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Auteur Descombes, P.; Gaboriau, T.; Albouy, C.; Heine, C.; Leprieur, F.; Pellissier, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Linking species diversification to palaeo-environmental changes: A process-based modelling approach Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 27 Numéro 2 Pages 233-244  
  Mots-Clés patterns; biodiversity; latitudinal gradient; richness; diversification; climate-change; marine ecosystems; fish diversity; genetic diversity; biodiversity dynamics; extinction rates; fossils; global simulation models; mangrove; oceanic dispersal; palaeo-environments; plate-tectonics  
  Résumé Aim: The importance of quantifying the contribution of historical processes in shaping current biodiversity patterns is now recognized, but quantitative approaches that explicitly link speciation, extinction and dispersal processes to palaeo-environmental changes are currently lacking. Here, we propose a spatial diversification model of lineages through time (SPLIT) based on the reconstruction of palaeo-environments. We illustrate our approach using mangroves as a case study and evaluate whether habitat changes caused by plate tectonics explain the current biodiversity patterns of this group. Innovations: The SPLIT model allows one to simulate the evolutionary dynamics of species ranges by spatially linking speciation, extinction and dispersal processes to habitat changes over geological time periods. The SPLIT model provides a mechanistic expectation of speciation and extinction assuming that species are ecologically identical and not interacting. The likelihood of speciation and extinction is equivalent across species and depends on two dispersal parameters interacting with habitat dynamics (d a maximum dispersal distance and ds a distance threshold beyond which gene flow is absent). Beyond classical correlative approaches, this model tracks biodiversity dynamics under palaeo-environmental changes and provides multiple expectations (i.e., alpha-, beta-diversity, phylogenies) that can be compared to empirical patterns. Main conclusions: The SPLIT model allows a better understanding of the origin of biodiversity by explicitly accounting for habitat changes over geological times. The simulations applied to the mangrove case study reproduced the observed longitudinal gradient in species richness, the empirical pattern of beta-diversity and also provided inference on diversification rates. Future developments may include niche evolution and species interactions to evaluate the importance of non-neutral mechanisms. The method is fully implemented in the InsideDNA platform for bioinformatics analyses, and all modelling results can be accessed via interactive web links.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2284  
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Auteur Descombes, P.; Leprieur, F.; Albouy, C.; Heine, C.; Pellissier, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Spatial imprints of plate tectonics on extant richness of terrestrial vertebrates Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 44 Numéro 5 Pages 1185-1197  
  Mots-Clés american biotic interchange; amphibian; andean uplift; bird; climate-change; continental drift; diversification rates; diversity; global patterns; indo-pacific; large-scale patterns; madagascar; mammal; plate tectonics; sea-level; Southeast Asia; species richness; Wallace line; wallaces line  
  Résumé AimIn interaction with past climate changes, it is likely that plate tectonics contributed to the shaping of current global species diversity, but so far this has not been statistically quantified at the global level. Here, we tested whether plate tectonics since the breakup of Gondwana left an imprint on current patterns of species richness of amphibians, birds and mammals. LocationGlobal. MethodsWe reconstructed the absolute positions of continental plates since the Early Cretaceous and used this information to derive variables of latitudinal shifts and potential exchanges among landmasses that could have modulated species richness. Using a multi-model inference approach combining both contemporary and historical variables, we quantified the relative importance of variables related to plate tectonics in explaining the spatial variation of the richness of amphibians, birds and mammals. Next, we employed a moving window approach to test whether plate tectonics left a more marked imprint in specific regions. ResultsPlatetectonics left an imprint on current patterns of vertebrate species richness in geologically singular regions, especially in the Indo-Australian Archipelago and the region comprising eastern Africa and Madagascar. For birds and mammals, but not amphibians, we found a marked contrast in species richness across Australia and Southeast Asia and eastern Africa and Madagascar associated with plate tectonics. Moreover, the relationship between species richness and plate tectonics varied across taxonomic orders for birds and mammals. Main conclusionsWhile no general imprint of plate tectonics was detected at the global scale, our regional analysis highlighted a substantial role of geodynamics in shaping current patterns of vertebrate species richness in Southeast Asia and Madagascar. Future studies should integrate the full range of processes associated with plate tectonics, including orogeny, not considered here.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2129  
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Auteur Donati, G.F.A.; Parravicini, V.; Leprieur, F.; Hagen, O.; Gaboriau, T.; Heine, C.; Kulbicki, M.; Rolland, J.; Salamin, N.; Albouy, C.; Pellissier, L. doi  openurl
  Titre A process-based model supports an association between dispersal and the prevalence of species traits in tropical reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; body-size; dispersal; diversification; diversity; extinction rates; genetic-structure; geographic range size; global patterns; latitudinal gradient; mechanistic models; propagule dispersal; reef fish; speciation; traits  
