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Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Auber, A.
Titre Interspecific differences in environmental response blur trait dynamics in classic statistical analyses Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.
Volume 166 Numéro 12 Pages 152
Mots-Clés climate-change; community composition; ecology; framework; functional diversity; impact; rules
Résumé Trait-based ecology strives to better understand how species, through their bio-ecological traits, respond to environmental changes, and influence ecosystem functioning. Identifying which traits are most responsive to environmental changes can provide insight for understanding community structuring and developing sustainable management practices. However, misinterpretations are possible, because standard statistical methods (e.g., principal component analysis and linear regression) for identifying and ranking the responses of different traits to environmental changes ignore interspecific differences. Here, using both artificial data and real-world examples from marine fish communities, we show how considering species-specific responses can lead to drastically different results than standard community-level methods. By demonstrating the potential impacts of interspecific differences on trait dynamics, we illuminate a major, yet rarely discussed issue, highlighting how analytical misinterpretations can confound our basic understanding of trait responses, which could have important consequences for biodiversity conservation.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000496131000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2660
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Auteur Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J.; Sole, J.; Palomera, I.; Christensen, V.
Titre Modelling the cumulative spatial-temporal effects of environmental drivers and fishing in a NW Mediterranean marine ecosystem Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Model.
Volume 331 Numéro Pages 100-114
Mots-Clés acoustic estimation; anchovy engraulis-encrasicolus; climate-change; Cumulative effects; Ecopath with Ecosim; environment; european hake; exploited ecosystems; fishing; food-web model; food webs; hake merluccius-merluccius; protected areas; south catalan sea; trawling disturbance
Résumé To realistically predict spatial-temporal dynamics of species in marine ecosystems it is essential to consider environmental conditions in conjunction with human activities and food web dynamics. In this study, we used Ecospace, the spatial-temporal dynamic module of Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) food web model, to drive a spatially explicit marine food web model representing the Southern Catalan Sea (NW Mediterranean) with various environmental drivers and with fishing. We then evaluated the individual and joint effects of environmental conditions and fishing in various compartments of the food web. First we used a previously developed EwE model fitted to time series of data from 1978 to 2010 as a baseline configuration. The model included 40 functional groups and four fishing fleets. We first ran the original Ecospace spatial-temporal dynamic model using the original habitat configuration, in addition to fishing, and we predicted species distributions and abundances. Afterwards, we ran the new habitat foraging capacity model using the most important environmental drivers linked with the Ebro River delta dynamics (salinity, temperature, and primary production), in addition to depth, substrate and fishing, and we compared results with those from the original implementation of Ecospace. Three commercial species, European hake (Merluccius merluccius), anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and sardine (Sardina pilchardus), were used to analyse results. Species distributions more closely matched the empirical information available from the study area when using the new habitat capacity model. Results suggested that the historical impacts of fishing and environmental conditions on the biomass and distributions of hake, anchovy and sardine were not additive, but mainly cumulative with a synergistic or antagonistic effect. Fishing had the highest impact on spatial modelling results while the spatial distribution of primary producers and depth followed in importance. This study contributes to the development of more reliable predictions of regional change in marine ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1643
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Auteur Durant, J.M.; Molinero, J.-C.; Ottersen, G.; Reygondeau, G.; Stige, L.C.; Langangen, O.
Titre Contrasting effects of rising temperatures on trophic interactions in marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep
Volume 9 Numéro Pages 15213
Mots-Clés biodiversity; calanus-finmarchicus; climate-change; fluctuations; life-history; mallotus-villosus; match; mismatch; phenology; thermal tolerance
Résumé In high-latitude marine environments, primary producers and their consumers show seasonal peaks of abundance in response to annual light cycle, water column stability and nutrient availability. Predatory species have adapted to this pattern by synchronising life-history events such as reproduction with prey availability. However, changing temperatures may pose unprecedented challenges by decoupling the predator-prey interactions. Here we build a predator-prey model accounting for the full life-cycle of fish and zooplankton including their phenology. The model assumes that fish production is bottom-up controlled by zooplankton prey abundance and match or mismatch between predator and prey phenology, and is parameterised based on empirical findings of how climate influences phenology and prey abundance. With this model, we project possible climate-warming effects on match-mismatch dynamics in Arcto-boreal and temperate biomes. We find a strong dependence on synchrony with zooplankton prey in the Arcto-boreal fish population, pointing towards a possible pronounced population decline with warming because of frequent desynchronization with its zooplankton prey. In contrast, the temperate fish population appears better able to track changes in prey timing and hence avoid strong population decline. These results underline that climate change may enhance the risks of predator-prey seasonal asynchrony and fish population declines at higher latitudes.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse (up)
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000491859500003 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2668
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Auteur Andrello, M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Albouy, C.; Parravicini, V.; Scholtens, J.; Verley, P.; Barange, M.; Sumaila, U.R.; Manel, S.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Global mismatch between fishing dependency and larval supply from marine reserves Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.
Volume 8 Numéro Pages 16039
Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; Connectivity; dispersal; fisheries management; impacts; Populations; protected areas; reef fishes; world
Résumé Marine reserves are viewed as flagship tools to protect exploited species and to contribute to the effective management of coastal fisheries. Yet, the extent to which marine reserves are globally interconnected and able to effectively seed areas, where fisheries are most critical for food and livelihood security is largely unknown. Using a hydrodynamic model of larval dispersal, we predict that most marine reserves are not interconnected by currents and that their potential benefits to fishing areas are presently limited, since countries with high dependency on coastal fisheries receive very little larval supply from marine reserves. This global mismatch could be reversed, however, by placing new marine reserves in areas sufficiently remote to minimize social and economic costs but sufficiently connected through sea currents to seed the most exploited fisheries and endangered ecosystems.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse (up)
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2162
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Auteur Kadowaki, K.; Barbera, C.G.; Godsoe, W.; Delsuc, F.; Mouquet, N.
Titre Predicting biotic interactions and their variability in a changing environment Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.
Volume 12 Numéro 5 Pages 20151073
Mots-Clés Bacteria; climate-change; climate change; distribution models; diversity; extinction risk; global change; microcosm; phylogeny; predictive ecology; range; responses; shifts
Résumé Global environmental change is altering the patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Observation and theory suggest that species' distributions and abundances depend on a suite of processes, notably abiotic filtering and biotic interactions, both of which are constrained by species' phylogenetic history. Models predicting species distribution have historically mostly considered abiotic filtering and are only starting to integrate biotic interaction. However, using information on present interactions to forecast the future of biodiversity supposes that biotic interactions will not change when species are confronted with new environments. Using bacterial microcosms, we illustrate how biotic interactions can vary along an environmental gradient and how this variability can depend on the phylogenetic distance between interacting species.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse (up)
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1653
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