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Auteur (up) Abgrall, C.; Chauvat, M.; Langlois, E.; Hedde, M.; Mouillot, D.; Salmon, S.; Winck, B.; Forey, E.
Titre Shifts and linkages of functional diversity between above- and below-ground compartments along a flooding gradient Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Funct. Ecol.
Volume 31 Numéro 2 Pages 350-360
Mots-Clés biodiversity; community assembly; community ecology; disturbance; divergence; environmental gradient; feeding guilds; functional traits; microarthropod communities; null models; patterns; plant; plant communities; soil collembola; soil-plant interactions; species traits; trait convergence and trait divergence
Résumé 1. Trait-based approaches have the potential to reveal general and predictive relationships between organisms and ecosystem functioning. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional structure of communities are still unclear. Within terrestrial ecosystems, several studies have shown that many ecological processes are controlled by the interacting above-and belowground compartments. However, few studies have used traits to reveal the functional relationships between plants and soil fauna. Mostly, research combining plants and soil fauna solely used the traits of one assemblage in predictive studies. 2. Above-ground (plants) and below-ground (Collembola) compartments were sampled over a flooding gradient in northern France along the Seine River. First, we measured the effect of flooding on functional and taxonomic assembly within both communities. We then considered the linkages between plant and Collembolan species richness, community traits and assessed whether traits of both compartments converged at high flooding intensity (abiotic filtering) and diverged when this constraint is released (biotic filtering). 3. Species richness of both taxa followed the same bell-shaped pattern along the gradient, while a similar significant pattern of functional richness was only observed for plants. Further analyses revealed a progressive shift from trait convergence to divergence for plants, but not for Collembola, as constraints intensity decreased. Instead, our results highlighted that Collembola traits were mainly linked to the variations in plant traits. This leads, within Collembola assemblages, to convergence of a subset of perception and habitat-related traits for which the relationship with plant traits was assessed. 4. Synthesis. Using a trait-based approach, our study highlighted that functional relationships occur between above-and below-ground compartments. We underlined that functional composition of plant communities plays a key role in structuring Collembola assemblages in addition to the role of abiotic variables. Our study clearly shows that functional diversity provides a new approach to link the above-and below-ground compartments and might, therefore, be further considered when studying ecological processes at the interface between both compartments.
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ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2091
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Auteur (up) Almoussawi, A.; Lenoir, J.; Jamoneau, A.; Hattab, T.; Wasof, S.; Gallet-Moron, E.; Garzon-Lopez, C.X.; Spicher, F.; Kobaissi, A.; Decocq, G.
Titre Forest fragmentation shapes the alpha-gamma relationship in plant diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Veg. Sci.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés agricultural landscapes; alpha diversity; anthropogenic disturbances; assemblages; community assembly; community patterns; competition; connectivity; dispersal limitations; gamma diversity; habitat conservation strategies; habitat fragmentation; local-regional richness relationship; metacommunity dynamics; regional species richness; relative importance; saturation; specialists; succession
Résumé Questions Forest fragmentation affects biodiversity locally (alpha diversity) and beyond – at relatively larger scales (gamma diversity) – by increasing dispersal and recruitment limitations. Yet, does an increase in fragmentation affect the relationship between alpha and gamma diversity and what can we learn from it? Location Northern France. Methods We surveyed 116 forest patches across three fragmentation levels: none (continuous forest); intermediate (forest patches connected by hedgerows); and high (isolated forest patches). Plant species richness of both forest specialists and generalists was surveyed at five nested spatial resolutions across each forest patch: 1 m(2); 10 m(2); 100 m(2); 1,000 m(2); and total forest patch area. First, we ran log-ratio models to quantify the alpha-gamma relationship. We did that separately for all possible combinations of fragmentation level (none vs intermediate vs high) x spatial scale (e.g., alpha-1 m(2) vs gamma-10 m(2)) x species type (e.g., alpha-specialists vs gamma-specialists). We then used linear mixed-effects models to analyze the effect of fragmentation level, spatial scale, species type and all two-way interaction terms on the slope coefficient extracted from all log-ratio models. Results We found an interaction effect between fragmentation level and species type, such that forest specialists shifted from a linear (i.e., proportional sampling) to a curvilinear plateau (i.e., community saturation) relationship at low and high fragmentation, respectively, while generalists shifted from a curvilinear to a linear pattern. Conclusions The impact of forest fragmentation on the alpha-gamma relationship supports generalist species persistence over forest specialists, with contrasting mechanisms for these two guilds. As fragmentation increases, forest specialists shift from proportional sampling towards community saturation, thus reducing alpha diversity likely due to dispersal limitation. Contrariwise, generalists shift from community saturation towards proportional sampling, thus increasing alpha diversity likely due to an increase in the edge:core ratio. To ensure long-term conservation of forest specialists, one single large forest patch should be preferred over several small ones.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1100-9233 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000493723100001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2676
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Auteur (up) Batsleer, J.; Marchal, P.; Vaz, S.; Vermard, V.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Poos, J.J.
