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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Lobreaux, S.; Fortin, M.-J.; Lasram, F.; Belmaker, J.; Rocklin, D.; Manel, S.
Titre (up) Geographic isolation and larval dispersal shape seascape genetic patterns differently according to spatial scale Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Evol. Appl.
Volume 11 Numéro 8 Pages 1437-1447
Mots-Clés caribbean reef fish; connectivity; divergent selection; ecological data; ecological genetics; landscape genetics; marine connectivity; marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mullus surmuletus; neighbor matrices; oceanography; population-structure; sea; seascape genetics; single nucleotide polymorphism; surmuletus
Résumé Genetic variation, as a basis of evolutionary change, allows species to adapt and persist in different climates and environments. Yet, a comprehensive assessment of the drivers of genetic variation at different spatial scales is still missing in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the influence of environment, geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on the variation in allele frequencies, using an extensive spatial sampling (47 locations) of the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) in the Mediterranean Sea. Univariate multiple regressions were used to test the influence of environment (salinity and temperature), geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequencies. We used Moran's eigenvector maps (db-MEMs) and asymmetric eigenvector maps (AEMs) to decompose geographic and dispersal distances in predictors representing different spatial scales. We found that salinity and temperature had only a weak effect on the variation in allele frequencies. Our results revealed the predominance of geographic isolation to explain variation in allele frequencies at large spatial scale (>1,000km), while larval dispersal was the major predictor at smaller spatial scale (<1,000km). Our findings stress the importance of including spatial scales to understand the drivers of spatial genetic variation. We suggest that larval dispersal allows to maintain gene flows at small to intermediate scale, while at broad scale, genetic variation may be mostly shaped by adult mobility, demographic history, or multigenerational stepping-stone dispersal. These findings bring out important spatial scale considerations to account for in the design of a protected area network that would efficiently enhance protection and persistence capacity of marine species.
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ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2422
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Auteur Leroy, B.; Dias, M.S.; Giraud, E.; Hugueny, B.; Jezequel, C.; Leprieur, F.; Oberdorff, T.; Tedesco, P.A.
Titre (up) Global biogeographical regions of freshwater fish species Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés actinopterygians; biogeographical regions; biogeography; bioregionalization; bioregions; connectivity; dispersal; diversity; evolution; freshwater fish; history; homogenization; network; patterns; richness; transition zones; vicariance; world; zoogeographical regions
Résumé Aim To define the major biogeographical regions and transition zones for freshwater fish species. Taxon Strictly freshwater species of actinopterygian fish (i.e. excluding marine and amphidromous fish families). Methods We based our bioregionalization on a global database of freshwater fish species occurrences in drainage basins, which, after filtering, includes 11,295 species in 2,581 basins. On the basis of this dataset, we generated a bipartite (basin-species) network upon which we applied a hierarchical clustering algorithm (the Map Equation) to detect regions. We tested the robustness of regions with a sensitivity analysis. We identified transition zones between major regions with the participation coefficient, indicating the degree to which a basin has species from multiple regions. Results Our bioregionalization scheme showed two major supercontinental regions (Old World and New World, 50% species of the world and 99.96% endemics each). Nested within these two supercontinental regions lie six major regions (Nearctic, Neotropical, Palearctic, Ethiopian, Sino-Oriental and Australian) with extremely high degrees of endemism (above 96% except for the Palearctic). Transition zones between regions were of limited extent compared to other groups of organisms. We identified numerous subregions with high diversity and endemism in tropical areas (e.g. Neotropical), and a few large subregions with low diversity and endemism at high latitudes (e.g. Palearctic). Main conclusions Our results suggest that regions of freshwater fish species were shaped by events of vicariance and geodispersal which were similar to other groups, but with freshwater-specific processes of isolation that led to extremely high degrees of endemism (far exceeding endemism rates of other continental vertebrates), specific boundary locations and limited extents of transition zones. The identified bioregions and transition zones of freshwater fish species reflect the strong isolation of freshwater fish faunas for the past 10-20 million years. The extremely high endemism and diversity of freshwater fish fauna raises many questions about the biogeographical consequences of current introductions and extinctions.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000484392300001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2637
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Auteur Andrello, M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Albouy, C.; Parravicini, V.; Scholtens, J.; Verley, P.; Barange, M.; Sumaila, U.R.; Manel, S.; Mouillot, D.
Titre (up) Global mismatch between fishing dependency and larval supply from marine reserves Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.
