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Auteur (up) Carpentier, A.S.; Berthe, C.; Ender, I.; Jaine, F.R.A.; Mourier, J.; Stevens, G.; De Rosemont, M.; Clua, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Preliminary insights into the population characteristics and distribution of reef (Mobula alfredi) and oceanic (M. birostris) manta rays in French Polynesia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume 38 Numéro 6 Pages 1197-1210  
  Mots-Clés aggregation; australia; bottle-nosed dolphins; california; Citizen science; conservation; Ecotourism management; habitat use; identification; marine park; movements; sharks; Site fidelity; Spatial connectivity; Sympatry  
  Résumé In French Polynesia, both currently recognized manta ray species, Mobula alfredi and M. birostris, are observed. Despite being an important cultural asset and generating significant economic benefits through manta ray watching tourism, published data on the ecology and threats to these species in the region are scarce. Based on an 18-year dataset of sighting records collected by citizen scientists and during two scientific expeditions, this study provides the first insights into the population characteristics and regional distribution of the two manta ray species in French Polynesia. A total of 1347 manta ray photographs (1337 for M. alfredi and 10 for M. birostris) were examined for the period January 2001-December 2017, with photo-identification techniques leading to the successful identification of 317 individual M. alfredi and 10 individual M. birostris throughout the Society, Tuamotu and Marquesas Islands. We provide the first confirmation of sympatric distribution of both species in the Society Islands. Our results highlight strong and long-term site fidelity of M. alfredi individuals to certain aggregation sites (> 9 years for 16 individuals) and reveal some degree of connectivity between populations, with 10 individuals recorded moving between islands located up to 50 km apart. Analysis of photographs of individuals bearing sub-lethal injuries (n = 68) suggests that M. alfredi are more likely to be injured at inhabited islands (Maupiti or Bora Bora; 75% of all injured individuals) than at uninhabited islands, with 75% of injuries related to boat propeller strikes and fishing gear entanglements. Our findings emphasize the need for further research to allow for a comprehensive evaluation of population structure, size and threats to manta rays in this region.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000496024100010 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2658  
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Auteur (up) Cuif, M.; Keller, F.; Chateau, O.; Kaplan, D.; Labonne, M.; Lett, C.; Vigliola, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Evaluation of transgenerational isotope labeling of embryonic otoliths in a coral reef damselfish with single and repeated injections of enriched (137)Barium Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology  
  Volume 459 Numéro Pages 151-159  
  Mots-Clés Barium isotopes; Connectivity; Dascyllus aruanus; La-Icp-Ms; microchemistry; Otolith; Transgenerational marking  
  Résumé Quantifying the larval dispersal component of population connectivity is extremely challenging due to the many difficulties associated with directly observing larvae in their marine environment. Transgenerational isotope labeling is a recent empirical technique that addresses this challenge. It relies on the transmission of an artificially enriched stable isotope (e.g., Ba-137) from gravid females to the embryonic otoliths of their offspring, allowing for mass permanent marking of larvae. Before implementing transgenerational isotope labeling in the wild, it is essential to investigate the transmission longevity of the mark from females to larvae and to assess the potential negative effects on females and their offspring. We injected females of the Humbug damselfish, Dascyllus aruanus, with an enriched Ba-137 solution and reared the resulting progeny to test the marking success and the transmission longevity of the mark, as well as determine potential effects of transgenerational isotope labeling on spawning frequency and size of 1-day eggs and 2-day larvae. Three different single-injection dosages (0.5, 1 and 5 mu g of Ba-137 g(-1) fish weight) were tested, as well as monthly repeated injections of the lowest dosage over a whole reproductive season. We implemented a new method that allows extracting otoliths of newly hatched larvae and analyzing them using laser ablation coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We showed that for D. aruanus, injection with a low dose (0.5 mu g Ba-137 g(-1), fish weight) produced consistently significantly marked larvae with a half-life for successful enriched Ba mark transmission of approximately 1 month, and that monthly repeated injections of this dose did not negatively impact spawning success or condition of eggs and larvae. Monthly repeated injections of enriched Ba isotope injections at 0.5 mu g Ba-137 g(-1) fish weight will therefore present an effective means of mass marking D. aruanus larvae throughout an entire reproductive season.  
