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Auteur Abgrall, C.; Chauvat, M.; Langlois, E.; Hedde, M.; Mouillot, D.; Salmon, S.; Winck, B.; Forey, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Shifts and linkages of functional diversity between above- and below-ground compartments along a flooding gradient Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Funct. Ecol.  
  Volume 31 Numéro 2 Pages 350-360  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community assembly; community ecology; disturbance; divergence; environmental gradient; feeding guilds; functional traits; microarthropod communities; null models; patterns; plant; plant communities; soil collembola; soil-plant interactions; species traits; trait convergence and trait divergence  
  Résumé (up) 1. Trait-based approaches have the potential to reveal general and predictive relationships between organisms and ecosystem functioning. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional structure of communities are still unclear. Within terrestrial ecosystems, several studies have shown that many ecological processes are controlled by the interacting above-and belowground compartments. However, few studies have used traits to reveal the functional relationships between plants and soil fauna. Mostly, research combining plants and soil fauna solely used the traits of one assemblage in predictive studies. 2. Above-ground (plants) and below-ground (Collembola) compartments were sampled over a flooding gradient in northern France along the Seine River. First, we measured the effect of flooding on functional and taxonomic assembly within both communities. We then considered the linkages between plant and Collembolan species richness, community traits and assessed whether traits of both compartments converged at high flooding intensity (abiotic filtering) and diverged when this constraint is released (biotic filtering). 3. Species richness of both taxa followed the same bell-shaped pattern along the gradient, while a similar significant pattern of functional richness was only observed for plants. Further analyses revealed a progressive shift from trait convergence to divergence for plants, but not for Collembola, as constraints intensity decreased. Instead, our results highlighted that Collembola traits were mainly linked to the variations in plant traits. This leads, within Collembola assemblages, to convergence of a subset of perception and habitat-related traits for which the relationship with plant traits was assessed. 4. Synthesis. Using a trait-based approach, our study highlighted that functional relationships occur between above-and below-ground compartments. We underlined that functional composition of plant communities plays a key role in structuring Collembola assemblages in addition to the role of abiotic variables. Our study clearly shows that functional diversity provides a new approach to link the above-and below-ground compartments and might, therefore, be further considered when studying ecological processes at the interface between both compartments.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2091  
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Auteur Tedesco, P.A.; Beauchard, O.; Bigorne, R.; Blanchet, S.; Buisson, L.; Conti, L.; Cornu, J.-F.; Dias, M.S.; Grenouillet, G.; Hugueny, B.; Jezequel, C.; Leprieur, F.; Brosse, S.; Oberdorff, T. doi  openurl
  Titre A global database on freshwater fish species occurrence in drainage basins Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Data  
  Volume 4 Numéro Pages 170141  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; distinctiveness; diversity; faunas; homogenization; patterns; worlds  
  Résumé (up) A growing interest is devoted to global-scale approaches in ecology and evolution that examine patterns and determinants of species diversity and the threats resulting from global change. These analyses obviously require global datasets of species distribution. Freshwater systems house a disproportionately high fraction of the global fish diversity considering the small proportion of the earth's surface that they occupy, and are one of the most threatened habitats on Earth. Here we provide complete species lists for 3119 drainage basins covering more than 80% of the Earth surface using 14953 fish species inhabiting permanently or occasionally freshwater systems. The database results from an extensive survey of native and non-native freshwater fish species distribution based on 1436 published papers, books, grey literature and web-based sources. Alone or in combination with further datasets on species biological and ecological characteristics and their evolutionary history, this database represents a highly valuable source of information for further studies on freshwater macroecology, macroevolution, biogeography and conservation.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2052-4463 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2204  
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Auteur Cucherousset, J.; Villeger, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Quantifying the multiple facets of isotopic diversity: New metrics for stable isotope ecology Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 56 Numéro Pages 152-160  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; Bioindication; communities; diversity indices; food web; Populations; stable isotope analyses; Trophic diversity  
  Résumé (up) Abstract

Stable isotope analyses have emerged as an insightful tool for ecologists, with quantitative methods being developed to analyse data at the population, community and food web levels. In parallel, functional ecologists have developed metrics to quantify the multiple facets of functional diversity in a n-dimensional space based on functional traits. Here, we transferred and adapted metrics developed by functional ecologists into a set of four isotopic diversity metrics (isotopic divergence, dispersion, evenness and uniqueness) complementary to the existing metrics. Specifically, these new metrics are mathematically independent of the number of organisms analysed and account for the abundance of organisms. They can also be calculated with more than two stable isotopes. In addition, we also provide a procedure for calculating the levels of isotopic overlap (similarity and turnover) between two groups of organisms. These metrics have been implemented into new functions in R made freely available to users and we illustrated their application using stable isotope values from a freshwater fish community. Transferring the framework developed initially for measuring functional diversity to stable isotope ecology will allow more efficient assessments of changes in the multiple facets of isotopic diversity following anthropogenic disturbances.
