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Auteur Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J.; Lasram, F.B.; Mouillot, D.; Cury, P.
Titre 'Low-hanging fruit' for conservation of marine vertebrate species at risk in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Frontiers in Microbiology Revue Abrégée
Volume 24 Numéro 2 Pages 226-239
Mots-Clés Conservation priorities; cumulative threats; IUCN diversities; marine biodiversity; Marine Protected Areas; Mediterranean Sea
Résumé (up) AimConservation priorities need to take the feasibility of protection measures into account. In times of economic pressure it is essential to identify the low-hanging fruit' for conservation: areas where human impacts are lower and biological diversity is still high, and thus conservation is more feasible. LocationWe used the Mediterranean large marine ecosystem (LME) as a case study to identify the overlapping areas of low threats and high diversity of vertebrate species at risk. MethodsThis LME is the first in the world to have a complete regional IUCN Red List assessment of the native marine fish. We augmented these data with distributions of marine mammals, marine turtles and seabirds at risk, and we calculated the spatial distributions of species at risk (IUCN densities). Using cumulative threats we identified priority areas for conservation of species at risk' (PACS), where IUCN diversities are high and threats are low. We assessed whether IUCN diversities and PACS were spatially congruent among taxa and we quantified whether PACS corresponded to current and proposed protected areas. ResultsIUCN densities and PACS were not highly correlated spatially among taxa. Continental shelves and deep-sea slopes of the Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean and Tunisian Plateau/Gulf of Sidra are identified as relevant for fish species at risk. The eastern side of the western Mediterranean and the Adriatic Sea are identified as most relevant for endemic fish, and shelf and open sea areas distributed through the LME are most important for marine mammals and turtles at risk, while specific locations of the western Mediterranean Sea and the Aegean and Levantine seas are highlighted for seabirds. Main conclusionsLarge parts of the areas of PACS fell outside current or proposed frameworks to be prioritized for conservation. PACS may be suitable candidates for contributing to the 10% protection target for the Mediterranean Sea by 2020.
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Auteur Descombes, P.; Leprieur, F.; Albouy, C.; Heine, C.; Pellissier, L.
Titre Spatial imprints of plate tectonics on extant richness of terrestrial vertebrates Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 44 Numéro 5 Pages 1185-1197
Mots-Clés american biotic interchange; amphibian; andean uplift; bird; climate-change; continental drift; diversification rates; diversity; global patterns; indo-pacific; large-scale patterns; madagascar; mammal; plate tectonics; sea-level; Southeast Asia; species richness; Wallace line; wallaces line
Résumé (up) AimIn interaction with past climate changes, it is likely that plate tectonics contributed to the shaping of current global species diversity, but so far this has not been statistically quantified at the global level. Here, we tested whether plate tectonics since the breakup of Gondwana left an imprint on current patterns of species richness of amphibians, birds and mammals. LocationGlobal. MethodsWe reconstructed the absolute positions of continental plates since the Early Cretaceous and used this information to derive variables of latitudinal shifts and potential exchanges among landmasses that could have modulated species richness. Using a multi-model inference approach combining both contemporary and historical variables, we quantified the relative importance of variables related to plate tectonics in explaining the spatial variation of the richness of amphibians, birds and mammals. Next, we employed a moving window approach to test whether plate tectonics left a more marked imprint in specific regions. ResultsPlatetectonics left an imprint on current patterns of vertebrate species richness in geologically singular regions, especially in the Indo-Australian Archipelago and the region comprising eastern Africa and Madagascar. For birds and mammals, but not amphibians, we found a marked contrast in species richness across Australia and Southeast Asia and eastern Africa and Madagascar associated with plate tectonics. Moreover, the relationship between species richness and plate tectonics varied across taxonomic orders for birds and mammals. Main conclusionsWhile no general imprint of plate tectonics was detected at the global scale, our regional analysis highlighted a substantial role of geodynamics in shaping current patterns of vertebrate species richness in Southeast Asia and Madagascar. Future studies should integrate the full range of processes associated with plate tectonics, including orogeny, not considered here.
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ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2129
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Auteur Mouillot, D.; De Bortoli, J.; Leprieur, F.; Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Bellwood, D.R.
Titre The challenge of delineating biogeographical regions: nestedness matters for Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography
Volume 40 Numéro 12 Pages 2228-2237
Mots-Clés -diversity; Archipelago; Coral Triangle; Indo-Australian; Pae; beta-diversity; biodiversity hotspots; conservation; delineation; dissimilarity; dung beetles; endemicity; evolutionary history; global; historical biogeography; nestedness; parsimony analysis; partitioning; patterns; reef fish assemblages; spatial-patterns; turnover
Résumé (up) AimThe delineation of regions is a critical procedure in biogeography, but there is still no consensus about the best approach. Traditionally, a compositional dissimilarity index and a clustering algorithm are used to partition locations into regions. However, the choice of index and algorithm may have a profound impact on the final result, particularly when locations display different levels of species richness and when they are nested within each other. Our objective was to estimate the influence of species nestedness among locations on the delineation of biogeographical regions. LocationAs a case study, we used coral reef fishes (families Chaetodontidae, Pomacentridae and Labridae) from the Indo-Pacific, where a large richness gradient extends, often as a series of nested assemblages, from the species-rich Indo-Australian Archipelago (Coral Triangle) to species-poor peripheral locations. MethodsWe used the turnover and nestedness components of the SOrensen and Jaccard dissimilarity indices to estimate the effect of nestedness on the delineation of biogeographical regions. In addition, we compared the results with those obtained using a parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE). ResultsLow Mantel correlation values revealed that the PAE method assembled locations in a very different way than methods based on dissimilarity indices for Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes. We also found that nestedness mattered when delineating biogeographical units because, for both the SOrensen and the Jaccard indices, reef fish assemblages were grouped differently depending on whether we used the turnover component of each index or the complete index, including the nestedness component. The turnover component ignored variation in species richness attributable to differences in habitat area between locations, and permitted a delineation based solely on species replacement. Main conclusionsWe demonstrate that the choice of the component used to measure dissimilarity between species assemblages is critical, because it may strongly influence regional delineations, at least for Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes. We conclude that the two components of the dissimilarity indices can reveal complementary insights into the role that history may have played in shaping extant patterns of biodiversity.