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  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 357  
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Auteur (up) Dalleau, M.; Kramer-Schadt, S.; Gangat, Y.; Bourjea, J.; Lajoie, G.; Grimm, V. doi  openurl
  Titre Modeling the emergence of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots of the green sea turtle Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés aldabra atoll; chelonia-mydas; connectivity; corridors; individual-based model; leatherback turtles; marine turtles; migration; movement; penghu archipelago; population-dynamics; remigration intervals; satellite-tracking; sea turtle; wan-an island  
  Résumé Environmental factors shape the spatial distribution and dynamics of populations. Understanding how these factors interact with movement behavior is critical for efficient conservation, in particular for migratory species. Adult female green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, migrate between foraging and nesting sites that are generally separated by thousands of kilometers. As an emblematic endangered species, green turtles have been intensively studied, with a focus on nesting, migration, and foraging. Nevertheless, few attempts integrated these behaviors and their trade-offs by considering the spatial configurations of foraging and nesting grounds as well as environmental heterogeneity like oceanic currents and food distribution. We developed an individual-based model to investigate the impact of local environmental conditions on emerging migratory corridors and reproductive output and to thereby identify conservation priority sites. The model integrates movement, nesting, and foraging behavior. Despite being largely conceptual, the model captured realistic movement patterns which confirm field studies. The spatial distribution of migratory corridors and foraging hot spots was mostly constrained by features of the regional landscape, such as nesting site locations, distribution of feeding patches, and oceanic currents. These constraints also explained the mixing patterns in regional forager communities. By implementing alternative decision strategies of the turtles, we found that foraging site fidelity and nesting investment, two characteristics of green turtles' biology, are favorable strategies under unpredictable environmental conditions affecting their habitats. Based on our results, we propose specific guidelines for the regional conservation of green turtles as well as future research suggestions advancing spatial ecology of sea turtles. Being implemented in an easy to learn open-source software, our model can coevolve with the collection and analysis of new data on energy budget and movement into a generic tool for sea turtle research and conservation. Our modeling approach could also be useful for supporting the conservation of other migratory marine animals.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000481747800001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2621  
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Auteur (up) Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Lobreaux, S.; Fortin, M.-J.; Lasram, F.; Belmaker, J.; Rocklin, D.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Geographic isolation and larval dispersal shape seascape genetic patterns differently according to spatial scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Evol. Appl.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 8 Pages 1437-1447  
  Mots-Clés caribbean reef fish; connectivity; divergent selection; ecological data; ecological genetics; landscape genetics; marine connectivity; marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mullus surmuletus; neighbor matrices; oceanography; population-structure; sea; seascape genetics; single nucleotide polymorphism; surmuletus  
  Résumé Genetic variation, as a basis of evolutionary change, allows species to adapt and persist in different climates and environments. Yet, a comprehensive assessment of the drivers of genetic variation at different spatial scales is still missing in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the influence of environment, geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on the variation in allele frequencies, using an extensive spatial sampling (47 locations) of the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) in the Mediterranean Sea. Univariate multiple regressions were used to test the influence of environment (salinity and temperature), geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequencies. We used Moran's eigenvector maps (db-MEMs) and asymmetric eigenvector maps (AEMs) to decompose geographic and dispersal distances in predictors representing different spatial scales. We found that salinity and temperature had only a weak effect on the variation in allele frequencies. Our results revealed the predominance of geographic isolation to explain variation in allele frequencies at large spatial scale (>1,000km), while larval dispersal was the major predictor at smaller spatial scale (<1,000km). Our findings stress the importance of including spatial scales to understand the drivers of spatial genetic variation. We suggest that larval dispersal allows to maintain gene flows at small to intermediate scale, while at broad scale, genetic variation may be mostly shaped by adult mobility, demographic history, or multigenerational stepping-stone dispersal. These findings bring out important spatial scale considerations to account for in the design of a protected area network that would efficiently enhance protection and persistence capacity of marine species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2422  
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Auteur (up) David, C.; Vaz, S.; Loots, C.; Antajan, E.; van der Molen, J.; Travers-Trolet, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Understanding winter distribution and transport pathways of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North Sea: coupling habitat and dispersal modelling approaches Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Invasions  
  Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 2605-2619  
  Mots-Clés a. agassiz; anchoa-mitchilli; black-sea; caspian sea; fish; Habitat modelling; Jellyfish; Mnemiopsis leidyi; narragansett bay; North Sea; Overwinter refuges; Particle tracking; population connectivity; Predation; rhode-island  
  Résumé The invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been reported in various coastal locations in the southern North Sea in the past years. Since 2009, International Bottom Trawl Surveys have recorded this species each winter in open waters. As this species, well-known for its dramatic disturbance of ecosystems, was expected not to be able to overwinter offshore it is crucial to understand its distribution dynamics. Two modelling methods, a quantile regression and a particle tracking model, were used (1) to identify habitats where the invasive ctenophore M. leidyi could survive the North Sea cold winters and (2) to investigate the dispersal of individuals between these different habitats, emphasizing favorable areas where sustainable populations could have been established. Temperature was found to be the crucial factor controlling the winter distribution of M. leidyi in the North Sea. High abundance predictions in winter were associated with low values of temperature, which characterise south-eastern coastal areas and estuaries influenced by riverine runoff. A retention-based M. leidyi population was indicated along the northern Dutch coast and German Bight and a transport-based population offshore from the western Danish coast. Individuals found in the open waters were transported from southern coasts of the North Sea, thus the open water population densities depend on the flux of offspring from these areas. This study provides the first estimates of the overwinter areas of this invasive species over the cold winters in the North Sea. Based on the agreement of habitat and dispersal model results, we conclude that M. leidyi has become established along south-eastern coasts of the North Sea where the environment conditions allows overwintering and it can be retained for later blooms.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1387-3547 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1457  
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