 
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  ISSN 1470-160x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1361  
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Auteur Leitao, R.P.; Zuanon, J.; Mouillot, D.; Leal, C.G.; Hughes, R.M.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Villeger, S.; Pompeu, P.S.; Kasper, D.; de Paula, F.R.; Ferraz, S.F.B.; Gardner, T.A. doi  openurl
  Titre Disentangling the pathways of land use impacts on the functional structure of fish assemblages in Amazon streams Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 41 Numéro 1 Pages 219-232  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; diversity; responses; habitat; community structure; fresh-water fish; aquatic vertebrates; deforestation; ecosystem processes; multiple spatial scales  
  Résumé (up) Agricultural land use is a primary driver of environmental impacts on streams. However, the causal processes that shape these impacts operate through multiple pathways and at several spatial scales. This complexity undermines the development of more effective management approaches, and illustrates the need for more in-depth studies to assess the mechanisms that determine changes in stream biodiversity. Here we present results of the most comprehensive multi-scale assessment of the biological condition of streams in the Amazon to date, examining functional responses of fish assemblages to land use. We sampled fish assemblages from two large human-modified regions, and characterized stream conditions by physical habitat attributes and key landscape-change variables, including density of road crossings (i.e. riverscape fragmentation), deforestation, and agricultural intensification. Fish species were functionally characterized using ecomorphological traits describing feeding, locomotion, and habitat preferences, and these traits were used to derive indices that quantitatively describe the functional structure of the assemblages. Using structural equation modeling, we disentangled multiple drivers operating at different spatial scales, identifying causal pathways that significantly affect stream condition and the structure of the fish assemblages. Deforestation at catchment and riparian network scales altered the channel morphology and the stream bottom structure, changing the functional identity of assemblages. Local deforestation reduced the functional evenness of assemblages (i.e. increased dominance of specific trait combinations) mediated by expansion of aquatic vegetation cover. Riverscape fragmentation reduced functional richness, evenness and divergence, suggesting a trend toward functional homogenization and a reduced range of ecological niches within assemblages following the loss of regional connectivity. These results underscore the often-unrecognized importance of different land use changes, each of which can have marked effects on stream biodiversity. We draw on the relationships observed herein to suggest priorities for the improved management of stream systems in the multiple-use landscapes that predominate in human-modified tropical forests.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2252  
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Auteur Pool, T.K.; Cucherousset, J.; Boulêtreau, S.; Villeger, S.; Strecker, A.L.; Grenouillet, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Increased taxonomic and functional similarity does not increase the trophic similarity of communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 25 Numéro 1 Pages 46-54  
  Mots-Clés Alpha diversity; Beta diversity; compositional similarity; functional diversity; trophic diversity  
  Résumé (up) Aim Despite a long-standing research interest in the association between the biodiversity (i.e. taxonomic and functional composition) and trophic structure of communities, our understanding of the relationship remains limited. Community assembly theory predicts that niche partitioning will result in communities with a diverse array of functional traits, which in turn may facilitate a correspondingly diverse array of trophic interactions that define the trophic niche of those communities. The aim of our study is to test this prediction. Location North America. Methods We built a database composed of functional traits and stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) for 63 freshwater fish communities containing 109 species in 34 lentic and 29 lotic ecosystems. First, using linear mixed models (i.e. an alpha-diversity approach), we tested whether the taxonomic diversity of communities was positively associated with their functional diversity and if their functional diversity was positively associated with their trophic diversity. Second, we assessed the taxonomic, functional and trophic similarity of communities using multiple regression on distance matrices (MRM) and their respective ‘turnover’ and ‘nestedness-resultant’ components to test if the taxonomic similarity of communities was positively correlated with their functional similarity and if their functional similarity was positively associated with their trophic similarity (i.e. a beta-diversity approach). Results We found that the functional diversity of communities increased as their taxonomic diversity increased. Similarly, the trophic diversity of communities increased as their functional diversity increased. The pairwise taxonomic and functional similarity of communities were also positively associated, but there was a weak relationship between the functional and trophic similarities of communities. Main conclusions Our study demonstrates that communities with similar functional characteristics can have disparate food web structures, suggesting that additional site-specific factors influence community variation in trophic niche geometry. Determining the relative importance of functional characteristics and site-specific factors in shaping trophic interactions is crucial for a better understanding of how future species loss and species introductions will affect food web structure and ecosystem functioning.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1540  
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