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Auteur Cahill, A.E.; De Jode, A.; Dubois, S.; Bouzaza, Z.; Aurelle, D.; Boissin, E.; Chabrol, O.; David, R.; Egea, E.; Ledoux, J.-B.; Mérigot, B.; Weber, A.A.-T.; Chenuil, A. doi  openurl
  Titre A multispecies approach reveals hot spots and cold spots of diversity and connectivity in invertebrate species with contrasting dispersal modes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.  
  Volume 26 Numéro 23 Pages (down) 6563-6577  
  Mots-Clés genetic diversity; dispersal; life-history traits; reef fishes; marine connectivity; pelagic larval duration; mediterranean sea; amphipholis-squamata; brooding brittle star; coralligenous assemblages; larvae; marine invertebrates; phylogeographical breaks; population structure; population genetic-structure; species genetic diversity correlation  
  Résumé Genetic diversity is crucial for species' maintenance and persistence, yet is often overlooked in conservation studies. Species diversity is more often reported due to practical constraints, but it is unknown if these measures of diversity are correlated. In marine invertebrates, adults are often sessile or sedentary and populations exchange genes via dispersal of gametes and larvae. Species with a larval period are expected to have more connected populations than those without larval dispersal. We assessed the relationship between measures of species and genetic diversity, and between dispersal ability and connectivity. We compiled data on genetic patterns and life history traits in nine species across five phyla. Sampling sites spanned 600km in the northwest Mediterranean Sea and focused on a 50-km area near Marseilles, France. Comparative population genetic approaches yielded three main results. (i) Species without larvae showed higher levels of genetic structure than species with free-living larvae, but the role of larval type (lecithotrophic or planktotrophic) was negligible. (ii) A narrow area around Marseilles, subject to offshore advection, limited genetic connectivity in most species. (iii) We identified sites with significant positive contributions to overall genetic diversity across all species, corresponding with areas near low human population densities. In contrast, high levels of human activity corresponded with a negative contribution to overall genetic diversity. Genetic diversity within species was positively and significantly linearly related to local species diversity. Our study suggests that local contribution to overall genetic diversity should be taken into account for future conservation strategies.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2262  
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Auteur David, C.; Vaz, S.; Loots, C.; Antajan, E.; van der Molen, J.; Travers-Trolet, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Understanding winter distribution and transport pathways of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North Sea: coupling habitat and dispersal modelling approaches Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Invasions  
  Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages (down) 2605-2619  
  Mots-Clés a. agassiz; anchoa-mitchilli; black-sea; caspian sea; fish; Habitat modelling; Jellyfish; Mnemiopsis leidyi; narragansett bay; North Sea; Overwinter refuges; Particle tracking; population connectivity; Predation; rhode-island  
  Résumé The invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been reported in various coastal locations in the southern North Sea in the past years. Since 2009, International Bottom Trawl Surveys have recorded this species each winter in open waters. As this species, well-known for its dramatic disturbance of ecosystems, was expected not to be able to overwinter offshore it is crucial to understand its distribution dynamics. Two modelling methods, a quantile regression and a particle tracking model, were used (1) to identify habitats where the invasive ctenophore M. leidyi could survive the North Sea cold winters and (2) to investigate the dispersal of individuals between these different habitats, emphasizing favorable areas where sustainable populations could have been established. Temperature was found to be the crucial factor controlling the winter distribution of M. leidyi in the North Sea. High abundance predictions in winter were associated with low values of temperature, which characterise south-eastern coastal areas and estuaries influenced by riverine runoff. A retention-based M. leidyi population was indicated along the northern Dutch coast and German Bight and a transport-based population offshore from the western Danish coast. Individuals found in the open waters were transported from southern coasts of the North Sea, thus the open water population densities depend on the flux of offspring from these areas. This study provides the first estimates of the overwinter areas of this invasive species over the cold winters in the North Sea. Based on the agreement of habitat and dispersal model results, we conclude that M. leidyi has become established along south-eastern coasts of the North Sea where the environment conditions allows overwintering and it can be retained for later blooms.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1387-3547 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1457  
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Auteur Kaplan, D.M.; Cuif, M.; Fauvelot, C.; Vigliola, L.; Nguyen-Huu, T.; Tiavouane, J.; Lett, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Uncertainty in empirical estimates of marine larval connectivity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 6 Pages (down) 1723-1734  
  Mots-Clés connectivity; dispersal; Larval dispersal; management; model; parentage analysis; persistence; population; protected areas; Reef fish; reserves; self-recruitment; Transgenerational marking  
