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Auteur Maire, E.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Hoey, A.S.; Cinner, J.; Ferse, S.C.A.; Aliaume, C.; Booth, D.J.; Feary, D.A.; Kulbicki, M.; Sandin, S.A.; Vigliola, L.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Community-wide scan identifies fish species associated with coral reef services across the Indo-Pacific Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 285 Numéro 1883 Pages (down) 20181167  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate-change; coral reefs; diversity; ecosystem functioning; ecosystem services; ecosystem-function; fish community; impact; key species; multifunctionality; productivity; redundancy; resilience; resistance  
  Résumé Determining whether many functionally complementary species or only a subset of key species are necessary to maintain ecosystem functioning and services is a critical question in community ecology and biodiversity conservation. Identifying such key species remains challenging, especially in the tropics where many species co-occur and can potentially support the same or different processes. Here, we developed a new community-wide scan CWS) approach, analogous to the genome-wide scan, to identify fish species that significantly contribute, beyond the socio-environmental and species richness effects, to the biomass and coral cover on Indo-Pacific reefs. We found that only a limited set of species (51 out of approx. 400, = approx. 13%), belonging to various functional groups and evolutionary lineages, are strongly and positively associated with fish biomass and live coral cover. Many of these species have not previously been identified as functionally important, and thus may be involved in unknown, yet important, biological mechanisms that help sustain healthy and productive coral reefs. CWS has the potential to reveal species that are key to ecosystem functioning and services and to guide management strategies as well as new experiments to decipher underlying causal ecological processes.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2392  
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Auteur Montano, S.; Fattorini, S.; Parravicini, V.; Berumen, M.L.; Galli, P.; Maggioni, D.; Arrigoni, R.; Seveso, D.; Strona, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Corals hosting symbiotic hydrozoans are less susceptible to predation and disease Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 284 Numéro 1869 Pages (down) 20172405  
  Mots-Clés diversity; climate change; climate-change; great-barrier-reef; coral reefs; association; scleractinian corals; cnidaria; 1st record; acanthaster; bleaching; co-evolution; drupella; Drupella; zanclea  
  Résumé In spite of growing evidence that climate change may dramatically affect networks of interacting species, whether- and to what extent-ecological interactions can mediate species' responses to disturbances is an open question. Here we show how a largely overseen association such as that between hydrozoans and scleractinian corals could be possibly associated with a reduction in coral susceptibility to ever-increasing predator and disease outbreaks. We examined 2455 scleractinian colonies (from both Maldivian and the Saudi Arabian coral reefs) searching for non-random patterns in the occurrence of hydrozoans on corals showing signs of different health conditions (i.e. bleaching, algal overgrowth, corallivory and different coral diseases). We show that, after accounting for geographical, ecological and co-evolutionary factors, signs of disease and corallivory are significantly lower in coral colonies hosting hydrozoans than in hydrozoan-free ones. This finding has important implications for our understanding of the ecology of coral reefs, and for their conservation in the current scenario of global change, because it suggests that symbiotic hydrozoans may play an active role in protecting their scleractinian hosts from stresses induced by warming water temperatures.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2258  
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Auteur Cinner, J.E.; Maire, Eva; Huchery, C.; MacNeil, M.A.; Graham, N.A.J.; Mora, C.; McClanahan, T.R.; Barnes, M.L.; Kittinger, J.N.; Hicks, C.C.; D’Agata, S.; Hoey, A.S.; Gurney, G.G.; Feary, D.A.; Williams, I.D.; Kulbicki, M.; Vigliola, L.; Wantiez, L.; Edgar, G.J.; Stuart-Smith, R.D.; Sandin, S.A.; Green, A.; Hardt, M.J.; Beger, M.; Friedlander, A.M.; Wilson, S.K.; Brokovich, E.; Brooks, A.J.; Cruz-Motta, J.J.; Booth, D.J.; Chabanet, P.; Gough, C.; Tupper, M.; Ferse, S.C.A.; Sumaila, U.R.; Pardede, S.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Gravity of human impacts mediates coral reef conservation gains Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Pnas  
  Volume 115 Numéro 27 Pages (down) E6116-E6125  
  Mots-Clés coral reefs; fisheries; marine reserves; social-ecological; socioeconomic  
