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Auteur Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J.; Sole, J.; Palomera, I.; Christensen, V.
Titre Modelling the cumulative spatial-temporal effects of environmental drivers and fishing in a NW Mediterranean marine ecosystem Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Ecol. Model.
Volume 331 Numéro Pages 100-114
Mots-Clés acoustic estimation; anchovy engraulis-encrasicolus; climate-change; Cumulative effects; Ecopath with Ecosim; environment; european hake; exploited ecosystems; fishing; food-web model; food webs; hake merluccius-merluccius; protected areas; south catalan sea; trawling disturbance
Résumé To realistically predict spatial-temporal dynamics of species in marine ecosystems it is essential to consider environmental conditions in conjunction with human activities and food web dynamics. In this study, we used Ecospace, the spatial-temporal dynamic module of Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) food web model, to drive a spatially explicit marine food web model representing the Southern Catalan Sea (NW Mediterranean) with various environmental drivers and with fishing. We then evaluated the individual and joint effects of environmental conditions and fishing in various compartments of the food web. First we used a previously developed EwE model fitted to time series of data from 1978 to 2010 as a baseline configuration. The model included 40 functional groups and four fishing fleets. We first ran the original Ecospace spatial-temporal dynamic model using the original habitat configuration, in addition to fishing, and we predicted species distributions and abundances. Afterwards, we ran the new habitat foraging capacity model using the most important environmental drivers linked with the Ebro River delta dynamics (salinity, temperature, and primary production), in addition to depth, substrate and fishing, and we compared results with those from the original implementation of Ecospace. Three commercial species, European hake (Merluccius merluccius), anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and sardine (Sardina pilchardus), were used to analyse results. Species distributions more closely matched the empirical information available from the study area when using the new habitat capacity model. Results suggested that the historical impacts of fishing and environmental conditions on the biomass and distributions of hake, anchovy and sardine were not additive, but mainly cumulative with a synergistic or antagonistic effect. Fishing had the highest impact on spatial modelling results while the spatial distribution of primary producers and depth followed in importance. This study contributes to the development of more reliable predictions of regional change in marine ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1643
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Auteur Ramirez-Romero, E.; Molinero, J.C.; Sommer, U.; Salhi, N.; Yahia, O.K.-D.; Yahia, M.N.D.
Titre Phytoplankton size changes and diversity loss in the southwestern Mediterranean Sea in relation to long-term hydrographic variability Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume 235 Numéro Pages 106574
Mots-Clés bay; climate-change; Diversity loss; dynamics; evolution; jellyfish; marine; Nanophytoplankton; Ocean warming; patterns; Phytoplankton diversity; plankton communities; Size structural changes; Southwestern mediterranean; temperature; time-series
Résumé Structural changes in plankton primary producers have large implications for food web dynamics, energy fluxes and the vertical export of biogenic particulate carbon. Here we examine phytoplankton data spanning the period 1993-2008 from the Bay of Tunis, southwestern Mediterranean Sea, in relation to long term hydroclimate variability. We show a conspicuous shift in the structure of the phytoplankton community characterized by an increase of small-sized species and diversity loss, revealing a dominance of smaller blooming diatoms and cyanobacteria. Such changes were concurrent with marked modifications in hydroclimatic patterns experienced in the Bay of Tunis consisting of a shift towards enhanced winter precipitation together with rising temperatures. This novel study shows an overall rise in the proportion of small phytoplankton cells and a decreasing trend in phytoplankton diversity in the southern Mediterranean area. These findings warn of a potential decline of trophic efficiency and lesser food web stability resulting from mean size reduction and the diversity loss.
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ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000527915700034 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2766
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Auteur Puerta, P.; Johnson, C.; Carreiro-Silva, M.; Henry, L.-A.; Kenchington, E.; Morato, T.; Kazanidis, G.; Luis Rueda, J.; Urra, J.; Ross, S.; Wei, C.-L.; Manuel Gonzalez-Irusta, J.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Orejas, C.