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ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 879
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Auteur Barnagaud, J.-Y.; Kissling, W.D.; Tsirogiannis, C.; Fisikopoulos, V.; Villeger, S.; Sekercioglu, C.H.; Svenning, J.-C.
Titre Biogeographical, environmental and anthropogenic determinants of global patterns in bird taxonomic and trait turnover Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 26 Numéro 10 Pages 1190-1200
Mots-Clés Anthropocene; Beta diversity; Beta-diversity; biogeographical legacies; biotic homogenization; climate changes; community; components; dispersal; functional diversity; functional diversity; life-history traits; mammal assemblages; net primary production; regional assemblages; specialization; species richness
Résumé (up) AimTo assess contemporary and historical determinants of taxonomic and ecological trait turnover in birds worldwide. We tested whether taxonomic and trait turnover (1) are structured by regional bioclimatic conditions, (2) increase in relationship with topographic heterogeneity and environmental turnover and change according to current and historical environmental conditions, and (3) decrease with human impact. Major TaxaBirds. LocationGlobal. MethodsWe used computationally efficient algorithms to map the taxonomic and trait turnover of 8,040 terrestrial bird assemblages worldwide, based on a grid with 110km x 110 km resolution overlaid on the extent-of-occurrence maps of 7,964 bird species, and nine ecological traits reflecting six key aspects of bird ecology (diet, habitat use, thermal preference, migration, dispersal and body size). We used quantile regression and model selection to quantify the influence of biomes, environment (temperature, precipitation, altitudinal range, net primary productivity, Quaternary temperature and precipitation change) and human impact (human influence index) on bird turnover. ResultsBird taxonomic and trait turnover were highest in the north African deserts and boreal biomes. In the tropics, taxonomic turnover tended to be higher, but trait turnover was lower than in other biomes. Taxonomic and trait turnover exhibited markedly different or even opposing relationships with climatic and topographic gradients, but at their upper quantiles both types of turnover decreased with increasing human influence. Main conclusionsThe influence of regional, environmental and anthropogenic factors differ between bird taxonomic and trait turnover, consistent with an imprint of niche conservatism, environmental filtering and topographic barriers on bird regional assemblages. Human influence on these patterns is pervasive and demonstrates global biotic homogenization at a macroecological scale.
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ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2212
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Auteur Hattab, T.; Albouy, C.; Lasram, F.B.; Le Loc'h, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Leprieur, F.
Titre A biogeographical regionalization of coastal Mediterranean fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography
Volume 42 Numéro 7 Pages 1336-1348
Mots-Clés Beta diversity; Biogeography; bioregionalization; coastal fishes; compositional turnover; environmental gradient; historical processes; Mediterranean Sea; phylogenetic turnover; species composition
Résumé (up) AimTo delineate the biogeographical regions of the continental shelf of the Mediterranean Sea based on the spatial distributions of coastal marine fishes and their evolutionary relationships, with a view to furthering our capacity to answer basic and applied biogeographical, ecological and evolutionary questions. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe used a dataset summarizing the occurrences of 203 coastal Mediterranean fishes (0.1 degrees resolution grid system) and a molecular phylogenetic tree to quantify both compositional and phylogenetic dissimilarity (or beta diversity) between cells. We then applied multivariate analyses to delineate biogeographical regions and to evaluate how they related to broad-scale environmental gradients. We also assessed the differences between the biogeographical regions identified using phylogenetic beta diversity versus those obtained using compositional beta diversity. ResultsThe bioregionalization schemes based on phylogenetic and compositional beta diversity identified broadly similar regions, each consisting of six distinct pools of coastal fishes. Clear separations between northern and southern regions were observed, as well as a disjunct between inshore and offshore areas. These beta diversity patterns were mainly related to a north-south gradient in sea-surface temperature and bathymetric constraints. Main conclusionsIncorporating phylogenetic information into the measurement of beta diversity did not offer further insights to the bioregionalization scheme based solely on compositional beta diversity. This suggests that evolutionary and historical processes played only a minor role in shaping the contemporary patterns of beta diversity in the Mediterranean coastal fish fauna. However, our results support the view that contemporary environmental conditions play a major role in determining the distribution of these species.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1331
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