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Auteur McLean, M.; Stuart-Smith, R.D.; Villeger, S.; Auber, A.; Edgar, G.J.; MacNeil, M.A.; Loiseau, N.; Leprieur, F.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Trait similarity in reef fish faunas across the world's oceans Type Article scientifique
Année 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A.
Volume 118 Numéro 12 Pages e2012318118
Mots-Clés biogeography; community assembly; functional ecology; macroecology; phylogenetics
Résumé Species' traits, rather than taxonomic identities, determine community assembly and ecosystem functioning, yet biogeographic patterns have been far less studied for traits. While both environmental conditions and evolutionary history shape trait biogeography, their relative contributions are largely unknown for most organisms. Here, we explore the global biogeography of reef fish traits for 2,786 species from 89 ecoregions spanning eight marine realms with contrasting environmental conditions and evolutionary histories. Across realms, we found a common structure in the distribution of species traits despite a 10-fold gradient in species richness, with a defined “backbone” of 21 trait combinations shared by all realms globally, both temperate and tropical. Across ecoregions, assemblages under similar environmental conditions had similar trait compositions despite hosting drastically different species pools from separate evolutionary lineages. Thus, despite being separated by thousands of kilometers and millions of years of evolution, similar environments host similar trait compositions in reef fish assemblages worldwide. Our findings suggest that similar trait-based management strategies can be applied among regions with distinct species pools, potentially improving conservation outcomes across diverse jurisdictions.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000631868600009 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection (down) 3025
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Auteur Estivals, G.; Duponchelle, F.; Römer, U.; García‐Dávila, C.; Airola, E.; Deléglise, M.; Renno, J.-F.
Titre The Amazonian dwarf cichlid Apistogramma agassizii (Steindachner, 1875) is a geographic mosaic of potentially tens of species: Conservation implications Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems
Volume 30 Numéro 8 Pages 1521-1539
Mots-Clés biodiversity; biogeography; fish; fishing; floodplain; genetics; river
Résumé Assessing biodiversity and understanding how it works is a prerequisite for species conservation. The Amazon basin is one of the main biodiversity hotspots where fish are heavily exploited for ornamental purposes. The ornamental trade heavily exploits the genus Apistogramma, which is one of the most species-rich among Neotropical cichlids with 94 formally described species. This number is certainly underestimated owing to the limitations of conventional taxonomy, which is still too often based solely on morphological criteria and sometimes on few individuals. Most species of this genus have a high degree of endemism and are highly prized on the ornamental market, which could put them at risk. A few species are supposed to have extensive distributions, and in particular Apistogramma agassizii, present from the Amazon estuary up to the Ucayali and Marañon rivers in Peru. This study assessed the taxonomic status of 1,151 specimens of A. agassizii collected from 35 sites around Iquitos in the Peruvian Amazon. On the basis of molecular analyses (nuclear and mitochondrial DNA) and mate choice experiments, at least three biological species within the nominal A. agassizii were evidenced in the sampling area, which is extremely small compared with the known distribution of the species as initially described. According to the molecular calibrations, these three species would have diverged during the Plio-Pleistocene. Two of them seem to be endemic from small sub-basins, one from the Nanay River and the other from the Apayacu/Ampiyacu systems. A possible scenario that may explain the evolutionary history of these species is proposed. The conservation implications of these results on the estimation of the diversity of A. agassizii, of Apistogramma species in general, and of other Amazonian cichlids are discussed.
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Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1099-0755 ISBN Médium
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Auteur Sala, E.; Mayorga, J.; Bradley, D.; Cabral, R.B.; Atwood, T.B.; Auber, A.; Cheung, W.; Costello, C.; Ferretti, F.; Friedlander, A.M.; Gaines, S.D.; Garilao, C.; Goodell, W.; Halpern, B.S.; Hinson, A.; Kaschner, K.; Kesner-Reyes, K.; Leprieur, F.; McGowan, J.; Morgan, L.E.; Mouillot, D.; Palacios-Abrantes, J.; Possingham, H.P.; Rechberger, K.D.; Worm, B.; Lubchenco, J.
