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Auteur D'Agata, S.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Andrefouet, S.; Bellwood, D.R.; Cinner, J.E.; Cowman, P.F.; Kronen, M.; Pinca, S.; Vigliola, L.
Titre Human-Mediated Loss of Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity in Coral Reef Fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Current Biology
Volume 24 Numéro 5 Pages 555-560
Mots-Clés biodiversity hotspots; climate-change; communities; evolutionary; great-barrier-reef; land-use; parrotfishes; patterns; productivity; resilience
Résumé Beyond the loss of species richness [1-3], human activities may also deplete the breadth of evolutionary history (phylogenetic diversity) and the diversity of roles (functional diversity) carried out by species within communities, two overlooked components of biodiversity. Both are, however, essential to sustain ecosystem functioning and the associated provision of ecosystem services, particularly under fluctuating environmental conditions [1-7]. We quantified the effect of human activities on the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional diversity of fish communities in coral reefs, while teasing apart the influence of biogeography and habitat along a gradient of human pressure across the Pacific Ocean. We detected nonlinear relationships with significant breaking points in the impact of human population density on phylogenetic and functional diversity of parrot-fishes, at 25 and 15 inhabitants/km(2), respectively, while parrot-fish species richness decreased linearly along the same population gradient. Over the whole range, species richness decreased by 11.7%, while phylogenetic and functional diversity dropped by 35.8% and 46.6%, respectively. Our results call for caution when using species richness as a benchmark for measuring the status of ecosystems since it appears to be less responsive to variation in human population densities than its phylogenetic and functional counterparts, potentially imperiling the functioning of coral reef ecosystems.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 645
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Auteur Kermagoret, C.; Claudet, J.; Derolez, V.; Nugues, M.M.; Ouisse, V.; Quillien, N.; Bailly, D.
Titre Dataset on marine ecosystem services supplied by coral reefs, sandy beaches and coastal lagoons in different eutrophication states Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Data Brief
Volume 25 Numéro Pages 104078
Mots-Clés dinoflagellate; Ecosystem services; Eutrophication; Marine biodiversity; Marine ecosystems; patterns
Résumé This data article provides indicators of Ecosystem Service (ES) supply for coral reefs, sandy beaches and coastal lagoons in different ecological states regarding eutrophication. 14 ES are considered: food through fisheries; material; molecules; coastal protection; nutrient regulation; pathogen regulation; climate regulation; support of recreational and leisure activities; contribution to a pleasant landscape; contribution to culture and territorial identity; emblematic biodiversity; habitat; trophic networks; recruitment. For each ecosystem 3 to 4 eutrophication states are described. Indicators of ES supply are filled on the basis of a literature review supplemented with expert-knowledge. A semi-quantification of the indicator value is finally provided. Tendencies and trade-offs between ES are analyzed in How does eutrophication impact bundles of ecosystem services in multiple coastal habitats using state-and-transition models [1]. (c) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2352-3409 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000495104500105 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2680
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Auteur Marsac, F.; Galletti, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Romanov, E.V.; Demarcq, H.; Corbari, L.; Bouchet, P.; Roest, W.R.; Jorry, S.J.; Olu, K.; Loncke, L.; Roberts, M.J.; Ménard, F.
Titre Seamounts, plateaus and governance issues in the southwestern Indian Ocean, with emphasis on fisheries management and marine conservation, using the Walters Shoal as a case study for implementing a protection framework Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume Numéro Pages 104715
Mots-Clés Amended Nairobi Convention; Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction; Benthic biodiversity; Deep-sea fisheries; Deep-sea mining; International Law of the Sea; Marine protected areas; Saya de Malha Bank; South Indian Ocean Fisheries Agreement; Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems
Résumé There is a growing interest in the management of seamounts of the Southwestern Indian Ocean (SWIO) both in waters under national jurisdictions and in the Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ). New scientific knowledge has been gathered through various oceanographic cruises during the past decade, and new agreements are under consideration globally to promote conservation and sustainable use of the biodiversity in the ABNJ, where the deep sea ecosystems associated with seamounts are a growing matter of concern. SWIO seamounts have attracted the interests of fishers since the 1960s, and contracts for mining exploration have been granted recently. Seamounts are known to shelter rich, fragile and poorly resilient ecosystems whose important ecological functions are threatened by various anthropogenic pressures. Whereas many seamounts and shoals are located in national waters, many others fall in the ABNJ, with no current legal status per se. To ensure conservation of their habitats and biodiversity, it is essential that protection measures are instigated under an internationally recognized legal and institutional framework. In this paper, we review the current state of such a framework relevant to seamounts, with emphasis on fisheries and conservation in the SWIO. An emblematic seamount, the Walters Shoal, is selected as a case study to discuss how it could become a fully-protected space in the ABNJ. As a large part of the SWIO is under the mandate of the Nairobi Convention (as a Regional Sea under the auspices of UNEP), guidelines are proposed to encourage dedicated seamount governance within the framework of this Convention.
