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Auteur Descombes, P.; Leprieur, F.; Albouy, C.; Heine, C.; Pellissier, L.
Titre Spatial imprints of plate tectonics on extant richness of terrestrial vertebrates Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 44 Numéro 5 Pages (down) 1185-1197
Mots-Clés american biotic interchange; amphibian; andean uplift; bird; climate-change; continental drift; diversification rates; diversity; global patterns; indo-pacific; large-scale patterns; madagascar; mammal; plate tectonics; sea-level; Southeast Asia; species richness; Wallace line; wallaces line
Résumé AimIn interaction with past climate changes, it is likely that plate tectonics contributed to the shaping of current global species diversity, but so far this has not been statistically quantified at the global level. Here, we tested whether plate tectonics since the breakup of Gondwana left an imprint on current patterns of species richness of amphibians, birds and mammals. LocationGlobal. MethodsWe reconstructed the absolute positions of continental plates since the Early Cretaceous and used this information to derive variables of latitudinal shifts and potential exchanges among landmasses that could have modulated species richness. Using a multi-model inference approach combining both contemporary and historical variables, we quantified the relative importance of variables related to plate tectonics in explaining the spatial variation of the richness of amphibians, birds and mammals. Next, we employed a moving window approach to test whether plate tectonics left a more marked imprint in specific regions. ResultsPlatetectonics left an imprint on current patterns of vertebrate species richness in geologically singular regions, especially in the Indo-Australian Archipelago and the region comprising eastern Africa and Madagascar. For birds and mammals, but not amphibians, we found a marked contrast in species richness across Australia and Southeast Asia and eastern Africa and Madagascar associated with plate tectonics. Moreover, the relationship between species richness and plate tectonics varied across taxonomic orders for birds and mammals. Main conclusionsWhile no general imprint of plate tectonics was detected at the global scale, our regional analysis highlighted a substantial role of geodynamics in shaping current patterns of vertebrate species richness in Southeast Asia and Madagascar. Future studies should integrate the full range of processes associated with plate tectonics, including orogeny, not considered here.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2129
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Auteur Gravel, D.; Poisot, T.; Albouy, C.; Velez, L.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Inferring food web structure from predator-prey body size relationships Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Methods in Ecology and Evolution
Volume 4 Numéro 11 Pages (down) 1083-1090
Mots-Clés Body size; Niche model; biodiversity; climate-change; community; constraints; ecological networks; ecology; ecosystems; food web; impacts; interaction strengths; metaweb; models; species richness
Résumé 1. Current global changes make it important to be able to predict which interactions will occur in the emerging ecosystems. Most of the current methods to infer the existence of interactions between two species require a good knowledge of their behaviour or a direct observation of interactions. In this paper, we overcome these limitations by developing a method, inspired from the niche model of food web structure, using the statistical relationship between predator and prey body size to infer the matrix of potential interactions among a pool of species. 2. The novelty of our approach is to infer, for any species of a given species pool, the three species-specific parameters of the niche model. The method applies to both local and metaweb scales. It allows one to evaluate the feeding interactions of a new species entering the community. 3. We find that this method gives robust predictions of the structure of food webs and that its efficiency is increased when the strength of the body-size relationship between predators and preys increases. 4. We finally illustrate the potential of the method to infer the metaweb structure of pelagic fishes of the Mediterranean sea under different global change scenarios.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2041-210x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 674
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Auteur de Fouw, J.; Govers, L.L.; van de Koppel, J.; van Belzen, J.; Dorigo, W.; Cheikh, M.A.S.; Christianen, M.J.A.; van der Reijden, K.J.; van der Geest, M.; Piersma, T.; Smolders, A.J.P.; Olff, H.; Lamers, L.P.M.; van Gils, J.A.; van der Heide, T.
Titre Drought, Mutualism Breakdown, and Landscape-Scale Degradation of Seagrass Beds Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Curr. Biol.