Titre Influence of Water Masses on the Biodiversity and Biogeography of Deep-Sea Benthic Ecosystems in the North Atlantic Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages 239
Mots-Clés antarctic intermediate water; biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change impacts; coral lophelia-pertusa; deep-sea; food-supply mechanisms; global habitat suitability; meridional overturning circulation; ne atlantic; North Atlantic; ocean acidification; porcupine seabight; rockall trough margin; vulnerable marine ecosystems; water masses
Résumé Circulation patterns in the North Atlantic Ocean have changed and re-organized multiple times over millions of years, influencing the biodiversity, distribution, and connectivity patterns of deep-sea species and ecosystems. In this study, we review the effects of the water mass properties (temperature, salinity, food supply, carbonate chemistry, and oxygen) on deep-sea benthic megafauna (from species to community level) and discussed in future scenarios of climate change. We focus on the key oceanic controls on deep-sea megafauna biodiversity and biogeography patterns. We place particular attention on cold-water corals and sponges, as these are ecosystem-engineering organisms that constitute vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME) with high associated biodiversity. Besides documenting the current state of the knowledge on this topic, a future scenario for water mass properties in the deep North Atlantic basin was predicted. The pace and severity of climate change in the deep-sea will vary across regions. However, predicted water mass properties showed that all regions in the North Atlantic will be exposed to multiple stressors by 2100, experiencing at least one critical change in water temperature (+2 degrees C), organic carbon fluxes (reduced up to 50%), ocean acidification (pH reduced up to 0.3), aragonite saturation horizon (shoaling above 1000 m) and/or reduction in dissolved oxygen (> 5%). The northernmost regions of the North Atlantic will suffer the greatest impacts. Warmer and more acidic oceans will drastically reduce the suitable habitat for ecosystem-engineers, with severe consequences such as declines in population densities, even compromising their long-term survival, loss of biodiversity and reduced biogeographic distribution that might compromise connectivity at large scales. These effects can be aggravated by reductions in carbon fluxes, particularly in areas where food availability is already limited. Declines in benthic biomass and biodiversity will diminish ecosystem services such as habitat provision, nutrient cycling, etc. This study shows that the deep-sea VME affected by contemporary anthropogenic impacts and with the ongoing climate change impacts are unlikely to withstand additional pressures from more intrusive human activities. This study serves also as a warning to protect these ecosystems through regulations and by tempering the ongoing socio-political drivers for increasing exploitation of marine resources.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2767
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Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Lindegren, M.; Villeger, S.; Engelhard, G.; Murgier, J.; Auber, A.
Titre Fish communities diverge in species but converge in traits over three decades of warming Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Glob. Change Biol.
Volume 25 Numéro 11 Pages 3972-3984
Mots-Clés biodiversity; biotic homogenization; climate change; climate-change; community ecology; consequences; ecological traits; ecology; ecosystem functioning; fisheries; functional diversity; north-sea; patterns; plant traits; regime shift; shelf seas; spatio-temporal dynamics
Résumé Describing the spatial and temporal dynamics of communities is essential for understanding the impacts of global environmental change on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Trait-based approaches can provide better insight than species-based (i.e. taxonomic) approaches into community assembly and ecosystem functioning, but comparing species and trait dynamics may reveal important patterns for understanding community responses to environmental change. Here, we used a 33-year database of fish monitoring to compare the spatio-temporal dynamics of taxonomic and trait structure in North Sea fish communities. We found that the majority of variation in both taxonomic and trait structure was explained by a pronounced spatial gradient, with distinct communities in the southern and northern North Sea related to depth, sea surface temperature, salinity and bed shear stress. Both taxonomic and trait structure changed significantly over time; however taxonomically, communities in the south and north diverged towards different species, becoming more dissimilar over time, yet they converged towards the same traits regardless of species differences. In particular, communities shifted towards smaller, faster growing species with higher thermal preferences and pelagic water column position. Although taxonomic structure changed over time, its spatial distribution remained relatively stable, whereas in trait structure, the southern zone of the North Sea shifted northward and expanded, leading to homogenization. Our findings suggest that global environmental change, notably climate warming, will lead to convergence towards traits more adapted for novel environments regardless of species composition.
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Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000482780600001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2639
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Auteur McLean, M.; Auber, A.; Graham, N.A.J.; Houk, P.; Villeger, S.; Violle, C.; Thuiller, W.; Wilson, S.K.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Trait structure and redundancy determine sensitivity to disturbance in marine fish communities Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Glob. Change Biol.
Volume 25 Numéro 10 Pages 3424-3437
Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate change; climate-change; coral reefs; coral-reef fish; diversity stability; ecological traits; ecosystem functioning; ecosystem productivity; egg buoyancy; English Channel; functional diversity; functional redundancy; north-sea; regime shifts; response diversity; vulnerability
Résumé Trait diversity is believed to influence ecosystem dynamics through links between organismal traits and ecosystem processes. Theory predicts that key traits and high trait redundancy-large species richness and abundance supporting the same traits-can buffer communities against environmental disturbances. While experiments and data from simple ecological systems lend support, large-scale evidence from diverse, natural systems under major disturbance is lacking. Here, using long-term data from both temperate (English Channel) and tropical (Seychelles Islands) fishes, we show that sensitivity to disturbance depends on communities' initial trait structure and initial trait redundancy. In both ecosystems, we found that increasing dominance by climatically vulnerable traits (e.g., small, fast-growing pelagics/corallivores) rendered fish communities more sensitive to environmental change, while communities with higher trait redundancy were more resistant. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the influence of trait structure and redundancy on community sensitivity over large temporal and spatial scales in natural systems. Our results exemplify a consistent link between biological structure and community sensitivity that may be transferable across ecosystems and taxa and could help anticipate future disturbance impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000486150200018 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2652
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