Titre Exploring habitat credits to manage the benthic impact in a mixed fishery Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Volume 586 Numéro Pages 167-179
Mots-Clés growth; sea; reserves; marine protected areas; juvenile; Plaice; Eastern English Channel; Fleet dynamics; vms data; fishing disturbance; central english-channel; Cod; costs; Dynamic state variable modelling; georges bank; Mixed fisheries; tac; Total allowable catch
Résumé The performance of a combined catch quota and habitat credit system was explored to manage the sustainable exploitation of a mix of demersal fish species and reduce the benthic impacts of bottom trawl fisheries using a dynamic state variable model approach. The model was parameterised for the Eastern English Channel demersal mixed fishery using otter trawls or dredges. Target species differed in their association with habitat types. Restricting catch quota for plaice and cod had a limited effect on benthic impact, except when reduced to very low values, forcing the vessels to stay in port. Quota management had a minimal influence on fishing behaviour and hence resulted in a minimal reduction of benthic impact. Habitat credits may reduce the benthic impacts of the trawl fisheries at a minimal loss of landings and revenue, as vessels are still able to reallocate their effort to less vulnerable fishing grounds, while allowing the fishery to catch their catch quota and maintain their revenue. Only if they are reduced to extremely low levels can habitat credits potentially constrain fishing activities to levels that prevent the fisheries from using up the catch quota for the target species.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2283
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Auteur (up) Becheler, R.; Cassone, A.-L.; Noel, P.; Mouchel, O.; Morrison, C.L.; Arnaud-Haond, S.
Titre Low incidence of clonality in cold water corals revealed through the novel use of a standardized protocol adapted to deep sea sampling Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 145 Numéro Pages 120-130
Mots-Clés diversity; dispersal; disturbance; Lophelia pertusa; Madrepora oculata; organisms; population-structure; asexual reproduction; Clonality; Cold-water coral; Fine-grained spatial genetic structure; gorgonian coral; lophelia-pertusa; pertusa linnaeus 1758; spatial genetic-structure; Standardized sampling
Résumé Sampling in the deep sea is a technical challenge, which has hindered the acquisition of robust datasets that are necessary to determine the fine-grained biological patterns and processes that may shape genetic diversity. Estimates of the extent of clonality in deep-sea species, despite the importance of clonality in shaping the local dynamics and evolutionary trajectories, have been largely obscured by such limitations. Cold-water coral reefs along European margins are formed mainly by two reef-building species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Here we present a fine-grained analysis of the genotypic and genetic composition of reefs occurring in the Bay of Biscay, based on an innovative deep-sea sampling protocol. This strategy was designed to be standardized, random, and allowed the georeferencing of all sampled colonies. Clonal lineages discriminated through their Multi-Locus Genotypes (MLG) at 6-7 microsatellite markers could thus be mapped to assess the level of clonality and the spatial spread of clonal lineages. High values of clonal richness were observed for both species across all sites suggesting a limited occurrence of clonality, which likely originated through fragmentation. Additionally, spatial autocorrelation analysis underlined the possible occurrence of fine-grained genetic structure in several populations of both L. pertusa and M. oculata. The two cold-water coral species examined had contrasting patterns of connectivity among canyons, with among-canyon genetic structuring detected in M. oculata, whereas L. pertusa was panmictic at the canyon scale. This study exemplifies that a standardized, random and georeferenced sampling strategy, while challenging, can be applied in the deep sea, and associated benefits outlined here include improved estimates of fine grained patterns of clonality and dispersal that are comparable across sites and among species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2257
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Auteur (up) Colin, N.; Villeger, S.; Wilkes, M.; de Sostoa, A.; Maceda-Veiga, A.
Titre Functional diversity measures revealed impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation on species-poor freshwater fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.
Volume 625 Numéro Pages 861-871
Mots-Clés biodiversity; ecosystems; community; life-history traits; Non-native species; 4th-corner problem; Functional diversity; Fish assemblages; Biomonitoring; ecological quality; flow regime; Human disturbance; mediterranean rivers; Mediterranean rivers; stream; traits-environment relationships
Résumé Trail-based ecology has been developed for decades lo infer ecosystem responses to stressors based on the functional structure of communities, yet its value in species-poor systems is largely unknown. Here, we used an extensive clataset in a Spanish region highly prone to non-native fish invasions (15 catchments, N 389 sites) to assess for the first time how species-poor communities respond to large-scale environmental gradients using a taxonomic and functional trait-based approach in riverine fish. We examined total species richness and three functional trait-based indices available when many sites have <= 3 species (specialization, FSpe; onginaliy, FOri and entropy, FEnt). We assessed the responses of these taxonomic and functional indices along gradients of altitude, water pollution, physical habitat degradation and non-native fish biomass. Whilst species richness was relatively sensitive to spatial effects, functional diversity indices were responsive across natural and anthropogenic gradients. All four diversity measures declined with altitude but this decline was modulated by physical habitat degradation (richness, FSpe and FEnt) and the non-native total fish biomass ratio (FSpe and FOri) in ways that varied between indices. Furthermore, FSpe and FOri were significantly correlated with Total Nitrogen. Non-native fish were a major component of the taxonomic and functional structure of fish communities, raising concerns about potential misdiagnosis between invaded and environmentally-degraded river reaches. Such misdiagnosis was evident in a regional fish index widely used in official monitoring programs. We recommend the application of FSpe and FOri to extensive clatasets from monitoring programs in order to generate valuable cross-system information about the impacts of non-native species and habitat degradation, even in species-poor systems. Scoring non-native species apart from habitat degradation in the indices used to determine ecosystem health is essential to develop better management strategies. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2309
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