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Auteur Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J.; Lasram, F.B.; Mouillot, D.; Cury, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre 'Low-hanging fruit' for conservation of marine vertebrate species at risk in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Frontiers in Microbiology Revue Abrégée (up)  
  Volume 24 Numéro 2 Pages 226-239  
  Mots-Clés Conservation priorities; cumulative threats; IUCN diversities; marine biodiversity; Marine Protected Areas; Mediterranean Sea  
  Résumé AimConservation priorities need to take the feasibility of protection measures into account. In times of economic pressure it is essential to identify the low-hanging fruit' for conservation: areas where human impacts are lower and biological diversity is still high, and thus conservation is more feasible. LocationWe used the Mediterranean large marine ecosystem (LME) as a case study to identify the overlapping areas of low threats and high diversity of vertebrate species at risk. MethodsThis LME is the first in the world to have a complete regional IUCN Red List assessment of the native marine fish. We augmented these data with distributions of marine mammals, marine turtles and seabirds at risk, and we calculated the spatial distributions of species at risk (IUCN densities). Using cumulative threats we identified priority areas for conservation of species at risk' (PACS), where IUCN diversities are high and threats are low. We assessed whether IUCN diversities and PACS were spatially congruent among taxa and we quantified whether PACS corresponded to current and proposed protected areas. ResultsIUCN densities and PACS were not highly correlated spatially among taxa. Continental shelves and deep-sea slopes of the Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean and Tunisian Plateau/Gulf of Sidra are identified as relevant for fish species at risk. The eastern side of the western Mediterranean and the Adriatic Sea are identified as most relevant for endemic fish, and shelf and open sea areas distributed through the LME are most important for marine mammals and turtles at risk, while specific locations of the western Mediterranean Sea and the Aegean and Levantine seas are highlighted for seabirds. Main conclusionsLarge parts of the areas of PACS fell outside current or proposed frameworks to be prioritized for conservation. PACS may be suitable candidates for contributing to the 10% protection target for the Mediterranean Sea by 2020.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1102  
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Auteur Mostajir, B.; Amblard, C.; Buffan-Dubau, E.; De Wit, R.; Lensi, R.; Sime-Ngando, T. url  isbn
openurl 
  Titre Microbial Food Webs in Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecosystems Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée (up)  
  Volume Numéro Pages 485-509  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity; Biogeochemical cycles; Ecological interactions; Microbial Ecology; Microbial food webs; Microbial loop  
  Résumé In microbial food webs, different types of interactions occur between microorganisms themselves and with meio- and macroorganisms. After an historical and general introduction, the biological components of the microbial food webs in the pelagic and benthic marine and lake ecosystems, as well as in the terrestrial ecosystems, are presented. The functioning of the microbial food webs in different ecosystems is illustrated and explained, including the trophic pathways and transfer of matter from microbial food webs toward meio- and macroorganisms of the superior trophic levels, the nutrient recycling in the aquatic environments, and the decomposition of organic matter in soils. Finally, the factors regulating microbial food webs, primarily “top-down” and “bottom-up” controls, are described with a special focus on the role of viruses in the aquatic microbial food webs.  
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  Editeur Springer Netherlands Lieu de Publication Éditeur Bertrand, J.-C.; Caumette, P.; Lebaron, P.; Matheron, R.; Normand, P.; Sime-Ngando, T.  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Environmental Microbiology: Fundamentals and Applications  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-94-017-9117-5 978-94-017-9118-2 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1394  
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Auteur Granger, V.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Bez, N.; Relini, G.; Meynard, C.; GAERTNER, J.-C.; Maiorano, P.; Garcia Ruiz, C.; Follesa, C.; Gristina, M.; Peristeraki, P.; BRIND'AMOUR, A.; Carbonara, P.; Charilaou, C.; Esteban, A.; Jadaud, A.; Joksimovic, A.; Kallianiotis, A.; Kolitari, J.; Manfredi, C.; Massuti, E.; Mifsud, R.; Quetglas, T.; Refes, W.; Sbrana, M.; Vrgoc, N.; SPEDICATO, M.T.; Mérigot, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Large-scale spatio-temporal monitoring highlights hotspots of demersal fish diversity in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Progress in Oceanography Revue Abrégée (up)  
  Volume 130 Numéro Pages 65-74  
  Mots-Clés Functional diversity; Phylogenetic diversity; Rao’s quadratic entropy; Regression tree; Large scale  
  Résumé Increasing human pressures and global environmental change may severely affect the diversity of species assemblages and associated ecosystem services. Despite the recent interest in phylogenetic and functional diversity, our knowledge on large spatio-temporal patterns of demersal fish diversity sampled by trawling remains still incomplete, notably in the Mediterranean Sea, one of the most threatened marine regions of the world. We investigated large spatio-temporal diversity patterns by analysing a dataset of 19,886 hauls from 10 to 800 m depth performed annually during the last two decades by standardized scientific bottom trawl field surveys across the Mediterranean Sea, within the MEDITS program. A multi-component (eight diversity indices) and multi-scale (local assemblages, biogeographic regions to basins) approach indicates that only the two most traditional components (species richness and evenness) were sufficient to reflect patterns in taxonomic, phylogenetic or functional richness and divergence. We also put into question the use of widely computed indices that allow comparing directly taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity within a unique mathematical framework. In addition, demersal fish assemblages sampled by trawl do not follow a continuous decreasing longitudinal/latitudinal diversity gradients (spatial effects explained up to 70.6% of deviance in regression tree and generalized linear models), for any of the indices and spatial scales analysed. Indeed, at both local and regional scales species richness was relatively high in the Iberian region, Malta, the Eastern Ionian and Aegean seas, meanwhile the Adriatic Sea and Cyprus showed a relatively low level. In contrast, evenness as well as taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional divergences did not show regional hotspots. All studied diversity components remained stable over the last two decades. Overall, our results highlight the need to use complementary diversity indices through different spatial scales when developing conservation strategies and defining delimitations for protected areas.  