Volume 8 Numéro Pages 16039
Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; Connectivity; dispersal; fisheries management; impacts; Populations; protected areas; reef fishes; world
Résumé Marine reserves are viewed as flagship tools to protect exploited species and to contribute to the effective management of coastal fisheries. Yet, the extent to which marine reserves are globally interconnected and able to effectively seed areas, where fisheries are most critical for food and livelihood security is largely unknown. Using a hydrodynamic model of larval dispersal, we predict that most marine reserves are not interconnected by currents and that their potential benefits to fishing areas are presently limited, since countries with high dependency on coastal fisheries receive very little larval supply from marine reserves. This global mismatch could be reversed, however, by placing new marine reserves in areas sufficiently remote to minimize social and economic costs but sufficiently connected through sea currents to seed the most exploited fisheries and endangered ecosystems.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2162
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Auteur Huang, J.-L.; Andrello, M.; Martensen, A.C.; Saura, S.; Liu, D.-F.; He, J.-H.; Fortin, M.-J.
Titre (up) Importance of spatio-temporal connectivity to maintain species experiencing range shifts Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés climate change; climate-change; conservation; dispersal; dynamic network model; dynamics; habitat fragmentation; landscape connectivity; Ontario; package; patterns; quality; responses; species distribution
Résumé Climate change can affect the habitat resources available to species by changing habitat quantity, suitability and spatial configuration, which largely determine population persistence in the landscape. In this context, dispersal is a central process for species to track their niche. Assessments of the amount of reachable habitat (ARH) using static snap-shots do not account, however, for the temporal overlap of habitat patches that may enhance stepping-stone effects. Here, we quantified the impacts of climate change on the ARH using a spatio-temporal connectivity model. We first explored the importance of spatio-temporal connectivity relative to purely spatial connectivity in a changing climate by generating virtual species distributions and analyzed the relative effects of changes in habitat quantity, suitability and configuration. Then, we studied the importance of spatio-temporal connectivity in three vertebrate species with divergent responses to climate change in North America (grey wolf, Canadian lynx and white-tailed deer). We found that the spatio-temporal connectivity could enhance the stepping-stone effect for species predicted to experience range contractions, and the relative importance of the spatio-temporal connectivity increased with the reduction in habitat quantity and suitability. Conversely, for species that are likely to expand their ranges, spatio-temporal connectivity had no additional contribution to improve the ARH. We also found that changes in habitat amount (quantity and suitability) were more influential than changes in habitat configuration in determining the relative importance of spatio-temporal connectivity. We conclude that spatio-temporal connectivity may provide less biased and more realistic estimates of habitat connectivity than purely spatial connectivity.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000507381000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2705
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Auteur Dubois, M.; Rossi, V.; Ser-Giacomi, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Lopez, C.; Hernandez-Garcia, E.
Titre (up) Linking basin-scale connectivity, oceanography and population dynamics for the conservation and management of marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 25 Numéro 5 Pages 503-515
Mots-Clés coral-reef fish; dispersal; genetic-structure; Larval dispersal; local retention; local retention; marine connectivity; marine ecosystems; marine protected areas; mediterranean littoral fishes; Mediterranean Sea; metapopulation; pelagic larval duration; population dynamics; Population Genetics; protected-area design; sea; self-recruitment; sink dynamics; source
Résumé AimAssessing the spatial structure and dynamics of marine populations is still a major challenge in ecology. The need to manage marine resources from ecosystem and large-scale perspectives is recognized, but our partial understanding of oceanic connectivity limits the implementation of globally pertinent conservation planning. Based on a biophysical model for the entire Mediterranean Sea, this study takes an ecosystem approach to connectivity and provides a systematic characterization of broad-scale larval dispersal patterns. It builds on our knowledge of population dynamics and discusses the ecological and management implications. LocationThe semi-enclosed Mediterranean Sea and its marine ecosystems are used as a case study to investigate broad-scale connectivity patterns and to relate them to oceanography and population dynamics. MethodsA flow network is constructed by evenly subdividing the basin into sub-regions which are interconnected through the transport of larvae by ocean currents. It allows for the computation of various connectivity metrics required to evaluate larval retention and exchange. ResultsOur basin-scale model predicts that retention processes are weak in the open ocean while they are significant in the coastal ocean and are favoured along certain coastlines due to specific oceanographic features. Moreover, we show that wind-driven divergent (convergent, respectively) oceanic regions are systematically characterized by larval sources (sinks, respectively). Finally, although these connectivity metrics have often been studied separately in the literature, we demonstrate they are interrelated under particular conditions. Their integrated analysis facilitates the appraisal of population dynamics, informing both genetic and demographic connectivities. Main conclusionsThis modelling framework helps ecologists and geneticists to formulate improved hypotheses of population structures and gene flow patterns and to design their sampling strategy accordingly. It is also useful in the implementation and assessment of future protection strategies, such as coastal and offshore marine reserves, by accounting for large-scale dispersal patterns, a missing component of current ecosystem management.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1655
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