bascule de visibilité Search & Display Options

Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print
  Enregistrements Liens
Auteur Toussaint, A.; Beauchard, O.; Oberdorff, T.; Brosse, S.; Villeger, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Worldwide freshwater fish homogenization is driven by a few widespread non-native species Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Invasions  
  Volume 18 Numéro 5 Pages 1295-1304  
  Mots-Clés australia; Beta-diversity; biogeography; biotic homogenization; dispersal; distinctiveness; diversity; Exotic species; faunas; Freshwater fish; iberian peninsula; Introduction; introductions; taxonomic dissimilarity; Translocation  
  Résumé Introduction of non-native species have changed the composition of freshwater fish assemblages throughout the world and hence the dissimilarity between them, either toward homogenization (i.e. decrease in dissimilarity) or differentiation (i.e. increase in dissimilarity). However, there is still no assessment of individual contributions of non-native species to this overall trend at the global scale. Here, we disentangle individual non-native species effect from the global effect of the whole introduced species pool at the biogeographic realm scale and test which determinant can explain the effect of non-native species on changes in assemblage dissimilarity. Our results show that the contribution of introduced species on changes in dissimilarity is highly variable and all directions of changes are observed through the introduction process, i.e. either toward homogenization, differentiation or no change. Overall, only a few widespread species contribute to the worldwide homogenization pattern, whereas most of introduced species slightly contribute to the global change in dissimilarity. The effect of species on change in dissimilarity was influenced by the introduction pressure but also by whether introduced species were translocated (i.e. introduced to other basins within their biogeographic realm) or exotic (i.e. introduced from other biogeographic realms). Homogenization is strongly determined by the species translocated within a realm and only by few widespread exotic species whereas the majority of exotics contribute to a differentiation effect. Nevertheless, under future intensified human pressure, the exotic species spread across realms is predicted to increase and their differentiation effect might turn towards homogenization, and might trigger the global homogenization trend.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1387-3547 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1654  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Pommier, T.; Douzery, E.J.P.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Environment drives high phylogenetic turnover among oceanic bacterial communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 8 Numéro 4 Pages 562-566  
  Mots-Clés Biogeography; connectivity; diversity; dynamics; patterns; phylogenetic turnover  
  Résumé Although environmental filtering has been observed to influence the biodiversity patterns of marine bacterial communities, it was restricted to the regional scale and to the species level, leaving the main drivers unknown at large biogeographic scales and higher taxonomic levels. Bacterial communities with different species compositions may nevertheless share phylogenetic lineages, and phylogenetic turnover (PT) among those communities may be surprisingly low along any biogeographic or environmental gradient. Here, we investigated the relative influence of environmental filtering and geographical distance on the PT between marine bacterial communities living more than 8000 km apart in contrasted abiotic conditions. PT was high between communities and was more structured by local environmental factors than by geographical distance, suggesting the predominance of a lineage filtering process. Strong phenotype-environment mismatches observed in the ocean may surpass high connectivity between marine microbial communities.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 567  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Kadowaki, K.; Barbera, C.G.; Godsoe, W.; Delsuc, F.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Predicting biotic interactions and their variability in a changing environment Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 5 Pages 20151073  
  Mots-Clés Bacteria; climate-change; climate change; distribution models; diversity; extinction risk; global change; microcosm; phylogeny; predictive ecology; range; responses; shifts  
  Résumé Global environmental change is altering the patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Observation and theory suggest that species' distributions and abundances depend on a suite of processes, notably abiotic filtering and biotic interactions, both of which are constrained by species' phylogenetic history. Models predicting species distribution have historically mostly considered abiotic filtering and are only starting to integrate biotic interaction. However, using information on present interactions to forecast the future of biodiversity supposes that biotic interactions will not change when species are confronted with new environments. Using bacterial microcosms, we illustrate how biotic interactions can vary along an environmental gradient and how this variability can depend on the phylogenetic distance between interacting species.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1653  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Tribot, A.-S.; Deter, J.; Claverie, T.; Guillhaumon, F.; Villeger, S.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Species diversity and composition drive the aesthetic value of coral reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 15 Numéro 11 Pages 20190703  
  Mots-Clés aesthetics; biodiversity; conservation; coral reef fish; ecosystem services; functional diversity; human interest; landscape; nature's contribution to people; quality  
  Résumé Cultural and recreational values of biodiversity are considered as important dimensions of nature's contribution to people. Among these values, the aesthetics can be of major importance as the appreciation of beauty is one of the simplest forms of human emotional response. Using an online survey, we disentangled the effects of different facets of biodiversity on aesthetic preferences of coral reef fish assemblages that are among the most emblematic assemblages on Earth. While we found a positive saturating effect of species' richness on human preference, we found a net negative effect of species abundance, no effect of species functional diversity and contrasting effects of species composition depending on species' attractiveness. Our results suggest that the biodiversity-human interest relationship is more complex than has been previously stated. By integrating several scales of organization, our study is a step forward in better evaluating the aesthetic value of biodiversity.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000504840300013 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2713  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Evans, S.M.; McKenna, C.; Simpson, S.D.; Tournois, J.; Genner, M.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Patterns of species range evolution in Indo-Pacific reef assemblages reveal the Coral Triangle as a net source of transoceanic diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 6 Pages 20160090  
  Mots-Clés Bayesian skyline plot; biogeography; climate change; coral reef; fishes global patterns; marine biodiversity; ocean; phylogeography; refugia; species distributions  
  Résumé The Coral Triangle in the Indo-Pacific is a region renowned for exceptional marine biodiversity. The area could have acted as a 'centre of origin' where speciation has been prolific or a 'centre of survival' by providing refuge during major environmental shifts such as sea-level changes. The region could also have acted as a 'centre of accumulation' for species with origins outside of the Coral Triangle, owing to it being at a central position between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Here, we investigated support for these hypotheses using population-level DNA sequence-based reconstructions of the range evolution of 45 species (314 populations) of Indo-Pacific reef-associated organisms. Our results show that populations undergoing the most ancient establishment were significantly more likely to be closer to the centre of the Coral Triangle than to peripheral locations. The data are consistent with the Coral Triangle being a net source of coral-reef biodiversity for the Indo-Pacific region, suggesting that the region has acted primarily as a centre of survival, a centre of origin or both. These results provide evidence of how a key location can influence the large-scale distributions of biodiversity over evolutionary timescales.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1694  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: