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Auteur Puerta, P.; Johnson, C.; Carreiro-Silva, M.; Henry, L.-A.; Kenchington, E.; Morato, T.; Kazanidis, G.; Luis Rueda, J.; Urra, J.; Ross, S.; Wei, C.-L.; Manuel Gonzalez-Irusta, J.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Orejas, C.
Titre Influence of Water Masses on the Biodiversity and Biogeography of Deep-Sea Benthic Ecosystems in the North Atlantic Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages 239
Mots-Clés antarctic intermediate water; biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change impacts; coral lophelia-pertusa; deep-sea; food-supply mechanisms; global habitat suitability; meridional overturning circulation; ne atlantic; North Atlantic; ocean acidification; porcupine seabight; rockall trough margin; vulnerable marine ecosystems; water masses
Résumé Circulation patterns in the North Atlantic Ocean have changed and re-organized multiple times over millions of years, influencing the biodiversity, distribution, and connectivity patterns of deep-sea species and ecosystems. In this study, we review the effects of the water mass properties (temperature, salinity, food supply, carbonate chemistry, and oxygen) on deep-sea benthic megafauna (from species to community level) and discussed in future scenarios of climate change. We focus on the key oceanic controls on deep-sea megafauna biodiversity and biogeography patterns. We place particular attention on cold-water corals and sponges, as these are ecosystem-engineering organisms that constitute vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME) with high associated biodiversity. Besides documenting the current state of the knowledge on this topic, a future scenario for water mass properties in the deep North Atlantic basin was predicted. The pace and severity of climate change in the deep-sea will vary across regions. However, predicted water mass properties showed that all regions in the North Atlantic will be exposed to multiple stressors by 2100, experiencing at least one critical change in water temperature (+2 degrees C), organic carbon fluxes (reduced up to 50%), ocean acidification (pH reduced up to 0.3), aragonite saturation horizon (shoaling above 1000 m) and/or reduction in dissolved oxygen (> 5%). The northernmost regions of the North Atlantic will suffer the greatest impacts. Warmer and more acidic oceans will drastically reduce the suitable habitat for ecosystem-engineers, with severe consequences such as declines in population densities, even compromising their long-term survival, loss of biodiversity and reduced biogeographic distribution that might compromise connectivity at large scales. These effects can be aggravated by reductions in carbon fluxes, particularly in areas where food availability is already limited. Declines in benthic biomass and biodiversity will diminish ecosystem services such as habitat provision, nutrient cycling, etc. This study shows that the deep-sea VME affected by contemporary anthropogenic impacts and with the ongoing climate change impacts are unlikely to withstand additional pressures from more intrusive human activities. This study serves also as a warning to protect these ecosystems through regulations and by tempering the ongoing socio-political drivers for increasing exploitation of marine resources.
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Auteur Kadarusman; Sugeha, H.Y.; Pouyaud, L.; Hocdé, R.; Hismayasari, I.B.; Gunaisah, E.; Widiarto, S.B.; Arafat, G.; Widyasari, F.; Mouillot, D.; Paradis, E.
Titre A thirteen-million-year divergence between two lineages of Indonesian coelacanths Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep
Volume 10 Numéro 1 Pages 192
Mots-Clés biogeography; halmahera; latimeria-chalumnae; living fossils; mindanao; multiple sequence alignment; phylogenies; population; speciation; tectonic evolution
Résumé Coelacanth fishes of the genus Latimeria are the only surviving representatives of a basal lineage of vertebrates that originated more than 400 million years ago. Yet, much remains to be unveiled about the diversity and evolutionary history of these 'living fossils' using new molecular data, including the possibility of 'cryptic' species or unknown lineages. Here, we report the discovery of a new specimen in eastern Indonesia allegedly belonging to the species L. menadoensis. Although this specimen was found about 750km from the known geographical distribution of the species, we found that the molecular divergence between this specimen and others of L. menadoensis was great: 1.8% compared to 0.04% among individuals of L. chalumnae, the other living species of coelacanth. Molecular dating analyses suggested a divergence date of ca. 13 million years ago between the two populations of Indonesian coelacanths. We elaborate a biogeographical scenario to explain the observed genetic divergence of Indonesian coelacanth populations based on oceanic currents and the tectonic history of the region over Miocene to recent. We hypothesize that several populations of coelacanths are likely to live further east of the present capture location, with potentially a new species that remains to be described. Based on this, we call for an international effort to take appropriate measures to protect these fascinating but vulnerable vertebrates which represent among the longest branches on the Tree of Life.
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000511157800002 Approuvé pas de
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Auteur Saeedi, H.; Reimer, J.D.; Brandt, M.; Dumais, P.-O.; Jazdzewska, A.M.; Jeffery, N.W.; Thielen, P.M.; Costello, M.J.
Titre Global marine biodiversity in the context of achieving the Aichi Targets: ways forward and addressing data gaps Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ
Volume 7 Numéro Pages e7221
Mots-Clés Aichi targets; assemblages; benefits; Biodiversity tools and pipelines; Biogeography; conservation; coral-reefs; Data standard; Data standards; deep-sea; Discovery; Dissemination; diversity gradient; life; Marine biodiversity; patterns; Prediction; progress; species richness; Stewardship; Stewardship and dissemination; Tools and pipelines
Résumé In 2010, the Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity agreed on the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. As this plan approaches its end, we discussed whether marine biodiversity and prediction studies were nearing the Aichi Targets during the 4th World Conference on Marine Biodiversity held in Montreal, Canada in June 2018. This article summarises the outcome of a five-day group discussion on how global marine biodiversity studies should be focused further to better understand the patterns of biodiversity. We discussed and reviewed seven fundamental biodiversity priorities related to nine Aichi Targets focusing on global biodiversity discovery and predictions to improve and enhance biodiversity data standards (quantity and quality), tools and techniques, spatial and temporal scale framing, and stewardship and dissemination. We discuss how identifying biodiversity knowledge gaps and promoting efforts have and will reduce such gaps, including via the use of new databases, tools and technology, and how these resources could be improved in the future. The group recognised significant progress toward Target 19 in relation to scientific knowledge, but negligible progress with regard to Targets 6 to 13 which aimed to safeguard and reduce human impacts on biodiversity.
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ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium
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Auteur Oberdorff, T.; Dias, M.S.; Jezequel, C.; Albert, J.S.; Arantes, C.C.; Bigorne, R.; Carvajal-Valleros, F.M.; De Wever, A.; Frederico, R.G.; Hidalgo, M.; Hugueny, B.; Leprieur, F.; Maldonado, M.; Maldonado-Ocampo, J.; Martens, K.; Ortega, H.; Sarmiento, J.; Tedesco, P.A.; Torrente-Vilara, G.; Winemiller, K.O.; Zuanon, J.
Titre Unexpected fish diversity gradients in the Amazon basin Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Adv.
Volume 5 Numéro 9 Pages eaav8681
Mots-Clés biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change; communities; convergence; diversification; fragmentation; patterns; river; speciation
Résumé Using the most comprehensive fish occurrence database, we evaluated the importance of ecological and historical drivers in diversity patterns of subdrainage basins across the Amazon system. Linear models reveal the influence of climatic conditions, habitat size and sub-basin isolation on species diversity. Unexpectedly, the species richness model also highlighted a negative upriver-downriver gradient, contrary to predictions of increasing richness at more downriver locations along fluvial gradients. This reverse gradient may be linked to the history of the Amazon drainage network, which, after isolation as western and eastern basins throughout the Miocene, only began flowing eastward 1-9 million years (Ma) ago. Our results suggest that the main center of fish diversity was located westward, with fish dispersal progressing eastward after the basins were united and the Amazon River assumed its modern course toward the Atlantic. This dispersal process seems not yet achieved, suggesting a recent formation of the current Amazon system.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000491128800037 Approuvé pas de
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Auteur Escalas, A.; Hale, L.; Voordeckers, J.W.; Yang, Y.; Firestone, M.K.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.; Zhou, J.
Titre Microbial functional diversity: From concepts to applications Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Evol.
Volume 9 Numéro 20 Pages 12000-12016
Mots-Clés bacterial communities; biodiversity; biogeography; differentiation; functional diversity; functional traits; genes; microbial communities; niche space; redundancy; soil; taxonomy; theoretical frameworks of diversity; trait-based ecology; traits
Résumé Functional diversity is increasingly recognized by microbial ecologists as the essential link between biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning, determining the trophic relationships and interactions between microorganisms, their participation in biogeochemical cycles, and their responses to environmental changes. Consequently, its definition and quantification have practical and theoretical implications. In this opinion paper, we present a synthesis on the concept of microbial functional diversity from its definition to its application. Initially, we revisit to the original definition of functional diversity, highlighting two fundamental aspects, the ecological unit under study and the functional traits used to characterize it. Then, we discuss how the particularities of the microbial world disallow the direct application of the concepts and tools developed for macroorganisms. Next, we provide a synthesis of the literature on the types of ecological units and functional traits available in microbial functional ecology. We also provide a list of more than 400 traits covering a wide array of environmentally relevant functions. Lastly, we provide examples of the use of functional diversity in microbial systems based on the different units and traits discussed herein. It is our hope that this paper will stimulate discussions and help the growing field of microbial functional ecology to realize a potential that thus far has only been attained in macrobial ecology.
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ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000488395500001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection (down) 2649
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