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Auteur (up) McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Auber, A.
Titre Interspecific differences in environmental response blur trait dynamics in classic statistical analyses Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.
Volume 166 Numéro 12 Pages 152
Mots-Clés climate-change; community composition; ecology; framework; functional diversity; impact; rules
Résumé Trait-based ecology strives to better understand how species, through their bio-ecological traits, respond to environmental changes, and influence ecosystem functioning. Identifying which traits are most responsive to environmental changes can provide insight for understanding community structuring and developing sustainable management practices. However, misinterpretations are possible, because standard statistical methods (e.g., principal component analysis and linear regression) for identifying and ranking the responses of different traits to environmental changes ignore interspecific differences. Here, using both artificial data and real-world examples from marine fish communities, we show how considering species-specific responses can lead to drastically different results than standard community-level methods. By demonstrating the potential impacts of interspecific differences on trait dynamics, we illuminate a major, yet rarely discussed issue, highlighting how analytical misinterpretations can confound our basic understanding of trait responses, which could have important consequences for biodiversity conservation.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000496131000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2660
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Auteur (up) Monnet, A.C.; Jiguet, F.; Meynard, C.N.; Mouillot, D.; Mouquet, N.; Thuiller, W.; Devictor, V.
Titre Asynchrony of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity in birds Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography
Volume 23 Numéro 7 Pages 780-788
Mots-Clés Beta diversity; Rao; assemblages; beta components; biological diversity; breeding bird survey; climate-change; communities; conservation; evolutionary; functional traits; homogenization; indexes; patterns; species turnover; temporal dynamics
Résumé Aim We assessed the temporal trends of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversities in the French avifauna over the last two decades. Additionally, we investigated whether and how this multifaceted approach to biodiversity dynamics can reveal an increasing similarity of local assemblages in terms of species, traits and/or lineages. Location France. Methods We analysed a large-scale dataset that recorded annual changes in the abundance of 116 breeding birds in France between 1989 and 2012. We decomposed and analysed the spatio-temporal dynamics of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversities and each of their -, – and -components. We also calculated the trend in the mean specialization of bird communities to track the relative success of specialist versus generalist species within communities during the same period. Results We found large variation within and among the temporal trends of each biodiversity facet. On average, we found a marked increase in species and phylogenetic diversity over the period considered, but no particular trend was found for functional diversity. Conversely, changes in -diversities for the three facets were characterized by independent and nonlinear trends. We also found a general increase in the local occurrence and abundance of generalist species within local communities. Main conclusions These results highlight a relative asynchrony of the different biodiversity facets occurring at large spatial scales. We show why a multifaceted approach to biodiversity dynamics is needed to better describe and understand changes in community composition in macroecology and conservation biogeography.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 455
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Auteur (up) Montano, S.; Fattorini, S.; Parravicini, V.; Berumen, M.L.; Galli, P.; Maggioni, D.; Arrigoni, R.; Seveso, D.; Strona, G.
Titre Corals hosting symbiotic hydrozoans are less susceptible to predation and disease Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.
Volume 284 Numéro 1869 Pages 20172405
Mots-Clés diversity; climate change; climate-change; great-barrier-reef; coral reefs; association; scleractinian corals; cnidaria; 1st record; acanthaster; bleaching; co-evolution; drupella; Drupella; zanclea
Résumé In spite of growing evidence that climate change may dramatically affect networks of interacting species, whether- and to what extent-ecological interactions can mediate species' responses to disturbances is an open question. Here we show how a largely overseen association such as that between hydrozoans and scleractinian corals could be possibly associated with a reduction in coral susceptibility to ever-increasing predator and disease outbreaks. We examined 2455 scleractinian colonies (from both Maldivian and the Saudi Arabian coral reefs) searching for non-random patterns in the occurrence of hydrozoans on corals showing signs of different health conditions (i.e. bleaching, algal overgrowth, corallivory and different coral diseases). We show that, after accounting for geographical, ecological and co-evolutionary factors, signs of disease and corallivory are significantly lower in coral colonies hosting hydrozoans than in hydrozoan-free ones. This finding has important implications for our understanding of the ecology of coral reefs, and for their conservation in the current scenario of global change, because it suggests that symbiotic hydrozoans may play an active role in protecting their scleractinian hosts from stresses induced by warming water temperatures.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2258
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Auteur (up) Mouillot, D.; Graham, N.A.J.; Villeger, S.; Mason, N.W.H.; Bellwood, D.R.
Titre A functional approach reveals community responses to disturbances Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Trends in Ecology & Evolution
Volume 28 Numéro 3 Pages 167-177
Mots-Clés 4th-corner problem; biological traits; climate-change; extinction; fish communities; induced tree mortality; multiple traits; plant-communities; risk; species traits; wood density
Résumé Understanding the processes shaping biological communities under multiple disturbances is a core challenge in ecology and conservation science. Traditionally, ecologists have explored linkages between the severity and type of disturbance and the taxonomic structure of communities. Recent advances in the application of species traits, to assess the functional structure of communities, have provided an alternative approach that responds rapidly and consistently across taxa and ecosystems to multiple disturbances. Importantly, trait-based metrics may provide advanced warning of disturbance to ecosystems because they do not need species loss to be reactive. Here, we synthesize empirical evidence and present a theoretical framework, based on species positions in a functional space, as a tool to reveal the complex nature of change in disturbed ecosystems.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 402
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Auteur (up) Oberdorff, T.; Dias, M.S.; Jezequel, C.; Albert, J.S.; Arantes, C.C.; Bigorne, R.; Carvajal-Valleros, F.M.; De Wever, A.; Frederico, R.G.; Hidalgo, M.; Hugueny, B.; Leprieur, F.; Maldonado, M.; Maldonado-Ocampo, J.; Martens, K.; Ortega, H.; Sarmiento, J.; Tedesco, P.A.; Torrente-Vilara, G.; Winemiller, K.O.; Zuanon, J.
Titre Unexpected fish diversity gradients in the Amazon basin Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Adv.
Volume 5 Numéro 9 Pages eaav8681
Mots-Clés biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change; communities; convergence; diversification; fragmentation; patterns; river; speciation
Résumé Using the most comprehensive fish occurrence database, we evaluated the importance of ecological and historical drivers in diversity patterns of subdrainage basins across the Amazon system. Linear models reveal the influence of climatic conditions, habitat size and sub-basin isolation on species diversity. Unexpectedly, the species richness model also highlighted a negative upriver-downriver gradient, contrary to predictions of increasing richness at more downriver locations along fluvial gradients. This reverse gradient may be linked to the history of the Amazon drainage network, which, after isolation as western and eastern basins throughout the Miocene, only began flowing eastward 1-9 million years (Ma) ago. Our results suggest that the main center of fish diversity was located westward, with fish dispersal progressing eastward after the basins were united and the Amazon River assumed its modern course toward the Atlantic. This dispersal process seems not yet achieved, suggesting a recent formation of the current Amazon system.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000491128800037 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2681
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