  Résumé Despite major advances in our capacity to measure marine larval connectivity (i.e. the pattern of transport of marine larvae from spawning to settlement sites) and the importance of these measurements for ecological and management questions, uncertainty in experimental estimates of marine larval connectivity has been given little attention. We review potential uncertainty sources in empirical larval connectivity studies and develop Bayesian statistical methods for estimating these uncertainties based on standard techniques in the mark-recapture and genetics literature. These methods are implemented in an existing R package for working with connectivity data, ConnMatTools, and applied to a number of published connectivity estimates. We find that the small sample size of collected settlers at destination sites is a dominant source of uncertainty in connectivity estimates in many published results. For example, widths of 95% CIs for relative connectivity, the value of which is necessarily between 0 and 1, exceeded 0.5 for many published connectivity results, complicating using individual results to conclude that marine populations are relatively closed or open. This “small sample size” uncertainty is significant even for studies with near-exhaustive sampling of spawners and settlers. Though largely ignored in the literature, the magnitude of this uncertainty is straightforward to assess. Better accountability of this and other uncertainties is needed in the future so that marine larval connectivity studies can fulfill their promises of providing important ecological insights and informing management questions (e.g. related to marine protected area network design, and stock structure of exploited organisms). In addition to using the statistical methods developed here, future studies should consistently evaluate and report a small number of critical factors, such as the exhaustivity of spawner and settler sampling, and the mating structure of target species in genetic studies.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2170  
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Auteur Metcalfe, K.; Vaughan, G.; Vaz, S.; Smith, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Spatial, socio-economic, and ecological implications of incorporating minimum size constraints in marine protected area network design Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Conservation Biology  
  Volume 29 Numéro 6 Pages (down) 1615-1625  
  Mots-Clés conectividad; Connectivity; derrame y exportación; Marxan; MinPatch; planeación sistemática de la conservación; priorización de la conservación espacial; spatial conservation prioritization; spill-over and export; systematic conservation planning; viabilidad; viability  
  Résumé Marine protected areas (MPAs) are the cornerstone of most marine conservation strategies, but the effectiveness of each one partly depends on its size and distance to other MPAs in a network. Despite this, current recommendations on ideal MPA size and spacing vary widely, and data are lacking on how these constraints might influence the overall spatial characteristics, socio-economic impacts, and connectivity of the resultant MPA networks. To address this problem, we tested the impact of applying different MPA size constraints in English waters. We used the Marxan spatial prioritization software to identify a network of MPAs that met conservation feature targets, whilst minimizing impacts on fisheries; modified the Marxan outputs with the MinPatch software to ensure each MPA met a minimum size; and used existing data on the dispersal distances of a range of species found in English waters to investigate the likely impacts of such spatial constraints on the region's biodiversity. Increasing MPA size had little effect on total network area or the location of priority areas, but as MPA size increased, fishing opportunity cost to stakeholders increased. In addition, as MPA size increased, the number of closely connected sets of MPAs in networks and the average distance between neighboring MPAs decreased, which consequently increased the proportion of the planning region that was isolated from all MPAs. These results suggest networks containing large MPAs would be more viable for the majority of the region's species that have small dispersal distances, but dispersal between MPA sets and spill-over of individuals into unprotected areas would be reduced. These findings highlight the importance of testing the impact of applying different MPA size constraints because there are clear trade-offs that result from the interaction of size, number, and distribution of MPAs in a network.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1523-1739 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1458  
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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Lobreaux, S.; Fortin, M.-J.; Lasram, F.; Belmaker, J.; Rocklin, D.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Geographic isolation and larval dispersal shape seascape genetic patterns differently according to spatial scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Evol. Appl.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 8 Pages (down) 1437-1447  
  Mots-Clés caribbean reef fish; connectivity; divergent selection; ecological data; ecological genetics; landscape genetics; marine connectivity; marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mullus surmuletus; neighbor matrices; oceanography; population-structure; sea; seascape genetics; single nucleotide polymorphism; surmuletus  
  Résumé Genetic variation, as a basis of evolutionary change, allows species to adapt and persist in different climates and environments. Yet, a comprehensive assessment of the drivers of genetic variation at different spatial scales is still missing in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the influence of environment, geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on the variation in allele frequencies, using an extensive spatial sampling (47 locations) of the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) in the Mediterranean Sea. Univariate multiple regressions were used to test the influence of environment (salinity and temperature), geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequencies. We used Moran's eigenvector maps (db-MEMs) and asymmetric eigenvector maps (AEMs) to decompose geographic and dispersal distances in predictors representing different spatial scales. We found that salinity and temperature had only a weak effect on the variation in allele frequencies. Our results revealed the predominance of geographic isolation to explain variation in allele frequencies at large spatial scale (>1,000km), while larval dispersal was the major predictor at smaller spatial scale (<1,000km). Our findings stress the importance of including spatial scales to understand the drivers of spatial genetic variation. We suggest that larval dispersal allows to maintain gene flows at small to intermediate scale, while at broad scale, genetic variation may be mostly shaped by adult mobility, demographic history, or multigenerational stepping-stone dispersal. These findings bring out important spatial scale considerations to account for in the design of a protected area network that would efficiently enhance protection and persistence capacity of marine species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2422  
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