Volume 26 Numéro 8 Pages (down) 1051-1056
Mots-Clés banc-darguin; bivalvia; climate-change; communities; critical transitions; ecosystems; foundation; mauritania; ocean acidification; perspective
Résumé In many marine ecosystems, biodiversity critically depends on foundation species such as corals and seagrasses that engage in mutualistic interactions [1-3]. Concerns grow that environmental disruption of marine mutualisms exacerbates ecosystem degradation, with breakdown of the obligate coral mutualism (“coral bleaching”) being an iconic example [2, 4, 5]. However, as these mutualisms are mostly facultative rather than obligate, it remains unclear whether mutualism breakdown is a common risk in marine ecosystems, and thus a potential accelerator of ecosystem degradation. Here, we provide evidence that. drought triggered landscape-scale seagrass degradation and show the consequent failure of a facultative mutualistic feedback between seagrass and sulfide-consuming lucinid bivalves that in turn appeared to exacerbate the observed collapse. Local climate and remote sensing analyses revealed seagrass collapse after a summer with intense low-tide drought stress. Potential analysis a novel approach to detect feedback-mediated state shifts-revealed two attractors (healthy and degraded states) during the collapse, suggesting that the drought disrupted internal feedbacks to cause abrupt, patch-wise degradation. Field measurements comparing degraded patches that were healthy before the collapse with patches that remained healthy demonstrated that bivalves declined dramatically in degrading patches with associated high sediment sulfide concentrations, confirming the breakdown of the mutualistic seagrass-lucinid feedback. Our findings indicate that drought triggered mutualism breakdown, resulting in toxic sulfide concentrations that aggravated seagrass degradation. We conclude that external disturbances can cause sudden breakdown of facultative marine mutualistic feedbacks. As this may amplify ecosystem degradation, we suggest including mutualisms in marine conservation and restoration approaches.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1664
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Auteur Cazelles, K.; Mouquet, N.; Mouillot, D.; Gravel, D.
Titre On the integration of biotic interaction and environmental constraints at the biogeographical scale Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 39 Numéro 10 Pages (down) 921-931
Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate-change; cooccurrence; distributions; ecological communities; evolutionary; food webs; networks; niche; species distribution models
Résumé Biogeography is primarily concerned with the spatial distribution of biodiversity, including performing scenarios in a changing environment. The efforts deployed to develop species distribution models have resulted in predictive tools, but have mostly remained correlative and have largely ignored biotic interactions. Here we build upon the theory of island biogeography as a first approximation to the assembly dynamics of local communities embedded within a metacommunity context. We include all types of interactions and introduce environmental constraints on colonization and extinction dynamics. We develop a probabilistic framework based on Markov chains and derive probabilities for the realization of species assemblages, rather than single species occurrences. We consider the expected distribution of species richness under different types of ecological interactions. We also illustrate the potential of our framework by studying the interplay between different ecological requirements, interactions and the distribution of biodiversity along an environmental gradient. Our framework supports the idea that the future research in biogeography requires a coherent integration of several ecological concepts into a single theory in order to perform conceptual and methodological innovations, such as the switch from single-species distribution to community distribution.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1683
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Auteur Jorgensen, C.; Peck, M.A.; Antognarelli, F.; Azzurro, E.; Burrows, M.T.; Cheung, W.W.L.; Cucco, A.; Holt, R.E.; Huebert, K.B.; Marras, S.; McKenzie, D.; Metcalfe, J.; Perez-Ruzafa, A.; Sinerchia, M.; Steffensen, J.F.; Teal, L.R.; Domenici, P.
Titre Conservation physiology of marine fishes: advancing the predictive capacity of models Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.
Volume 8 Numéro 6 Pages (down) 900-903
Mots-Clés atlantic cod; body-mass; climate-change; climate effects; conservation physiology; gadus-morhua; metabolic scope; modelling; ocean; species distribution; temperature
Résumé At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology to different extents, ranging from no explicit consideration to detailed physiological mechanisms, and across scales from a single fish to global fishery resources. Biologists from different sub-disciplines are collaborating to rise to the challenge of projecting future changes in distribution and productivity, assessing risks for local populations, or predicting and mitigating the spread of invasive species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1432
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