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Auteur Barneche, D.R.; Rezende, E.L.; Parravicini, V.; Maire, Eva; Edgar, G.J.; Stuart-Smith, R.D.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Ferreira, C.E.L.; Friedlander, A.M.; Green, A.L.; Luiz, O.J.; Rodriguez-Zaragoza, F.A.; Vigliola, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Floeter, S.R. doi  openurl
  Titre Body size, reef area and temperature predict global reef-fish species richness across spatial scales Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 28 Numéro 3 Pages 315-327  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; diversity; patterns; coral-reefs; spatial scale; community assembly; biogeography; extrapolation; local diversity; neutral theory; range size; rarefaction; regional diversity; species energy  
  Résumé Aim To investigate biotic and abiotic correlates of reef-fish species richness across multiple spatial scales. Location Tropical reefs around the globe, including 485 sites in 109 sub-provinces spread across 14 biogeographic provinces. Time period Present. Major taxa studied 2,523 species of reef fish. Methods We compiled a database encompassing 13,050 visual transects. We used hierarchical linear Bayesian models to investigate whether fish body size, reef area, isolation, temperature, and anthropogenic impacts correlate with reef-fish species richness at each spatial scale (i.e., sites, sub-provinces, provinces). Richness was estimated using coverage-based rarefaction. We also tested whether species packing (i.e., transect-level species richness/m(2)) is correlated with province-level richness. Results Body size had the strongest effect on species richness across all three spatial scales. Reef area and temperature were both positively correlated with richness at all spatial scales. At the site scale only, richness decreased with reef isolation. Species richness was not correlated with proxies of human impacts. Species packing was correlated with species richness at the province level following a sub-linear power function. Province-level differences in species richness were also mirrored by patterns of body size distribution at the site scale. Species-rich provinces exhibited heterogeneous assemblages of small-bodied species with small range sizes, whereas species-poor provinces encompassed homogeneous assemblages composed by larger species with greater dispersal capacity. Main conclusions Our findings suggest that body size distribution, reef area and temperature are major predictors of species richness and accumulation across scales, consistent with recent theories linking home range to species-area relationships as well as metabolic effects on speciation rates. Based on our results, we hypothesize that in less diverse areas, species are larger and likely more dispersive, leading to larger range sizes and less turnover between sites. Our results indicate that changes in province-level (i.e., regional) richness should leave a tractable fingerprint in local assemblages, and that detailed studies on local-scale assemblage composition may be informative of responses occurring at larger scales.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2522  
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Auteur Lagabrielle, E.; Allibert, A.; Kiszka, J.J.; Loiseau, N.; Kilfoil, J.P.; Lemahieu, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the increasing occurrence of shark-human interactions around a fast-developing Indian Ocean island Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 3676  
  Mots-Clés coral-reefs; south-africa; florida; western-australia; carcharhinus-leucas; movement patterns; attack; bull shark; la reunion; reunion-island  
  Résumé Understanding the environmental drivers of interactions between predators and humans is critical for public safety and management purposes. In the marine environment, this issue is exemplified by shark-human interactions. The annual shark bite incidence rate (SBIR) in La Reunion (Indian Ocean) is among the highest in the world (up to 1 event per 24,000 hours of surfing) and has experienced a 23-fold increase over the 2005-2016 period. Since 1988, 86% of shark bite events on ocean-users involved surfers off the leeward coast, where 96% of surfing activities took place. We modeled the SBIR as a function of environmental variables, including benthic substrate, sea temperature and period of day. The SBIR peaked in winter, during the afternoon and dramatically increased on coral substrate since the mid-2000s. Seasonal patterns of increasing SBIR followed similar fluctuations of large coastal shark occurrences (particularly the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas), consistent with the hypothesis that higher shark presence may result in an increasing likelihood of shark bite events. Potential contributing factors and adaptation of ocean-users to the increasing shark bite hazard are discussed. This interdisciplinary research contributes to a better understanding of shark-human interactions. The modeling method is relevant for wildlife hazard management in general.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2314  
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Auteur Leprieur, F.; Colosio, S.; Descombes, P.; Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Cowman, P.F.; Bellwood, D.R.; Mouillot, D.; Pellissier, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Historical and contemporary determinants of global phylogenetic structure in tropical reef fish faunas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 39 Numéro 9 Pages 825-835  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity hotspots; climate-change; community ecology; coral-reefs; damselfishes teleostei; evolutionary origins; genetic-structure; indo-pacific; latitudinal diversity gradient; species richness  
  Résumé Identifying the main determinants of tropical marine biodiversity is essential for devising appropriate conservation measures mitigating the ongoing degradation of coral reef habitats. Based on a gridded distribution database and phylogenetic information, we compared the phylogenetic structure of assemblages for three tropical reef fish families (Labridae: wrasses, Pomacentridae: damselfishes and Chaetodontidae: butterflyfishes) using the net relatedness (NRI) and nearest taxon (NTI) indices. We then related these indices to contemporary and historical environmental conditions of coral reefs using spatial regression analyses. Higher levels of phylogenetic clustering were found for fish assemblages in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA), and more particularly when considering the NTI index. The phylogenetic structure of the Pomacentridae, and to a lower extent of the Chaeotodontidae and Labridae, was primarily associated with the location of refugia during the Quaternary period. Phylogenetic clustering in the IAA may partly result from vicariance events associated with coral reef fragmentation during the glacial periods of the Quaternary. Variation in the patterns among fish families further suggest that dispersal abilities may have interacted with past habitat availability in shaping the phylogenetic structure of tropical reef fish assemblages.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1633  
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Auteur Magris, R.A.; Andrello, M.; Pressey, R.L.; Mouillot, D.; Dalongeville, A.; Jacobi, M.N.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Biologically representative and well-connected marine reserves enhance biodiversity persistence in conservation planning Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Conserv. Lett.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 4 Pages Unsp-e12439  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; coral-reefs; design; larval dispersal; marine protected areas; marine reserve design; networks; population connectivity; protected areas; spatial planning; spatial prioritization  
  Résumé Current methods in conservation planning for promoting the persistence of biodiversity typically focus on either representing species geographic distributions or maintaining connectivity between reserves, but rarely both, and take a focal species, rather than a multispecies, approach. Here, we link prioritization methods with population models to explore the impact of integrating both representation and connectivity into conservation planning for species persistence. Using data on 288 Mediterranean fish species with varying conservation requirements, we show that: (1) considering both representation and connectivity objectives provides the best strategy for enhanced biodiversity persistence and (2) connectivity objectives were fundamental to enhancing persistence of small-ranged species, which are most in need of conservation, while the representation objective benefited only wide-ranging species. Our approach provides a more comprehensive appraisal of planning applications than approaches focusing on either representation or connectivity, and will hopefully contribute to build more effective reserve networks for the persistence of biodiversity.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1755-263x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2423  
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Auteur Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Bellwood, D.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Myers, R.; Vigliola, L.; D'Agata, S.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global patterns and predictors of tropical reef fish species richness Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 36 Numéro 12 Pages 1254-1262  
  Mots-Clés Biogeography; constraints; coral-reefs; dispersal; diversity; eastern; gradients; marine biodiversity; ocean; pacific; spatial autocorrelation  
  Résumé In the marine realm, the tropics host an extraordinary diversity of taxa but the drivers underlying the global distribution of marine organisms are still under scrutiny and we still lack an accurate global predictive model. Using a spatial database for 6336 tropical reef fishes, we attempted to predict species richness according to geometric, biogeographical and environmental explanatory variables. In particular, we aimed to evaluate and disentangle the predictive performances of temperature, habitat area, connectivity, mid-domain effect and biogeographical region on reef fish species richness. We used boosted regression trees, a flexible machine-learning technique, to build our predictive model and structural equation modeling to test for potential mediation effects' among predictors. Our model proved to be accurate, explaining 80% of the total deviance in fish richness using a cross-validated procedure. Coral reef area and biogeographical region were the primary predictors of reef fish species richness, followed by coast length, connectivity, mid-domain effect and sea surface temperature, with interactions between the region and other predictors. Important indirect effects of water temperature on reef fish richness, mediated by coral reef area, were also identified. The relationship between environmental predictors and species richness varied markedly among biogeographical regions. Our analysis revealed that a few easily accessible variables can accurately predict reef fish species richness. They also highlight concerns regarding ongoing environmental declines, with region-specific responses to variation in environmental conditions predicting a variable response to anthropogenic impacts.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 623  
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