  Résumé Coral reefs provide ecosystem goods and services for millions of people in the tropics, but reef conditions are declining worldwide. Effective solutions to the crisis facing coral reefs depend in part on understanding the context under which different types of conservation benefits can be maximized. Our global analysis of nearly 1,800 tropical reefs reveals how the intensity of human impacts in the surrounding seascape, measured as a function of human population size and accessibility to reefs (“gravity”), diminishes the effectiveness of marine reserves at sustaining reef fish biomass and the presence of top predators, even where compliance with reserve rules is high. Critically, fish biomass in high-compliance marine reserves located where human impacts were intensive tended to be less than a quarter that of reserves where human impacts were low. Similarly, the probability of encountering top predators on reefs with high human impacts was close to zero, even in high-compliance marine reserves. However, we find that the relative difference between openly fished sites and reserves (what we refer to as conservation gains) are highest for fish biomass (excluding predators) where human impacts are moderate and for top predators where human impacts are low. Our results illustrate critical ecological trade-offs in meeting key conservation objectives: reserves placed where there are moderate-to-high human impacts can provide substantial conservation gains for fish biomass, yet they are unlikely to support key ecosystem functions like higher-order predation, which is more prevalent in reserve locations with low human impacts.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424, 1091-6490 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2365  
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Auteur McLean, M.; Auber, A.; Graham, N.A.J.; Houk, P.; Villeger, S.; Violle, C.; Thuiller, W.; Wilson, S.K.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Trait structure and redundancy determine sensitivity to disturbance in marine fish communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume 25 Numéro 10 Pages (down) 3424-3437  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate change; climate-change; coral reefs; coral-reef fish; diversity stability; ecological traits; ecosystem functioning; ecosystem productivity; egg buoyancy; English Channel; functional diversity; functional redundancy; north-sea; regime shifts; response diversity; vulnerability  
  Résumé Trait diversity is believed to influence ecosystem dynamics through links between organismal traits and ecosystem processes. Theory predicts that key traits and high trait redundancy-large species richness and abundance supporting the same traits-can buffer communities against environmental disturbances. While experiments and data from simple ecological systems lend support, large-scale evidence from diverse, natural systems under major disturbance is lacking. Here, using long-term data from both temperate (English Channel) and tropical (Seychelles Islands) fishes, we show that sensitivity to disturbance depends on communities' initial trait structure and initial trait redundancy. In both ecosystems, we found that increasing dominance by climatically vulnerable traits (e.g., small, fast-growing pelagics/corallivores) rendered fish communities more sensitive to environmental change, while communities with higher trait redundancy were more resistant. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the influence of trait structure and redundancy on community sensitivity over large temporal and spatial scales in natural systems. Our results exemplify a consistent link between biological structure and community sensitivity that may be transferable across ecosystems and taxa and could help anticipate future disturbance impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000486150200018 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2652  
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Auteur Maire, Eva; Cinner, J.; Velez, L.; Huchery, C.; Mora, C.; D'agata, S.; Vigliola, L.; Wantiez, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre How accessible are coral reefs to people? A global assessment based on travel time Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 19 Numéro 4 Pages (down) 351-360  
  Mots-Clés Accessibility; biodiversity; coral reefs; ecological-systems; fish assemblages; fisheries; marine protected areas; market access; population-density; predictors; social<bold>-</bold>ecological; species richness; travel time; vulnerability  
  Résumé The depletion of natural resources has become a major issue in many parts of the world, with the most accessible resources being most at risk. In the terrestrial realm, resource depletion has classically been related to accessibility through road networks. In contrast, in the marine realm, the impact on living resources is often framed into the Malthusian theory of human density around ecosystems. Here, we develop a new framework to estimate the accessibility of global coral reefs using potential travel time from the nearest human settlement or market. We show that 58% of coral reefs are located <30min from the nearest human settlement. We use a case study from New Caledonia to demonstrate that travel time from the market is a strong predictor of fish biomass on coral reefs. We also highlight a relative deficit of protection on coral reef areas near people, with disproportional protection on reefs far from people. This suggests that conservation efforts are targeting low-conflict reefs or places that may already be receiving de facto protection due to their isolation. Our global assessment of accessibility in the marine realm is a critical step to better understand the interplay between humans and resources.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1626  
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