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Auteur Escalas, A.; Hale, L.; Voordeckers, J.W.; Yang, Y.; Firestone, M.K.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.; Zhou, J.
Titre Microbial functional diversity: From concepts to applications Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.
Volume 9 Numéro 20 Pages 12000-12016
Mots-Clés bacterial communities; biodiversity; biogeography; differentiation; functional diversity; functional traits; genes; microbial communities; niche space; redundancy; soil; taxonomy; theoretical frameworks of diversity; trait-based ecology; traits
Résumé Functional diversity is increasingly recognized by microbial ecologists as the essential link between biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning, determining the trophic relationships and interactions between microorganisms, their participation in biogeochemical cycles, and their responses to environmental changes. Consequently, its definition and quantification have practical and theoretical implications. In this opinion paper, we present a synthesis on the concept of microbial functional diversity from its definition to its application. Initially, we revisit to the original definition of functional diversity, highlighting two fundamental aspects, the ecological unit under study and the functional traits used to characterize it. Then, we discuss how the particularities of the microbial world disallow the direct application of the concepts and tools developed for macroorganisms. Next, we provide a synthesis of the literature on the types of ecological units and functional traits available in microbial functional ecology. We also provide a list of more than 400 traits covering a wide array of environmentally relevant functions. Lastly, we provide examples of the use of functional diversity in microbial systems based on the different units and traits discussed herein. It is our hope that this paper will stimulate discussions and help the growing field of microbial functional ecology to realize a potential that thus far has only been attained in macrobial ecology.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000488395500001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2649
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Auteur Oberdorff, T.; Dias, M.S.; Jezequel, C.; Albert, J.S.; Arantes, C.C.; Bigorne, R.; Carvajal-Valleros, F.M.; De Wever, A.; Frederico, R.G.; Hidalgo, M.; Hugueny, B.; Leprieur, F.; Maldonado, M.; Maldonado-Ocampo, J.; Martens, K.; Ortega, H.; Sarmiento, J.; Tedesco, P.A.; Torrente-Vilara, G.; Winemiller, K.O.; Zuanon, J.
Titre Unexpected fish diversity gradients in the Amazon basin Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Adv.
Volume 5 Numéro 9 Pages eaav8681
Mots-Clés biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change; communities; convergence; diversification; fragmentation; patterns; river; speciation
Résumé Using the most comprehensive fish occurrence database, we evaluated the importance of ecological and historical drivers in diversity patterns of subdrainage basins across the Amazon system. Linear models reveal the influence of climatic conditions, habitat size and sub-basin isolation on species diversity. Unexpectedly, the species richness model also highlighted a negative upriver-downriver gradient, contrary to predictions of increasing richness at more downriver locations along fluvial gradients. This reverse gradient may be linked to the history of the Amazon drainage network, which, after isolation as western and eastern basins throughout the Miocene, only began flowing eastward 1-9 million years (Ma) ago. Our results suggest that the main center of fish diversity was located westward, with fish dispersal progressing eastward after the basins were united and the Amazon River assumed its modern course toward the Atlantic. This dispersal process seems not yet achieved, suggesting a recent formation of the current Amazon system.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000491128800037 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2681
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Auteur Saeedi, H.; Reimer, J.D.; Brandt, M.; Dumais, P.-O.; Jazdzewska, A.M.; Jeffery, N.W.; Thielen, P.M.; Costello, M.J.
Titre Global marine biodiversity in the context of achieving the Aichi Targets: ways forward and addressing data gaps Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ
Volume 7 Numéro Pages e7221
Mots-Clés Aichi targets; assemblages; benefits; Biodiversity tools and pipelines; Biogeography; conservation; coral-reefs; Data standard; Data standards; deep-sea; Discovery; Dissemination; diversity gradient; life; Marine biodiversity; patterns; Prediction; progress; species richness; Stewardship; Stewardship and dissemination; Tools and pipelines
Résumé In 2010, the Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity agreed on the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. As this plan approaches its end, we discussed whether marine biodiversity and prediction studies were nearing the Aichi Targets during the 4th World Conference on Marine Biodiversity held in Montreal, Canada in June 2018. This article summarises the outcome of a five-day group discussion on how global marine biodiversity studies should be focused further to better understand the patterns of biodiversity. We discussed and reviewed seven fundamental biodiversity priorities related to nine Aichi Targets focusing on global biodiversity discovery and predictions to improve and enhance biodiversity data standards (quantity and quality), tools and techniques, spatial and temporal scale framing, and stewardship and dissemination. We discuss how identifying biodiversity knowledge gaps and promoting efforts have and will reduce such gaps, including via the use of new databases, tools and technology, and how these resources could be improved in the future. The group recognised significant progress toward Target 19 in relation to scientific knowledge, but negligible progress with regard to Targets 6 to 13 which aimed to safeguard and reduce human impacts on biodiversity.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000493041100001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2682
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Auteur Barneche, D.R.; Rezende, E.L.; Parravicini, V.; Maire, Eva; Edgar, G.J.; Stuart-Smith, R.D.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Ferreira, C.E.L.; Friedlander, A.M.; Green, A.L.; Luiz, O.J.; Rodriguez-Zaragoza, F.A.; Vigliola, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Floeter, S.R.
Titre Body size, reef area and temperature predict global reef-fish species richness across spatial scales Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 28 Numéro 3 Pages 315-327
Mots-Clés biodiversity; diversity; patterns; coral-reefs; spatial scale; community assembly; biogeography; extrapolation; local diversity; neutral theory; range size; rarefaction; regional diversity; species energy
Résumé Aim To investigate biotic and abiotic correlates of reef-fish species richness across multiple spatial scales. Location Tropical reefs around the globe, including 485 sites in 109 sub-provinces spread across 14 biogeographic provinces. Time period Present. Major taxa studied 2,523 species of reef fish. Methods We compiled a database encompassing 13,050 visual transects. We used hierarchical linear Bayesian models to investigate whether fish body size, reef area, isolation, temperature, and anthropogenic impacts correlate with reef-fish species richness at each spatial scale (i.e., sites, sub-provinces, provinces). Richness was estimated using coverage-based rarefaction. We also tested whether species packing (i.e., transect-level species richness/m(2)) is correlated with province-level richness. Results Body size had the strongest effect on species richness across all three spatial scales. Reef area and temperature were both positively correlated with richness at all spatial scales. At the site scale only, richness decreased with reef isolation. Species richness was not correlated with proxies of human impacts. Species packing was correlated with species richness at the province level following a sub-linear power function. Province-level differences in species richness were also mirrored by patterns of body size distribution at the site scale. Species-rich provinces exhibited heterogeneous assemblages of small-bodied species with small range sizes, whereas species-poor provinces encompassed homogeneous assemblages composed by larger species with greater dispersal capacity. Main conclusions Our findings suggest that body size distribution, reef area and temperature are major predictors of species richness and accumulation across scales, consistent with recent theories linking home range to species-area relationships as well as metabolic effects on speciation rates. Based on our results, we hypothesize that in less diverse areas, species are larger and likely more dispersive, leading to larger range sizes and less turnover between sites. Our results indicate that changes in province-level (i.e., regional) richness should leave a tractable fingerprint in local assemblages, and that detailed studies on local-scale assemblage composition may be informative of responses occurring at larger scales.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2522
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Auteur Benedetti, F.; Vogt, M.; Righetti, D.; Guilhaumon, F.; Ayata, S.-D.
Titre Do functional groups of planktonic copepods differ in their ecological niches? Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 45 Numéro 3 Pages 604-616
Mots-Clés climate-change; copepods; species distribution models; north-atlantic; calanus-finmarchicus; mediterranean sea; environmental niche; functional groups; lipid pump; marine ecosystem; oithona-similis; pseudo-absences; trait biogeography; zooplankton; zooplankton fecal pellets
Résumé Aim: To assess the degree of overlap between the environmental niches of marine planktonic copepods and test if the distribution of copepod functional groups differs across environmental gradients. Location: The Mediterranean Sea. Methods: Functional groups were defined based on clustering of functional traits in 106 marine copepod species using a multivariate ordination analysis. Functional traits included maximum body length, feeding mode, spawning strategy and trophic group. Simultaneously, the global distribution of the species was used to model their environmental niches with six environmental variables. For each of these predictors, four niche parameters were derived from the univariate response curve of each species to summarise their environmental preferences and ordinate the species in niche space through a PCA. Finally, the differences in the position in niche space of functional groups were tested with variance analysis. Results: We identified seven copepod functional groups with different distributions along the environmental gradients covered by our study. While carnivorous functional groups were affiliated with oligotrophic and tropical conditions, large and small current-feeding herbivores are associated with colder, more seasonally varying and productive conditions. Small cruising detritivores and other small current-feeding herbivores were not affiliated with specific conditions as their constituting species were scattered in niche space. Main conclusions: Since copepod functional groups occupy distinct ecological niches, ecosystem processes related to these groups are expected to vary across environmental gradients. Conditions favouring large current-feeding herbivores should allow for enhanced fluxes of energy and nutrients through Mediterranean Sea ecosystems, while such fluxes should be weakened where large carnivores and small passive ambush-feeding copepods dominate. Our study supports the development of trait-based zooplankton functional groups in marine ecosystem models.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2311
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