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Auteur Loiseau, N.; Legras, G.; Kulbicki, M.; Mérigot, B.; Harmelin-Vivien, M.; Mazouni, N.; Galzin, R.; Gaertner, J.C.
Titre Multi-component β-diversity approach reveals conservation dilemma between species and functions of coral reef fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 44 Numéro 3 Pages 537-547
Mots-Clés assemblages; Beta diversity; Beta-diversity; biodiversity; climate; coral reef fish; environmental dissimilarity; functional diversity; global patterns; models; nestedness; null; partitioning; turnover; vulnerability
Résumé (up) AimWe applied a multicomponent approach based on the decomposition of taxonomic (both presence-absence and abundance) and functional beta diversity to determine the influence of ecological factors in shaping spatial distribution diversity of coral reef fishes, and the implications for conservation decisions. LocationLagoons of ten atolls characterized by low human pressure but with contrasted geomorphology in the Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia. MethodsWe computed beta diversities and their partitioning components, both at local (inter-transect, from 200m to 10km) and large (among atolls, from 22 to 350km) spatial scales. Null models were applied to test whether the observed beta diversity differed from random expectation. Multiple generalized dissimilarity models were run to test which environmental factors were the best predictors of observed beta diversities. ResultsBeta diversity was indistinguishable from randomness at both spatial scales. Species remained generally interchangeable among transects within an atoll and to some extent among atolls. However, strong deviance explained by models showed that the number of species, the number of individuals and functional traits present in transects and atolls were determined by deterministic factors (i.e. environmental factors). Modelling each beta diversity component separately also revealed partial mismatch among atolls and among species and functional dissimilarities. The influence of environmental variables strongly varied among atolls, species and functional dissimilarities. Main conclusionsBy revealing the spatial scaling of ecological factors and partial congruence among species and functional diversity, assessment of beta diversity provides insight into conservation planning. Our results support the idea that conservation planning applied to protect taxonomic diversity cannot be fully extended to functional diversity. We have addressed the dilemma of which diversity component should be favoured in conservation strategies.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2117
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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S.
Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857
Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics
Résumé (up) AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627
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Auteur Mouillot, D.; Parravicini, V.; Bellwood, D.R.; Leprieur, F.; Huang, D.; Cowman, P.F.; Albouy, C.; Hughes, T.P.; Thuiller, W.; Guilhaumon, F.
Titre Global marine protected areas do not secure the evolutionary history of tropical corals and fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages 10359
Mots-Clés Biodiversity; conservation; extinction risk; functional diversity; management; patterns; phylogenetic diversity; reef fisheries; species richness; vulnerability
Résumé (up) Although coral reefs support the largest concentrations of marine biodiversity worldwide, the extent to which the global system of marine-protected areas (MPAs) represents individual species and the breadth of evolutionary history across the Tree of Life has never been quantified. Here we show that only 5.7% of scleractinian coral species and 21.7% of labrid fish species reach the minimum protection target of 10% of their geographic ranges within MPAs. We also estimate that the current global MPA system secures only 1.7% of the Tree of Life for corals, and 17.6% for fishes. Regionally, the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific show the greatest deficit of protection for corals while for fishes this deficit is located primarily in the Western Indian Ocean and in the Central Pacific. Our results call for a global coordinated expansion of current conservation efforts to fully secure the Tree of Life on coral reefs.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1506
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Auteur Pommier, T.; Douzery, E.J.P.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Environment drives high phylogenetic turnover among oceanic bacterial communities Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.
Volume 8 Numéro 4 Pages 562-566
Mots-Clés Biogeography; connectivity; diversity; dynamics; patterns; phylogenetic turnover
Résumé (up) Although environmental filtering has been observed to influence the biodiversity patterns of marine bacterial communities, it was restricted to the regional scale and to the species level, leaving the main drivers unknown at large biogeographic scales and higher taxonomic levels. Bacterial communities with different species compositions may nevertheless share phylogenetic lineages, and phylogenetic turnover (PT) among those communities may be surprisingly low along any biogeographic or environmental gradient. Here, we investigated the relative influence of environmental filtering and geographical distance on the PT between marine bacterial communities living more than 8000 km apart in contrasted abiotic conditions. PT was high between communities and was more structured by local environmental factors than by geographical distance, suggesting the predominance of a lineage filtering process. Strong phenotype-environment mismatches observed in the ocean may surpass high connectivity between marine microbial communities.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 567
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Auteur D'agata, S.; Mouillot, D.; Wantiez, L.; Friedlander, A.M.; Kulbicki, M.; Vigliola, L.
Titre Marine reserves lag behind wilderness in the conservation of key functional roles Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages 12000
Mots-Clés biodiversity; coral-reef fishes; diversity indexes; ecosystem; new-caledonia; population-density; protected areas; species richness; visual-census; vulnerability
Résumé (up) Although marine reserves represent one of the most effective management responses to human impacts, their capacity to sustain the same diversity of species, functional roles and biomass of reef fishes as wilderness areas remains questionable, in particular in regions with deep and long-lasting human footprints. Here we show that fish functional diversity and biomass of top predators are significantly higher on coral reefs located at more than 20 h travel time from the main market compared with even the oldest (38 years old), largest (17,500 ha) and most restrictive (no entry) marine reserve in New Caledonia (South-Western Pacific). We further demonstrate that wilderness areas support unique ecological values with no equivalency as one gets closer to humans, even in large and well-managed marine reserves. Wilderness areas may therefore serve as benchmarks for management effectiveness and act as the last refuges for the most vulnerable functional roles.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1625
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