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Auteur Paiola, M.; Knigge, T.; Duflot, A.; Pinto, P.I.S.; Farcy, E.; Monsinjon, T.
Titre Oestrogen, an evolutionary conserved regulator of T cell differentiation and immune tolerance in jawed vertebrates? Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Dev. Comp. Immunol.
Volume 84 Numéro Pages 48-61
Mots-Clés bass dicentrarchus-labrax; danio-rerio; dendritic cells; estradiol; european sea-bass; Gamma-delta T cell; gene-expression; Head-kidney; receptor modulators; Regulatory T cell; reproductive-cycle; Spleen; Teleost; thymic epithelial-cells; Thymus; zebrafish
Résumé In teleosts, as in mammals, the immune system is tightly regulated by sexual steroid hormones, such as oestrogens. We investigated the effects of 17 beta-oestradiol on the expression of several genes related to T cell development and resulting T cell subpopulations in sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, for a primary lymphoid organ, the thymus, and two secondary lymphoid organs, the head-kidney and the spleen. In parallel, the oxidative burst capacity was assessed in leucocytes of the secondary lymphoid organs. Apoptosis- and proliferation-related genes, indicative of B and T cell clonal selection and lymphoid progenitor activity, were not affected by elevated oestrogen-levels. Sex-related oestrogen-responsiveness in T cell and antigen-presenting cell markers was observed, the expression of which was differentially induced by oestrogen-exposure in the three lymphoid organs. Remarkably, in the spleen, oestrogen increased regulatory T cell-related gene expression was associated with a decrease in oxidative burst capacity. To the best of our knowledge, this study indicates for the first time that physiological levels of oestrogen are likely to promote immune tolerance by modulating thymic function (i.e., T cell development and output) and peripheral T cells in teleosts, similar to previously reported oestrogenic effects in mammals. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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ISSN 0145-305x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2340
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Auteur Killen, S.S.; Marras, S.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre Fast growers sprint slower: effects of food deprivation and re-feeding on sprint swimming performance in individual juvenile European sea bass Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology
Volume 217 Numéro 6 Pages 859-865
Mots-Clés Compensatory growth; Ecophysiology; Food deprivation; Foraging; Locomotion; atlantic; catch-up growth; cod; dicentrarchus-labrax; ecological performance; gadus-morhua; long-term starvation; metabolic responses; salmon; teleost fish; trade-off; trade-offs; trout oncorhynchus-mykiss
Résumé While many ectothermic species can withstand prolonged fasting without mortality, food deprivation may have sublethal effects of ecological importance, including reductions in locomotor ability. Little is known about how such changes in performance in individual animals are related to either mass loss during food deprivation or growth rate during re-feeding. This study followed changes in the maximum sprint swimming performance of individual European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, throughout 45 days of food deprivation and 30 days of re-feeding. Maximum sprint speed did not show a significant decline until 45 days of food deprivation. Among individuals, the reduction in sprinting speed at this time was not related to mass loss. After 30 days of re-feeding, mean sprinting speed had recovered to match that of control fish. Among individuals, however, maximum sprinting speed was negatively correlated with growth rate after the resumption of feeding. This suggests that the rapid compensatory growth that occurs during re-feeding after a prolonged fast carries a physiological cost in terms of reduced sprinting capacity, the extent of which shows continuous variation among individuals in relation to growth rate. The long-term repeatability of maximum sprint speed was low when fish were fasted or fed a maintenance ration, but was high among control fish fed to satiation. Fish that had been previously food deprived continued to show low repeatability in sprinting ability even after the initiation of ad libitum feeding, probably stemming from variation in compensatory growth among individuals and its associated negative effects on sprinting ability. Together, these results suggest that food limitation can disrupt hierarchies of maximum sprint performance within populations. In the wild, the cumulative effects on locomotor capacity of fasting and re-feeding could lead to variable survival among individuals with different growth trajectories following a period of food deprivation.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 601
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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S.
Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857
Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics
Résumé AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).