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Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2689
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Auteur Becheler, R.; Cassone, A.-L.; Noel, P.; Mouchel, O.; Morrison, C.L.; Arnaud-Haond, S.
Titre Low incidence of clonality in cold water corals revealed through the novel use of a standardized protocol adapted to deep sea sampling Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 145 Numéro Pages 120-130
Mots-Clés diversity; dispersal; disturbance; Lophelia pertusa; Madrepora oculata; organisms; population-structure; asexual reproduction; Clonality; Cold-water coral; Fine-grained spatial genetic structure; gorgonian coral; lophelia-pertusa; pertusa linnaeus 1758; spatial genetic-structure; Standardized sampling
Résumé Sampling in the deep sea is a technical challenge, which has hindered the acquisition of robust datasets that are necessary to determine the fine-grained biological patterns and processes that may shape genetic diversity. Estimates of the extent of clonality in deep-sea species, despite the importance of clonality in shaping the local dynamics and evolutionary trajectories, have been largely obscured by such limitations. Cold-water coral reefs along European margins are formed mainly by two reef-building species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Here we present a fine-grained analysis of the genotypic and genetic composition of reefs occurring in the Bay of Biscay, based on an innovative deep-sea sampling protocol. This strategy was designed to be standardized, random, and allowed the georeferencing of all sampled colonies. Clonal lineages discriminated through their Multi-Locus Genotypes (MLG) at 6-7 microsatellite markers could thus be mapped to assess the level of clonality and the spatial spread of clonal lineages. High values of clonal richness were observed for both species across all sites suggesting a limited occurrence of clonality, which likely originated through fragmentation. Additionally, spatial autocorrelation analysis underlined the possible occurrence of fine-grained genetic structure in several populations of both L. pertusa and M. oculata. The two cold-water coral species examined had contrasting patterns of connectivity among canyons, with among-canyon genetic structuring detected in M. oculata, whereas L. pertusa was panmictic at the canyon scale. This study exemplifies that a standardized, random and georeferenced sampling strategy, while challenging, can be applied in the deep sea, and associated benefits outlined here include improved estimates of fine grained patterns of clonality and dispersal that are comparable across sites and among species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2257
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Auteur Potier, M.; Bach, P.; Ménard, F.; Marsac, F.
Titre Influence of mesoscale features on micronekton and large pelagic fish communities in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 184-199
Mots-Clés Biodiversity; Mid-water trawl; Mozambique Channel; Oceanic eddies; Pelagic longline; Stomach contents
Résumé We investigated the diversity and distribution of two communities, micronekton organisms and large predatory fishes, sampled in mesoscale features of the Mozambique Channel from 2003 to 2009, by combining mid-water trawls, stomach contents of fish predators and instrumented longline fishing surveys. The highest species richness for assemblages was found in divergences and fronts rather than in the core of eddies. Despite an unbalanced scheme, diversity indices did not differ significantly between cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies, divergences and fronts. We found that eddies and associated physical cues did not substantially affect the distribution of micronektonic species which are mainly driven by the diel vertical migration pattern. Top predators exhibited a more complex response. Swordfish (Xiphias gladius) associated better with mesoscale features than tunas, with a clear preference for divergences which is consistent with the diel vertical migrations and occurrence of its main prey, the flying squids Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis (Ommastrephidae). On the other hand, the probability of presence of yellowfin tuna was not tied to any specific eddy structure. However, the highest values of positive yellowfin CPUEs were associated with low horizontal gradients of sea-level anomalies. We also showed a non-linear response of positive yellowfin CPUEs with respect to the depth of the minimal oxygen content. The larger the distance between the hooks and the minimal oxygen layer, towards the surface or at greater depths, the higher the CPUE, highlighting that yellowfin congregated in well-oxygenated waters. Micronekton sampled by mid-water trawls and stomach contents exhibited different species composition. The highly mobile organisms were not caught by trawling whereas they remain accessible to predators. The combination of stomach contents and mid-water trawls undoubtedly improved our understanding of the micronekton assemblage distribution. Our results provide some evidence that mesoscale features in the Mozambique Channel do not strongly affect the distribution of the mid-trophic level organisms such as micronekton and most of the large predatory fishes, and hypotheses are proposed to support this result.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 369
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