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Auteur Pecoraro, C.; Babbucci, M.; Franch, R.; Rico, C.; Papetti, C.; Chassot, E.; Bodin, N.; Cariani, A.; Bargelloni, L.; Tinti, F. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) The population genomics of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) at global geographic scale challenges current stock delineation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 13890  
  Mots-Clés archival tag data; atlantic bluefin tuna; connectivity; conservation; divergence; fisheries management; habitat utilization; loci; pacific-ocean; relatedness  
  Résumé Yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, is one of the most important seafood commodities in the world. Despite its great biological and economic importance, conflicting evidence arises from classical genetic and tagging studies concerning the yellowfin tuna population structure at local and global oceanic scales. Access to more powerful and cost effective genetic tools would represent the first step towards resolving the population structure of yellowfin tuna across its distribution range. Using a panel of 939 neutral Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), and the most comprehensive data set of yellowfin samples available so far, we found genetic differentiation among the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans. The genetic stock structure analysis carried out with 33 outlier SNPs, putatively under selection, identified discrete populations within the Pacific Ocean and, for the first time, also within the Atlantic Ocean. Stock assessment approaches that consider genetic differences at neutral and adaptive genomic loci should be routinely implemented to check the status of the yellowfin tuna, prevent illegal trade, and develop more sustainable management measures.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2437  
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Auteur Kaplan, D.M.; Cuif, M.; Fauvelot, C.; Vigliola, L.; Nguyen-Huu, T.; Tiavouane, J.; Lett, C. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Uncertainty in empirical estimates of marine larval connectivity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 6 Pages 1723-1734  
  Mots-Clés connectivity; dispersal; Larval dispersal; management; model; parentage analysis; persistence; population; protected areas; Reef fish; reserves; self-recruitment; Transgenerational marking  
  Résumé Despite major advances in our capacity to measure marine larval connectivity (i.e. the pattern of transport of marine larvae from spawning to settlement sites) and the importance of these measurements for ecological and management questions, uncertainty in experimental estimates of marine larval connectivity has been given little attention. We review potential uncertainty sources in empirical larval connectivity studies and develop Bayesian statistical methods for estimating these uncertainties based on standard techniques in the mark-recapture and genetics literature. These methods are implemented in an existing R package for working with connectivity data, ConnMatTools, and applied to a number of published connectivity estimates. We find that the small sample size of collected settlers at destination sites is a dominant source of uncertainty in connectivity estimates in many published results. For example, widths of 95% CIs for relative connectivity, the value of which is necessarily between 0 and 1, exceeded 0.5 for many published connectivity results, complicating using individual results to conclude that marine populations are relatively closed or open. This “small sample size” uncertainty is significant even for studies with near-exhaustive sampling of spawners and settlers. Though largely ignored in the literature, the magnitude of this uncertainty is straightforward to assess. Better accountability of this and other uncertainties is needed in the future so that marine larval connectivity studies can fulfill their promises of providing important ecological insights and informing management questions (e.g. related to marine protected area network design, and stock structure of exploited organisms). In addition to using the statistical methods developed here, future studies should consistently evaluate and report a small number of critical factors, such as the exhaustivity of spawner and settler sampling, and the mating structure of target species in genetic studies.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2170  
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Auteur David, C.; Vaz, S.; Loots, C.; Antajan, E.; van der Molen, J.; Travers-Trolet, M. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Understanding winter distribution and transport pathways of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North Sea: coupling habitat and dispersal modelling approaches Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Invasions  
  Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 2605-2619  
  Mots-Clés a. agassiz; anchoa-mitchilli; black-sea; caspian sea; fish; Habitat modelling; Jellyfish; Mnemiopsis leidyi; narragansett bay; North Sea; Overwinter refuges; Particle tracking; population connectivity; Predation; rhode-island  
  Résumé The invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been reported in various coastal locations in the southern North Sea in the past years. Since 2009, International Bottom Trawl Surveys have recorded this species each winter in open waters. As this species, well-known for its dramatic disturbance of ecosystems, was expected not to be able to overwinter offshore it is crucial to understand its distribution dynamics. Two modelling methods, a quantile regression and a particle tracking model, were used (1) to identify habitats where the invasive ctenophore M. leidyi could survive the North Sea cold winters and (2) to investigate the dispersal of individuals between these different habitats, emphasizing favorable areas where sustainable populations could have been established. Temperature was found to be the crucial factor controlling the winter distribution of M. leidyi in the North Sea. High abundance predictions in winter were associated with low values of temperature, which characterise south-eastern coastal areas and estuaries influenced by riverine runoff. A retention-based M. leidyi population was indicated along the northern Dutch coast and German Bight and a transport-based population offshore from the western Danish coast. Individuals found in the open waters were transported from southern coasts of the North Sea, thus the open water population densities depend on the flux of offspring from these areas. This study provides the first estimates of the overwinter areas of this invasive species over the cold winters in the North Sea. Based on the agreement of habitat and dispersal model results, we conclude that M. leidyi has become established along south-eastern coasts of the North Sea where the environment conditions allows overwintering and it can be retained for later blooms.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1387-3547 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1457  
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Auteur Calo, A.; Lett, C.; Mourre, B.; Perez-Ruzafa, A.; Antonio Garcia-Charton, J. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Use of Lagrangian simulations to hindcast the geographical position of propagule release zones in a Mediterranean coastal fish Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Environ. Res.  
