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Auteur (up) David, C.; Vaz, S.; Loots, C.; Antajan, E.; van der Molen, J.; Travers-Trolet, M.
Titre Understanding winter distribution and transport pathways of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North Sea: coupling habitat and dispersal modelling approaches Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Invasions
Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 2605-2619
Mots-Clés a. agassiz; anchoa-mitchilli; black-sea; caspian sea; fish; Habitat modelling; Jellyfish; Mnemiopsis leidyi; narragansett bay; North Sea; Overwinter refuges; Particle tracking; population connectivity; Predation; rhode-island
Résumé The invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been reported in various coastal locations in the southern North Sea in the past years. Since 2009, International Bottom Trawl Surveys have recorded this species each winter in open waters. As this species, well-known for its dramatic disturbance of ecosystems, was expected not to be able to overwinter offshore it is crucial to understand its distribution dynamics. Two modelling methods, a quantile regression and a particle tracking model, were used (1) to identify habitats where the invasive ctenophore M. leidyi could survive the North Sea cold winters and (2) to investigate the dispersal of individuals between these different habitats, emphasizing favorable areas where sustainable populations could have been established. Temperature was found to be the crucial factor controlling the winter distribution of M. leidyi in the North Sea. High abundance predictions in winter were associated with low values of temperature, which characterise south-eastern coastal areas and estuaries influenced by riverine runoff. A retention-based M. leidyi population was indicated along the northern Dutch coast and German Bight and a transport-based population offshore from the western Danish coast. Individuals found in the open waters were transported from southern coasts of the North Sea, thus the open water population densities depend on the flux of offspring from these areas. This study provides the first estimates of the overwinter areas of this invasive species over the cold winters in the North Sea. Based on the agreement of habitat and dispersal model results, we conclude that M. leidyi has become established along south-eastern coasts of the North Sea where the environment conditions allows overwintering and it can be retained for later blooms.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1387-3547 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1457
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Auteur (up) Dubois, M.; Rossi, V.; Ser-Giacomi, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Lopez, C.; Hernandez-Garcia, E.
Titre Linking basin-scale connectivity, oceanography and population dynamics for the conservation and management of marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 25 Numéro 5 Pages 503-515
Mots-Clés coral-reef fish; dispersal; genetic-structure; Larval dispersal; local retention; local retention; marine connectivity; marine ecosystems; marine protected areas; mediterranean littoral fishes; Mediterranean Sea; metapopulation; pelagic larval duration; population dynamics; Population Genetics; protected-area design; sea; self-recruitment; sink dynamics; source
Résumé AimAssessing the spatial structure and dynamics of marine populations is still a major challenge in ecology. The need to manage marine resources from ecosystem and large-scale perspectives is recognized, but our partial understanding of oceanic connectivity limits the implementation of globally pertinent conservation planning. Based on a biophysical model for the entire Mediterranean Sea, this study takes an ecosystem approach to connectivity and provides a systematic characterization of broad-scale larval dispersal patterns. It builds on our knowledge of population dynamics and discusses the ecological and management implications. LocationThe semi-enclosed Mediterranean Sea and its marine ecosystems are used as a case study to investigate broad-scale connectivity patterns and to relate them to oceanography and population dynamics. MethodsA flow network is constructed by evenly subdividing the basin into sub-regions which are interconnected through the transport of larvae by ocean currents. It allows for the computation of various connectivity metrics required to evaluate larval retention and exchange. ResultsOur basin-scale model predicts that retention processes are weak in the open ocean while they are significant in the coastal ocean and are favoured along certain coastlines due to specific oceanographic features. Moreover, we show that wind-driven divergent (convergent, respectively) oceanic regions are systematically characterized by larval sources (sinks, respectively). Finally, although these connectivity metrics have often been studied separately in the literature, we demonstrate they are interrelated under particular conditions. Their integrated analysis facilitates the appraisal of population dynamics, informing both genetic and demographic connectivities. Main conclusionsThis modelling framework helps ecologists and geneticists to formulate improved hypotheses of population structures and gene flow patterns and to design their sampling strategy accordingly. It is also useful in the implementation and assessment of future protection strategies, such as coastal and offshore marine reserves, by accounting for large-scale dispersal patterns, a missing component of current ecosystem management.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1655
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Auteur (up) GAGNAIRE, P.-A.; BROQUET, T.; AURELLE, D.; VIARD, F.; SOUISSI, A.; BONHOMME, F.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; Bierne, N.
Titre Using neutral, selected, and hitchhiker loci to assess connectivity of marine populations in the genomic era Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Evolutionary Applications
Volume 8 Numéro 8 Pages 769-786
Mots-Clés connectivity; gene flow; marine conservation; population genomics; Population structure
Résumé Estimating the rate of exchange of individuals among populations is a central concern to evolutionary ecology and its applications to conservation and management. For instance, the efficiency of protected areas in sustaining locally endangered populations and ecosystems depends on reserve network connectivity. The population genetics theory offers a powerful framework for estimating dispersal distances and migration rates from molecular data. In the marine realm, however, decades of molecular studies have met limited success in inferring genetic connectivity, due to the frequent lack of spatial genetic structure in species exhibiting high fecundity and dispersal capabilities. This is especially true within biogeographic regions bounded by well-known hotspots of genetic differentiation. Here, we provide an overview of the current methods for estimating genetic connectivity using molecular markers and propose several directions for improving existing approaches using large population genomic datasets. We highlight several issues that limit the effectiveness of methods based on neutral markers when there is virtually no genetic differentiation among samples. We then focus on alternative methods based on markers influenced by selection. Although some of these methodologies are still underexplored, our aim was to stimulate new research to test how broadly they are applicable to nonmodel marine species. We argue that the increased ability to apply the concepts of cline analyses will improve dispersal inferences across physical and ecological barriers that reduce connectivity locally. We finally present how neutral markers hitchhiking with selected loci can also provide information about connectivity patterns within apparently well-mixed biogeographic regions. We contend that one of the most promising applications of population genomics is the use of outlier loci to delineate relevant conservation units and related eco-geographic features across which connectivity can be measured.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1434
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Auteur (up) Huang, J.-L.; Andrello, M.; Martensen, A.C.; Saura, S.; Liu, D.-F.; He, J.-H.; Fortin, M.-J.