  Adresse Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Split, Croatia  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Elsevier BV Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Co-auteur au Sud Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 32743 collection 980  
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Auteur Legras, G.; Loiseau, N.; Gaertner, J.-C. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional richness: Overview of indices and underlying concepts Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Acta Oecol.-Int. J. Ecol.  
  Volume 87 Numéro Pages 34-44  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community composition; diversity indexes; ecology; ecosystem processes; fish communities; Functional richness indices; Guidelines; Index properties; intraspecific trait variation; Limitations; phylogenetic diversity; species richness; variability  
  Résumé Functional richness, currently defined as the amount of niche space occupied by the species within a community, is one of the three major components of functional diversity. Different indices have been developed in order to quantify this component. However, the range of indices available for assessing functional richness, often mathematically complex and based on different rationales, can cause confusion for field ecologists and lead to misinterpretation of the results obtained. In this context, we have provided the first study exclusively focused on the comparison of the definitions, advantages and drawbacks of a large set of functional richness indices. The first part of this work is focused on four indices (FDP&G, FRic, TOP and N-hypervolumes indices) that are currently the most commonly used for assessing functional richness. We have completed our study by including recently developed indices that enable us to take into account the intraspecific trait variability (i.e. FRim index and TDP framework), because there is currently a growing scientific consensus regarding the necessity of including this aspect in the assessment of the functional diversity of communities. We demonstrate that although authors have argued that their index describes the functional richness, each of them describes only part of it, and this part may strongly differ from one index to another. Rather than advocating the general use of a single index and/or systematically avoiding others, our study highlights the need for selecting indices in close relation with the context, the available data and the aims of each study. Such a strategy is an essential preliminary step for preventing misunderstanding and artefactual controversies. Along these lines, we propose some guidelines to help users in selecting the most appropriate indices according both to the facet of functional richness on which they wish to focus and to the characteristics of the available data.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2323  
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Auteur Quétel, C.; Marinesque, S.; Ringler, D.; Fillinger, L.; Changeux, T.; Marteau, C.; Troussellier, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Iles Eparses (SW Indian Ocean) as reference ecosystems for environmental research Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Acta Oecologica  
  Volume Numéro Pages 1-8  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity sanctuaries; climate change; Environmental research; Iles Eparses; Indian Ocean; Pristine ecosystems  
  Résumé TAAF ensures since 2007 the management of 5 small tropical islands lying in the southwestern Indian Ocean: the Iles Eparses. These islands share an exceptional natural heritage including many marine and terrestrial endemic species. At a regional scale the Iles Eparses are some of the most pristine ecosystems, largely preserved from anthropogenic impacts due to their geographical isolation and a historically very limited human occupation. In this context, TAAF wished that Iles Eparses become unique natural laboratories for earth scientists and environmental process observation – like climate change impacts – but also sustainable biodiversity sanctuaries for which the scientific community should provide baseline ecological data to inform on appropriate conservation tools. An inter-agency research consortium emerged in 2009 to meet this commitment for the Iles Eparses. This program was intended to set a science framework in accordance with France' objectives for Research and Conservation. It enabled between 2009 and 2014 the implementation of 18 cross-disciplinary research projects ranging from geology to ecology and represented by the variety of the proposed articles in this special issue. Altogether research projects have dramatically increased knowledge on the Iles Eparses' ecosystems and have provided the first overview of their diversity, their functions and their dynamics and its determinants. In particular applied research efforts have supplied a significant amount of ecological evidence that is now available to develop optimal conservation strategy to ensure the Iles Eparses' long-term biodiversity value. These findings point out that the continuation of research activity in the Iles Eparses should be considered a priority.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Îles Éparses (French Scattered Islands, SW Indian Ocean) as reference ecosystems for environmental research. Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection 72 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1571  
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