  Volume 134 Numéro Pages 16-27  
  Mots-Clés circulation; Mediterranean Sea; sea; dispersal; larval; habitat; marine protected areas; recruitment; variability; population connectivity; Dispersal distance; Lagrangian simulations; mesoscale eddies; Propagule release zones; Sea bream  
  Résumé The study of organism dispersal is fundamental for elucidating patterns of connectivity between populations, thus crucial for the design of effective protection and management strategies. This is especially challenging in the case of coastal fish, for which information on egg release zones (i.e. spawning grounds) is often lacking. Here we assessed the putative location of egg release zones of the saddled sea bream (Oblada melanura) along the southeastern coast of Spain in 2013. To this aim, we hindcasted propagule (egg and larva) dispersal using Lagrangian simulations, fed with species-specific information on early life history traits (ELTs), with two approaches: 1) back-tracking and 2) comparing settler distribution obtained from simulations to the analogous distribution resulting from otolith chemical analysis. Simulations were also used to assess which factors contributed the most to dispersal distances. Back-tracking simulations indicated that both the northern sector of the Murcia region and some traits of the North-African coast were hydrodynamically suitable to generate and drive the supply of larvae recorded along the coast of Murcia in 2013. With the second approach, based on the correlation between simulation outputs and field results (otolith chemical analysis), we found that the oceanographic characteristics of the study area could have determined the pattern of settler distribution recorded with otolith analysis in 2013 and inferred the geographical position of main O. melanura spawning grounds along the coast. Dispersal distance was found to be significantly affected by the geographical position of propagule release zones. The combination of methods used was the first attempt to assess the geographical position of propagule release zones in the Mediterranean Sea for O. melanura, and can represent a valuable approach for elucidating dispersal and connectivity patterns in other coastal species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0141-1136 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2313  
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Auteur GAGNAIRE, P.-A.; BROQUET, T.; AURELLE, D.; VIARD, F.; SOUISSI, A.; BONHOMME, F.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; Bierne, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Using neutral, selected, and hitchhiker loci to assess connectivity of marine populations in the genomic era Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Evolutionary Applications  
  Volume 8 Numéro 8 Pages 769-786  
  Mots-Clés connectivity; gene flow; marine conservation; population genomics; Population structure  
  Résumé Estimating the rate of exchange of individuals among populations is a central concern to evolutionary ecology and its applications to conservation and management. For instance, the efficiency of protected areas in sustaining locally endangered populations and ecosystems depends on reserve network connectivity. The population genetics theory offers a powerful framework for estimating dispersal distances and migration rates from molecular data. In the marine realm, however, decades of molecular studies have met limited success in inferring genetic connectivity, due to the frequent lack of spatial genetic structure in species exhibiting high fecundity and dispersal capabilities. This is especially true within biogeographic regions bounded by well-known hotspots of genetic differentiation. Here, we provide an overview of the current methods for estimating genetic connectivity using molecular markers and propose several directions for improving existing approaches using large population genomic datasets. We highlight several issues that limit the effectiveness of methods based on neutral markers when there is virtually no genetic differentiation among samples. We then focus on alternative methods based on markers influenced by selection. Although some of these methodologies are still underexplored, our aim was to stimulate new research to test how broadly they are applicable to nonmodel marine species. We argue that the increased ability to apply the concepts of cline analyses will improve dispersal inferences across physical and ecological barriers that reduce connectivity locally. We finally present how neutral markers hitchhiking with selected loci can also provide information about connectivity patterns within apparently well-mixed biogeographic regions. We contend that one of the most promising applications of population genomics is the use of outlier loci to delineate relevant conservation units and related eco-geographic features across which connectivity can be measured.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1434  
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