowledge; deciduous forests; ecosystem productivity; forest understorey; functional diversity; ivy; multiple traits; niche conservatism; phylogenetic diversity; phylogeny; production; richness
Résumé QuestionsHow does plant community diversity influence variation in plant biomass? There are two competing hypotheses: the biomass ratio' hypothesis, where biomass is influenced by the abundance and traits of the most dominant species, and the diversity' hypothesis, where the diversity of organisms influences biomass through mechanisms such as niche complementarity. However, no studies have tested which one of these two hypotheses better explains the variation in plant biomass in the forest understorey. LocationTemperate deciduous forests in northern France. MethodsFor the forest understorey, we assessed species diversity and biomass as well as soil and light conditions in 133 forest plots of 100m(2) each. Using mixed-effect models and after controlling for potential confounding factors, we tested the biomass ratio' hypothesis by relating the relative abundance of the most dominant species across our study sites and the CWM of plant traits (leaf area and plant height) to biomass. The diversity' hypothesis was tested by relating biomass to various measures of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity. ResultsBiomass of the forest understorey was mainly related to the relative abundance and the trait values of the most dominant species, supporting the biomass ratio' hypothesis. In contrast to the diversity' hypothesis, functional diversity indices had a negative impact on biomass. We found no contribution of taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity indices. ConclusionThe abundance and traits of the most dominant species matter more than taxonomic, functional or phylogenetic diversity of the forest understorey in explaining its biomass. Thus, there is a need for experiments that aim to fully understand keystone species' responses to on-going changing biotic and abiotic conditions and to predict their effects on ecosystem functioning and processes.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1100-9233 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2397
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Auteur (down) Violle, C.; Thuiller, W.; Mouquet, N.; Munoz, F.; Kraft, N.J.B.; Cadotte, M.W.; Livingstone, S.W.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Functional Rarity: The Ecology of Outliers Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Trends Ecol. Evol.
Volume 32 Numéro 5 Pages 356-367
Mots-Clés biodiversity; community ecology; Conservation; ecosystem function; intraspecific variability; niche; phylogenetic diversity; plant-communities; spatial mismatch; trait
Résumé Rarity has been a central topic for conservation and evolutionary biologists aiming to determine the species characteristics that cause extinction risk. More recently, beyond the rarity of species, the rarity of functions or functional traits, called functional rarity, has gained momentum in helping to understand the impact of biodiversity decline on ecosystem functioning. However, a conceptual framework for defining and quantifying functional rarity is still lacking. We introduce 12 different forms of functional rarity along gradients of species scarcity and trait distinctiveness. We then highlight the potential key role of functional rarity in the long-term and large-scale maintenance of ecosystem processes, as well as the necessary linkage between functional and evolutionary rarity.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2131
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