  Résumé Habitat dynamics interacting with species dispersal abilities could generate gradients in species diversity and prevalence of species traits when the latter are associated with species dispersal potential. Using a process-based model of diversification constrained by a dispersal parameter, we simulated the interplay between reef habitat dynamics during the past 140 million years and dispersal, shaping lineage diversification history and assemblage composition globally. The emerging patterns from the simulations were compared to current prevalence of species traits related to dispersal for 6315 tropical reef fish species. We found a significant spatial congruence between the prevalence of simulated low dispersal values and areas with a large proportion of species characterized by small adult body size, narrow home range mobility behaviour, pelagic larval duration shorter than 21 days and diurnal activity. Species characterized by such traits were found predominantly in the Indo-Australian Archipelago and the Caribbean Sea. Furthermore, the frequency distribution of the dispersal parameter was found to match empirical distributions for body size, PLD and home range mobility behaviour. Also, the dispersal parameter in the simulations was associated to diversification rates and resulted in trait frequency matching empirical distributions. Overall, our findings suggest that past habitat dynamics, in conjunction with dispersal processes, influenced diversification in tropical reef fishes, which may explain the present-day geography of species traits.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000487946300001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2647  
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Auteur Gaboriau, T.; Albouy, C.; Descombes, P.; Mouillot, D.; Pellissier, L.; Leprieur, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological constraints coupled with deep-time habitat dynamics predict the latitudinal diversity gradient in reef fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 286 Numéro 1911 Pages 20191506  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate; diversification; environmental-changes; global patterns; latitudinal diversity gradient; mechanistic model; niche conservatism; palaeohabitat; plate-tectonics; rates; reef fish; relative roles; species richness  
  Résumé We develop a spatially explicit model of diversification based on palaeohabitat to explore the predictions of four major hypotheses potentially explaining the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), namely, the 'time-area', 'tropical niche conservatism', 'ecological limits' and 'evolutionary speed' livpotheses. We compare simulation outputs to observed diversity gradients in the global reef fish fauna. Our simulations show that these hypotheses are nonmutually exclusive and that their relative influence depends on the time scale considered. Simulations suggest that reef habitat dynamics produced the LDG during deep geological time, while ecological constraints shaped the modern LDG, with a strong influence of the reduction in the latitudinal extent of tropical reefs during the Neogene. Overall, this study illustrates how mechanistic models in ecology and evolution can provide a temporal and spatial understanding of the role of speciation, extinction and dispersal in generating biodiversity patterns.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000486417800008 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2650  
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Auteur Meynard, C.N.; Mouillot, D.; Mouquet, N.; Douzery, E.J.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre A Phylogenetic Perspective on the Evolution of Mediterranean Teleost Fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS One  
  Volume 7 Numéro 5 Pages  
  Mots-Clés cytochrome-b; divergence time; diversification; dna sequences; missing data; mitochondrial genome sequences; molecular phylogeny; nuclear; ray-finned fishes; tetraodontiform fishes  
  Résumé The Mediterranean Sea is a highly diverse, highly studied, and highly impacted biogeographic region, yet no phylogenetic reconstruction of fish diversity in this area has been published to date. Here, we infer the timing and geographic origins of Mediterranean teleost species diversity using nucleotide sequences collected from GenBank. We assembled a DNA supermatrix composed of four mitochondrial genes (12S ribosomal DNA, 16S ribosomal DNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and cytochrome b) and two nuclear genes (rhodopsin and recombination activating gene I), including 62% of Mediterranean teleost species plus 9 outgroups. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic and dating analyses were calibrated using 20 fossil constraints. An additional 124 species were grafted onto the chronogram according to their taxonomic affinity, checking for the effects of taxonomic coverage in subsequent diversification analyses. We then interpreted the time-line of teleost diversification in light of Mediterranean historical biogeography, distinguishing non-endemic natives, endemics and exotic species. Results show that the major Mediterranean orders are of Cretaceous origin, specifically similar to 100-80 Mya, and most Perciformes families originated 80-50 Mya. Two important clade origin events were detected. The first at 100-80 Mya, affected native and exotic species, and reflects a global diversification period at a time when the Mediterranean Sea did not yet exist. The second occurred during the last 50 Mya, and is noticeable among endemic and native species, but not among exotic species. This period corresponds to isolation of the Mediterranean from Indo-Pacific waters before the Messinian salinity crisis. The Mediterranean fish fauna illustrates well the assembly of regional faunas through origination and immigration, where dispersal and isolation have shaped the emergence of a biodiversity hotspot.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 408  
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