Titre Importance of spatio-temporal connectivity to maintain species experiencing range shifts Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés climate change; climate-change; conservation; dispersal; dynamic network model; dynamics; habitat fragmentation; landscape connectivity; Ontario; package; patterns; quality; responses; species distribution
Résumé Climate change can affect the habitat resources available to species by changing habitat quantity, suitability and spatial configuration, which largely determine population persistence in the landscape. In this context, dispersal is a central process for species to track their niche. Assessments of the amount of reachable habitat (ARH) using static snap-shots do not account, however, for the temporal overlap of habitat patches that may enhance stepping-stone effects. Here, we quantified the impacts of climate change on the ARH using a spatio-temporal connectivity model. We first explored the importance of spatio-temporal connectivity relative to purely spatial connectivity in a changing climate by generating virtual species distributions and analyzed the relative effects of changes in habitat quantity, suitability and configuration. Then, we studied the importance of spatio-temporal connectivity in three vertebrate species with divergent responses to climate change in North America (grey wolf, Canadian lynx and white-tailed deer). We found that the spatio-temporal connectivity could enhance the stepping-stone effect for species predicted to experience range contractions, and the relative importance of the spatio-temporal connectivity increased with the reduction in habitat quantity and suitability. Conversely, for species that are likely to expand their ranges, spatio-temporal connectivity had no additional contribution to improve the ARH. We also found that changes in habitat amount (quantity and suitability) were more influential than changes in habitat configuration in determining the relative importance of spatio-temporal connectivity. We conclude that spatio-temporal connectivity may provide less biased and more realistic estimates of habitat connectivity than purely spatial connectivity.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000507381000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2705
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Auteur (up) Jaspers, C.; Huwer, B.; Antajan, E.; Hosia, A.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Biastoch, A.; Angel, D.; Asmus, R.; Augustin, C.; Bagheri, S.; Beggs, S.E.; Balsby, T.J.S.; Boersma, M.; Bonnet, D.; Christensen, J.T.; Daenhardt, A.; Delpy, F.; Falkenhaug, T.; Finenko, G.; Fleming, N.E.C.; Fuentes, V.; Galil, B.; Gittenberger, A.; Griffin, D.C.; Haslob, H.; Javidpour, J.; Kamburska, L.; Kube, S.; Langenberg, V.T.; Lehtiniemi, M.; Lombard, F.; Malzahn, A.; Marambio, M.; Mihneva, V.; Moller, L.F.; Niermann, U.; Okyar, M.I.; Ozdemir, Z.B.; Pitois, S.; Reusch, T.B.H.; Robbens, J.; Stefanova, K.; Thibault, D.; van der Veer, H.W.; Vansteenbrugge, L.; van Walraven, L.; Wozniczka, A.
Titre Ocean current connectivity propelling the secondary spread of a marine invasive comb jelly across western Eurasia Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 27 Numéro 7 Pages 814-827
Mots-Clés abundance; biodiversity; biological invasions; black-sea; caspian sea; consequences; ctenophore mnemiopsis-leidyi; gelatinous zooplankton; invasion corridors; invasive species; jellyfish; larval transport; marine connectivity; Mnemiopsis leidyi; north-sea; range expansion; source populations; source-sink dynamics; waters; zooplankton
Résumé Aim: Invasive species are of increasing global concern. Nevertheless, the mechanisms driving further distribution after the initial establishment of non-native species remain largely unresolved, especially in marine systems. Ocean currents can be a major driver governing range occupancy, but this has not been accounted for in most invasion ecology studies so far. We investigate how well initial establishment areas are interconnected to later occupancy regions to test for the potential role of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics in order to infer invasion corridors and the source-sink dynamics of a non-native holoplanktonic biological probe species on a continental scale. Location: Western Eurasia. Time period: 1980s-2016. Major taxa studied: 'Comb jelly' Mnemiopsis leidyi. Methods: Based on 12,400 geo-referenced occurrence data, we reconstruct the invasion history of M. leidyi in western Eurasia. We model ocean currents and calculate their stability to match the temporal and spatial spread dynamics with large-scale connectivity patterns via ocean currents. Additionally, genetic markers are used to test the predicted connectivity between subpopulations. Results: Ocean currents can explain secondary spread dynamics, matching observed range expansions and the timing of first occurrence of our holoplanktonic non-native biological probe species, leading to invasion corridors in western Eurasia. In northern Europe, regional extinctions after cold winters were followed by rapid recolonizations at a speed of up to 2,000 km per season. Source areas hosting year-round populations in highly interconnected regions can re-seed genotypes over large distances after local extinctions. Main conclusions: Although the release of ballast water from container ships may contribute to the dispersal of non-native species, our results highlight the importance of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics. Highly interconnected areas hosting invasive species are crucial for secondary spread dynamics on a continental scale. Invasion risk assessments should consider large-scale connectivity patterns and the potential source regions of non-native marine species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2390
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