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Auteur de Fouw, J.; Govers, L.L.; van de Koppel, J.; van Belzen, J.; Dorigo, W.; Cheikh, M.A.S.; Christianen, M.J.A.; van der Reijden, K.J.; van der Geest, M.; Piersma, T.; Smolders, A.J.P.; Olff, H.; Lamers, L.P.M.; van Gils, J.A.; van der Heide, T.
Titre Drought, Mutualism Breakdown, and Landscape-Scale Degradation of Seagrass Beds Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Curr. Biol.
Volume 26 Numéro 8 Pages 1051-1056
Mots-Clés banc-darguin; bivalvia; climate-change; communities; critical transitions; ecosystems; foundation; mauritania; ocean acidification; perspective
Résumé In many marine ecosystems, biodiversity critically depends on foundation species such as corals and seagrasses that engage in mutualistic interactions [1-3]. Concerns grow that environmental disruption of marine mutualisms exacerbates ecosystem degradation, with breakdown of the obligate coral mutualism (“coral bleaching”) being an iconic example [2, 4, 5]. However, as these mutualisms are mostly facultative rather than obligate, it remains unclear whether mutualism breakdown is a common risk in marine ecosystems, and thus a potential accelerator of ecosystem degradation. Here, we provide evidence that. drought triggered landscape-scale seagrass degradation and show the consequent failure of a facultative mutualistic feedback between seagrass and sulfide-consuming lucinid bivalves that in turn appeared to exacerbate the observed collapse. Local climate and remote sensing analyses revealed seagrass collapse after a summer with intense low-tide drought stress. Potential analysis a novel approach to detect feedback-mediated state shifts-revealed two attractors (healthy and degraded states) during the collapse, suggesting that the drought disrupted internal feedbacks to cause abrupt, patch-wise degradation. Field measurements comparing degraded patches that were healthy before the collapse with patches that remained healthy demonstrated that bivalves declined dramatically in degrading patches with associated high sediment sulfide concentrations, confirming the breakdown of the mutualistic seagrass-lucinid feedback. Our findings indicate that drought triggered mutualism breakdown, resulting in toxic sulfide concentrations that aggravated seagrass degradation. We conclude that external disturbances can cause sudden breakdown of facultative marine mutualistic feedbacks. As this may amplify ecosystem degradation, we suggest including mutualisms in marine conservation and restoration approaches.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1664
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Auteur Albo-Puigserver, M.; Munoz, A.; Navarro, J.; Coll, M.; Pethybridge, H.; Sanchez, S.; Palomera, I.
Titre Ecological energetics of forage fish from the Mediterranean Sea: Seasonal dynamics and interspecific differences Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 140 Numéro Pages 74-82
Mots-Clés anchovy engraulis-encrasicolus; Bioenergetics; climate-change; diet composition; Energy density; environmental variability; feeding-habits; food webs; horse mackerel; Mediterranean Sea; north aegean sea; osteichthyes carangidae; sardine sardina-pilchardus; small pelagic fish
Résumé Small and medium pelagic fishes play a central role in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to top predators. In this study, direct calorimetry was used to analyze the energy density of seven pelagic species collected over four seasons from the western Mediterranean Sea: anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus, sardine Sardina pilchardus, round sardinella Sardinella aurita, horse mackerels Trachurus trachurus and T. mediterraneus, and mackerels Scomber scombrus and S. colias. Inter-specific differences in energy density were linked to spawning period, energy allocation strategies for reproduction and growth, and feeding ecologies. Energy density of each species varied over time, with the exception of S. colitis, likely due to its high energetic requirements related to migration throughout the year. In general, higher energy density was observed in spring for all species, regardless of their breeding strategy, probably as a consequence of the late-winter phytoplankton bloom. These results provide new insights into the temporal availability of energy in the pelagic ecosystem of the Mediterranean Sea, which are pivotal for understanding how the population dynamics of small and medium pelagic fishes and their predators may respond to environmental changes and fishing impacts. In addition, the differences found in energy density between species highlighted the importance of using species specific energy values in ecosystem assessment tools such as bioenergetic and food web models.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2176
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Auteur Briscoe, D.K.; Hobday, A.J.; Carlisle, A.; Scales, K.; Eveson, J.P.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Druon, J.N.; Fromentin, J.-M.