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ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627
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Auteur Lefevre, S.; Domenici, P.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre Swimming in air-breathing fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Journal of Fish Biology
Volume 84 Numéro 3 Pages 661-681
Mots-Clés acid-base; aerobic metabolism; amia-calva; bimodal respiration; dicentrarchus-labrax; european sea-bass; exercise; exhaustive exercise; gar lepisosteus-platyrhincus; megalops-cyprinoides; pacific; partitioning; rainbow-trout; recovery; respiratory; tarpon; trout oncorhynchus-mykiss
Résumé Fishes with bimodal respiration differ in the extent of their reliance on air breathing to support aerobic metabolism, which is reflected in their lifestyles and ecologies. Many freshwater species undertake seasonal and reproductive migrations that presumably involve sustained aerobic exercise. In the six species studied to date, aerobic exercise in swim flumes stimulated air-breathing behaviour, and there is evidence that surfacing frequency and oxygen uptake from air show an exponential increase with increasing swimming speed. In some species, this was associated with an increase in the proportion of aerobic metabolism met by aerial respiration, while in others the proportion remained relatively constant. The ecological significance of anaerobic swimming activities, such as sprinting and fast-start manoeuvres during predator-prey interactions, has been little studied in air-breathing fishes. Some species practise air breathing during recovery itself, while others prefer to increase aquatic respiration, possibly to promote branchial ion exchange to restore acid-base balance, and to remain quiescent and avoid being visible to predators. Overall, the diversity of air-breathing fishes is reflected in their swimming physiology as well, and further research is needed to increase the understanding of the differences and the mechanisms through which air breathing is controlled and used during exercise.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 877
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Auteur McKenzie, D.J.; Steffensen, J.F.; Taylor, E.W.; Abe, A.S.
Titre The contribution of air breathing to aerobic scope and exercise performance in the banded knifefish Gymnotus carapo L Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée J. Exp. Biol.
Volume 215 Numéro 8 Pages 1323-1330
Mots-Clés Hypoxia; amia-calva; aquatic hypoxia; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; cardiac-performance; critical swimming speed; european sea-bass; megalops-cyprinoides; metabolic rate; oxygen uptake; oxygen-tensions; rainbow-trout; respiratory mode; respirometry; swimming performance
Résumé The contribution of air breathing to aerobic metabolic scope and exercise performance was investigated in a teleost with bimodal respiration, the banded knifefish, submitted to a critical swimming speed (U-crit) protocol at 30 degrees C. Seven individuals (mean +/- s.e.m. mass 89 +/- 7. g, total length 230 +/- 4. mm) achieved a U-crit of 2.1 +/- 1. body. lengths. (BL). s(-1) and an active metabolic rate (AMR) of 350 +/- 21. mg. kg(-1). h(-1), with 38 +/- 6% derived from air breathing. All of the knifefish exhibited a significant increase in air-breathing frequency (f(AB)) with swimming speed. If denied access to air in normoxia, these individuals achieved a U-crit of 2.0 +/- 0.2. BL. s(-1) and an AMR of 368 +/- 24. mg. kg(-1). h(-1) by gill ventilation alone. In normoxia, therefore, the contribution of air breathing to scope and exercise was entirely facultative. In aquatic hypoxia (P-O2=4. kPa) with access to normoxic air, the knifefish achieved a U-crit of 2.0 +/- 0.1. BL. s(-1) and an AMR of 338 +/- 29. mg. kg(-1). h(-1), similar to aquatic normoxia, but with 55 +/- 5% of AMR derived from air breathing. Indeed, f(AB) was higher than in normoxia at all swimming speeds, with a profound exponential increase during exercise. If the knifefish were denied access to air in hypoxia, U-crit declined to 1.2 +/- 0.1. BL. s(-1) and AMR declined to 199 +/- 29. mg. kg(-1). h(-1). Therefore, air breathing allowed the knifefish to avoid limitations to aerobic scope and exercise performance in aquatic hypoxia.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 904
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