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Auteur (up) Arones, K.; Grados, D.; Ayon, P.; Bertrand, A.
Titre Spatio-temporal trends in zooplankton biomass in the northern Humboldt current system off Peru from 1961-2012 Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 169 Numéro Pages Unsp-104656
Mots-Clés anchovy engraulis-ringens; chile; current ecosystem; Decadal trends; diet; Macrozooplankton; Mesozooplankton; Regime-shift; sardine; Secondary production; Spatiotemporal distribution; volume; zone
Résumé Anchovy (Engraulis ringens) is the most important exploited fish species in the Northern Humboldt Current System (NHCS) off Peru. This species, as well as most other pelagic resources, mainly forage on zooplankton. The NHCS is bottom-up controlled at a variety of scales. Therefore, fish biomass is driven by the abundance of their prey. In this context, we studied the spatiotemporal patterns of zooplankton biomass in the NHCS from 1961-2012. Data were collected with Hensen net all along the Peruvian coast. To transform zooplankton biovolume into biomass we used a regression that was calibrated from 145 zooplankton samples collected during four surveys and, for which, precise information was available on both biovolume and wet weight. The regression model was then applied on a time-series encompassing 158 cruises performed by the Peruvian Institute of the Sea (IMARPE) between 1961 and 2012. We observed a clear multidecadal pattern and two regime shifts, in 1973 and 1992. Maximum biomass occurred between 1961 and 1973 (61.5 g m(-2)). The lowest biomass (17.8 g m(-2)) occurred between 1974 and 1992. Finally, the biomass increased after 1993 (26.6 g m(-2)) but without reaching the levels observed before 1973. A seasonal pattern was observed with significantly more biomass in spring than in other seasons. Spatially, zooplankton biomass was higher offshore and in northern and southern Peru. Interestingly, the zooplankton sampling was performed using classic zooplankton net that are well fitted to mesozooplankton and are known to underestimate the macrozooplankton; however, the spatiotemporal patterns we observed are consistent with those of macrozooplankton, in particular euphausiids. This suggests that in the NHCS, when and where macrozooplankton dominates it also dominates the biomass obtained using classic zooplankton net samples. Finally, until now, in the NHCS only time-series on zooplankton biovolume were available. The biomass data we provide are more directly usable in trophic or end-to-end models.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000504782200009 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2693
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Auteur (up) Bertrand, A.; Habasque, J.; Hattab, T.; Hintzen, N.T.; Oliveros-Ramos, R.; Gutierrez, M.; Demarcq, H.; Gerlotto, F.
Titre 3-D habitat suitability of jack mackerel Trachurus murphyi in the Southeastern Pacific, a comprehensive study Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.
Volume 146 Numéro Pages 199-211
Mots-Clés anchovy; carangidae; chile; distribution models; distributions; dynamics; Ecology; ecosystem; peru; population-structure
Résumé South Pacific jack mackerel, Trachurus murphyi, has an ocean-scale distribution, from the South American coastline to New Zealand and Tasmania. This fish, captured by Humans since the Holocene, is nowadays heavily exploited and its population has decreased substantially since the mid-1990s. The uncertainty associated to jack mackerel population structure currently hampers management. Several hypotheses have been proposed from a single population up to several discrete populations. Still no.definitive answer was given. Determining how environmental conditions drive jack mackerel distribution can provide insights on its population structure. To do so, here we performed in three steps. First, we used satellite data to develop a statistical model of jack mackerel horizontal habitat suitability. Model predictions based on interaction between temperature and chlorophyll-a match the observed jack mackerel distribution, even during extreme El Nino event. Second, we studied the impact of oxygen and show that jack mackerel distribution and abundance is correlated to oxygen over a wide variety of scales and avoid low oxygen areas and periods. Third, on the basis of the above we built a conceptual 3D model of jack mackerel habitat in the Southeastern Pacific. We reveal the presence of a low suitable habitat along the Chilean and Peruvian coast, figuratively presenting a closed door caused by a gap in the horizontal habitat at 19-22 S and a shallow oxycline off south-centre Peru. This kind of situation likely occurs on a seasonal basis, in austral summer but also at longer temporal scales. A lack of exchanges at some periods/seasons partially isolate jack mackerel distributed off Peru. On the other hand the continuity in the habitat during most of the year explains why exchanges occur. We conclude that the more likely population structure for jack mackerel is a pelagic metapopulation. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1639
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Auteur (up) Garavelli, L.; Colas, F.; Verley, P.; Kaplan, D.M.; Yannicelli, B.; Lett, C.
Titre Influence of Biological Factors on Connectivity Patterns for Concholepas concholepas (loco) in Chile Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Plos One
Volume 11 Numéro 1 Pages e0146418
Mots-Clés Biological transport; Biophysics; Chile (country); Death rates; Fecundity; Hydrodynamics; Larvae; Marine biology
Résumé In marine benthic ecosystems, larval connectivity is a major process influencing the maintenance and distribution of invertebrate populations. Larval connectivity is a complex process to study as it is determined by several interacting factors. Here we use an individual-based, biophysical model, to disentangle the effects of such factors, namely larval vertical migration, larval growth, larval mortality, adults fecundity, and habitat availability, for the marine gastropod Concholepas concholepas (loco) in Chile. Lower transport success and higher dispersal distances are observed including larval vertical migration in the model. We find an overall decrease in larval transport success to settlement areas from northern to southern Chile. This spatial gradient results from the combination of current direction and intensity, seawater temperature, and available habitat. From our simulated connectivity patterns we then identify subpopulations of loco along the Chilean coast, which could serve as a basis for spatial management of this resource in the future.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1534
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Auteur (up) Shannon, L.J.; Coll, M.; Yemane, D.; Jouffre, D.; Neira, S.; Bertrand, A.; Diaz, E.; Shin, Y.J.
Titre Comparing data-based indicators across upwelling and comparable systems for communicating ecosystem states and trends Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.
Volume 67 Numéro 4 Pages 807-832
Mots-Clés adriatic sea; central chile; comparative approach; demersal resources; fishing impacts; food-web; global fisheries; humboldt current system; indicator; nw mediterranean sea; pelagic fish; regime shifts; southern benguela; upwelling
Résumé Shannon, L. J., Coll, M., Yemane, D., Jouffre, D., Neira, S., Bertrand, A., Diaz, E., and Shin, Y-J. 2010. Comparing data-based indicators across upwelling and comparable systems for communicating ecosystem states and trends. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 67: 807-832.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 482
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Auteur (up) Soissons, L.M.; da Conceicao, T.G.; Bastiaan, J.; van Dalen, J.; Ysebaert, T.; Herman, P.M.J.; Cozzoli, F.; Bouma, T.J.
Titre Sandification vs. muddification of tidal flats by benthic organisms: A flume study Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume 228 Numéro Pages Unsp-106355
Mots-Clés arenicola-marina; Benthic organisms; cerastoderma-edule bioturbation; Cerastorderma edule; community structure; erosion; impact; intertidal flat; lanice-conchilega; model; Ruditapes philippinarum; sediment erodability; Sediment properties; Silt content; Suspended sediment concentration; Tidal flats; wadden sea
Résumé Bioturbating benthic organisms have typically been characterised by how they modify the vertical sediment erosion thresholds. By means of several annular flume experiments, we aimed to understand how benthic organisms may affect grain-size sediment properties over time, and how this depends on the sediment type and the sediment loading of the water column. We compared the effect of two bioturbating macroinvertebrate species: a local dominant species, the cockle Cerastoderma edule and a spreading non-indigeneous species, the clam Ruditapes philippinarum. Our results indicate that the effect of benthic organisms on sediment dynamics is strongly dependent on both the prevailing environmental conditions and the benthic species present. If sediment is sandy, the benthos can gradually enhance the silt content of the sediment by mixing in part of the daily tidal sediment deposition. In contrast, if sediment is muddy, benthos can gradually decrease the silt content of the sediment by specifically suspending the fine fraction. Moreover, we observed that the native cockles had a stronger impact than invasive clams. Therefore, bioturbating benthos can have an important effect in determining the local sediment properties, with the outcome depending both on the species in question and the environmental conditions the bioturbator lives in. Our findings show that sediment bioturbation may have strong implications for tidal flat stability undergoing major changes from natural or anthropogenic sources.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000496611500001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2662
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