Titre Protecting the global ocean for biodiversity, food and climate Type Article scientifique
Année 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Nature
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés areas; biogeography; costs; impact; model; organic-matter; predictors; resuspension; sediments; take marine reserves
Résumé The ocean contains unique biodiversity, provides valuable food resources and is a major sink for anthropogenic carbon. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an effective tool for restoring ocean biodiversity and ecosystem services(1,2), but at present only 2.7% of the ocean is highly protected(3). This low level of ocean protection is due largely to conflicts with fisheries and other extractive uses. To address this issue, here we developed a conservation planning framework to prioritize highly protected MPAs in places that would result in multiple benefits today and in the future. We find that a substantial increase in ocean protection could have triple benefits, by protecting biodiversity, boosting the yield of fisheries and securing marine carbon stocks that are at risk from human activities. Our results show that most coastal nations contain priority areas that can contribute substantially to achieving these three objectives of biodiversity protection, food provision and carbon storage. A globally coordinated effort could be nearly twice as efficient as uncoordinated, national-level conservation planning. Our flexible prioritization framework could help to inform both national marine spatial plans(4) and global targets for marine conservation, food security and climate action.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000629906100007 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection (down) 3007
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Auteur Reygondeau, G.; Cheung, W.W.L.; Wabnitz, C.C.C.; Lam, V.W.Y.; Frölicher, T.; Maury, O.
Titre Climate Change-Induced Emergence of Novel Biogeochemical Provinces Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés Biogeochemical provinces; Marine Biogeography; Novel habitat; Pelagic environment; Species distribution (niche) model
Résumé The global ocean is commonly partitioned into 4 biomes subdivided into 56 biogeochemical provinces (BGCPs) following the accepted partition proposed by Longhurst in 1998. Each province corresponds to a unique regional environment that shapes biodiversity and constrains ecosystem structure and functions. BGCPs are dynamic entities that change their spatial extent and position with climate and are expected to be pertubated in the near future by global climate change. Here, we characterize the changes in spatial distribution of BGCPs from 1950 to 2100 using three earth system models under two representative concentration pathways (RCP 2.6 and 8.5). We project a reorganisation of current distribution of BGCPs driven mostly by a poleward shift of their distributions (18.4 km in average per decade). Projection of the future distribution of BGCPs also revealed the emergence of new climate that has no analogue with past and current environmental conditions experienced by BGCPs . This novel environmental conditions, here named No-Analogue BGCPs State (NABS), will expand from 2040 to 2100 at a rate of 4.3 Mkm2 per decade (1.2% of the global ocean). We subsequently quantified the potential amount of marine species and fisheries catch that would experience such novel environmental conditions to roughly evaluate NABS impact on ecosystem services.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection (down) 2980
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Auteur Du, X.; Deng, Y.; Li, S.; Escalas, A.; Feng, K.; He, Q.; Wang, Z.; Wu, Y.; Wang, D.; Peng, X.; Wang, S.
Titre Steeper spatial scaling patterns of subsoil microbiota are shaped by deterministic assembly process Type Article scientifique
Année 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.
Volume 30 Numéro 4 Pages 1072-1085
Mots-Clés archaeal communities; assembly mechanism; beta-diversity; biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change; depth; distance decay; drivers; grassland; prokaryote; sequences; soil bacterial communities; spatial scaling; species-area relationship
Résumé Although many studies have investigated the spatial scaling of microbial communities living in surface soils, very little is known about the patterns within deeper strata, nor is the mechanism behind them. Here, we systematically assessed spatial scaling of prokaryotic biodiversity within three different strata (Upper: 0-20 cm, Middle: 20-40 cm, and Substratum: 40-100 cm) in a typical grassland by examining both distance-decay (DDRs) and species-area relationships (SARs), taxonomically and phylogenetically, as well as community assembly processes. Each layer exhibited significant biogeographic patterns in both DDR and SAR (p < .05), with taxonomic turnover rates higher than phylogenetic ones. Specifically, the spatial turnover rates, beta and z values, respectively, ranged from 0.016 +/- 0.005 to 0.023 +/- 0.005 and 0.065 +/- 0.002 to 0.077 +/- 0.004 across soil strata, and both increased with depth. Moreover, the prokaryotic community in grassland soils assembled mainly according to deterministic rather than stochastic mechanisms. By using normalized stochasticity ratio (NST) based on null model, the relative importance of deterministic ratios increased from 48.0 to 63.3% from Upper to Substratum, meanwhile a phylogenetic based method revealed average beta NTI also increased with depth, from -5.29 to 19.5. Using variation partitioning and distance approaches, both geographic distance and soil properties were found to strongly affect biodiversity structure, the proportions increasing with depth, but spatial distance was always the main underlying factor. These indicated increasingly deterministic proportions in accelerating turnover rates for spatial assembly of prokaryotic biodiversity. Our study provided new insights on biogeography in different strata, revealing importance of assembly patterns and mechanisms of prokaryote communities in below-surface soils.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000601909000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection (down) 2963
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