Titre Ecological bridges and barriers in pelagic ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 140 Numéro Pages 182-192
Mots-Clés arctic marine mammals; atlantic bluefin tuna; Billfish; Brazilian episode; climate-change; el-nino; interannual variation; Marine mammal; marlin makaira-nigricans; Migration corridors; Oceanographic features; population connectivity; satellite archival tags; sea-turtles; site fidelity; species distribution; thunnus-maccoyii; Tuna
Résumé Many highly mobile species are known to use persistent pathways or corridors to move between habitat patches in which conditions are favorable for particular activities, such as breeding or foraging. In the marine realm, environmental variability can lead to the development of temporary periods of anomalous oceanographic conditions that can connect individuals to areas of habitat outside a population's usual range, or alternatively, restrict individuals from areas usually within their range, thus acting as ecological bridges or ecological barriers. These temporary features can result in novel or irregular trophic interactions and changes in population spatial dynamics, and, therefore, may have significant implications for management of marine ecosystems. Here, we provide evidence of ecological bridges and barriers in different ocean regions, drawing upon five case studies in which particular oceanographic conditions have facilitated or restricted the movements of individuals from highly migratory species. We discuss the potential population-level significance of ecological bridges and barriers, with respect to the life history characteristics of different species, and inter- and intra-population variability in habitat use. Finally, we summarize the persistence of bridge dynamics with time, our ability to monitor bridges and barriers in a changing climate, and implications for forecasting future climate mediated ecosystem change.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2178
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Auteur Lucena-Fredou, F.; Kell, L.; Fredou, T.; Gaertner, D.; Potier, M.; Bach, P.; Travassos, P.; Hazin, F.; Menard, F.
Titre Vulnerability of teleosts caught by the pelagic tuna longline fleets in South Atlantic and Western Indian Oceans Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 140 Numéro Pages 230-241
Mots-Clés Bycatch; climate-change; ecological risk-assessment; exploitation status; Fishery management; impact; life-history strategies; management; marine fishes; Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis; risk; Sustainability; trawl fishery
Résumé Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis (PSA) is a methodology for evaluating the vulnerability of a stock based on its biological productivity and susceptibility to fishing. In this study, we evaluated the vulnerability of 60 stocks of tuna, billfishes and other teleosts caught by the tuna longline fleets operating in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean using a semi-quantitative PSA. We (a) evaluated the vulnerability of the species in the study areas; (b) compared the vulnerability of target and non-target species and oceans; (c) analyzed the sensitivity of data entry; and (d) compared the results of the PSA to other fully quantitative assessment methods. Istiophoridae exhibited the highest scores for vulnerability. The top 10 species at risk were: Atlantic Istiophorus albicans; Indian Ocean Istiompax indica; Atlantic Makaira nigricans and Thunnus alalunga; Indian Ocean Xiphias gladius; Atlantic T. albacares, Gempylus serpens, Ranzania laevis and X. gladius; and Indian Ocean T. alalunga. All species considered at high risk were targeted or were commercialized bycatch, except for the Atlantic G. serpens and R. laevis which.were discarded, and may be considered as a false positive. Those species and others at high risk should be prioritized for further assessment and/or data collection. Most species at moderate risk were bycatch species kept for sale. Conversely, species classified at low risk were mostly discarded. Overall, species at high risk were overfished and/or subjected to overfishing. Moreover, all species considered to be within extinction risk (Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable) were in the high risk category. The good concordance between approaches corroborates the results of our analysis. PSA is not a replacement for traditional stock assessments, where a stock is assessed at regular intervals to provide management advice. It is of importance, however, where there is uncertainty about catches and life history parameters, since it can identify species at risk, and where management action and data collection is required, e.g. for many species at high and most at moderate risk in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans.
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ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2179
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Auteur D'Agata, S.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Andrefouet, S.; Bellwood, D.R.; Cinner, J.E.; Cowman, P.F.; Kronen, M.; Pinca, S.; Vigliola, L.
Titre Human-Mediated Loss of Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity in Coral Reef Fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Current Biology
Volume 24 Numéro 5 Pages 555-560
Mots-Clés biodiversity hotspots; climate-change; communities; evolutionary; great-barrier-reef; land-use; parrotfishes; patterns; productivity; resilience
Résumé Beyond the loss of species richness [1-3], human activities may also deplete the breadth of evolutionary history (phylogenetic diversity) and the diversity of roles (functional diversity) carried out by species within communities, two overlooked components of biodiversity. Both are, however, essential to sustain ecosystem functioning and the associated provision of ecosystem services, particularly under fluctuating environmental conditions [1-7]. We quantified the effect of human activities on the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional diversity of fish communities in coral reefs, while teasing apart the influence of biogeography and habitat along a gradient of human pressure across the Pacific Ocean. We detected nonlinear relationships with significant breaking points in the impact of human population density on phylogenetic and functional diversity of parrot-fishes, at 25 and 15 inhabitants/km(2), respectively, while parrot-fish species richness decreased linearly along the same population gradient. Over the whole range, species richness decreased by 11.7%, while phylogenetic and functional diversity dropped by 35.8% and 46.6%, respectively. Our results call for caution when using species richness as a benchmark for measuring the status of ecosystems since it appears to be less responsive to variation in human population densities than its phylogenetic and functional counterparts, potentially imperiling the functioning of coral reef ecosystems.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 645
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