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Auteur Lezama-Ochoa, A.; Grados, D.; Lebourges Dhaussy, A.; Irigoien, X.; Chaigneau, A.; Bertrand, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Biological characteristics of the hydrological landscapes in the Bay of Biscay in spring 2009 Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Fisheries Oceanography  
  Volume 24 Numéro 1 Pages 26-41  
  Mots-Clés acoustics; Bay of Biscay; Biogeography; fish; horizontal distribution; hydrological structures; macrozooplankton; patterns  
  Résumé In the present study we investigated the biogeography of macrozooplankton and fish biomass in the Bay of Biscay. In this region, we defined six different landscapes based on the hydrogeographical characteristics observed in spring 2009. We then related landscape's characteristics and environmental parameters such as light attenuation depth and chlorophyll-a with macrozooplankton and fish acoustic biomass. Hydrodynamic structures together with coastal influences (river discharges, predation pressure and depth preference) and vertical thermohaline structure/mixing (feeding modes and ability to stay in preferred layers) appeared as the main factors determining the biological distribution. Besides, variance partitioning was used to assess the respective roles played by the hydrological environment, the geographical space and the biological environment alone, and their interactions. Results revealed that: (i) macrozooplankton and fish have a preference for different hydrogeographical landscapes; (ii) the association between hydrological conditions and geographical features, i.e. the spatial structure of the hydrological environment, plays a key role in the distribution of macrozooplankton; and (iii) prey-predator relationships have to be taken into account to provide a comprehensive characterization of habitat suitability.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-6006 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1109  
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Auteur Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Bellwood, D.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Myers, R.; Vigliola, L.; D'Agata, S.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global patterns and predictors of tropical reef fish species richness Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 36 Numéro 12 Pages 1254-1262  
  Mots-Clés Biogeography; constraints; coral-reefs; dispersal; diversity; eastern; gradients; marine biodiversity; ocean; pacific; spatial autocorrelation  
  Résumé In the marine realm, the tropics host an extraordinary diversity of taxa but the drivers underlying the global distribution of marine organisms are still under scrutiny and we still lack an accurate global predictive model. Using a spatial database for 6336 tropical reef fishes, we attempted to predict species richness according to geometric, biogeographical and environmental explanatory variables. In particular, we aimed to evaluate and disentangle the predictive performances of temperature, habitat area, connectivity, mid-domain effect and biogeographical region on reef fish species richness. We used boosted regression trees, a flexible machine-learning technique, to build our predictive model and structural equation modeling to test for potential mediation effects' among predictors. Our model proved to be accurate, explaining 80% of the total deviance in fish richness using a cross-validated procedure. Coral reef area and biogeographical region were the primary predictors of reef fish species richness, followed by coast length, connectivity, mid-domain effect and sea surface temperature, with interactions between the region and other predictors. Important indirect effects of water temperature on reef fish richness, mediated by coral reef area, were also identified. The relationship between environmental predictors and species richness varied markedly among biogeographical regions. Our analysis revealed that a few easily accessible variables can accurately predict reef fish species richness. They also highlight concerns regarding ongoing environmental declines, with region-specific responses to variation in environmental conditions predicting a variable response to anthropogenic impacts.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 623  
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Auteur Mouillot, D.; De Bortoli, J.; Leprieur, F.; Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Bellwood, D.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre The challenge of delineating biogeographical regions: nestedness matters for Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography  
  Volume 40 Numéro 12 Pages 2228-2237  
  Mots-Clés -diversity; Archipelago; Coral Triangle; Indo-Australian; Pae; beta-diversity; biodiversity hotspots; conservation; delineation; dissimilarity; dung beetles; endemicity; evolutionary history; global; historical biogeography; nestedness; parsimony analysis; partitioning; patterns; reef fish assemblages; spatial-patterns; turnover  
  Résumé AimThe delineation of regions is a critical procedure in biogeography, but there is still no consensus about the best approach. Traditionally, a compositional dissimilarity index and a clustering algorithm are used to partition locations into regions. However, the choice of index and algorithm may have a profound impact on the final result, particularly when locations display different levels of species richness and when they are nested within each other. Our objective was to estimate the influence of species nestedness among locations on the delineation of biogeographical regions. LocationAs a case study, we used coral reef fishes (families Chaetodontidae, Pomacentridae and Labridae) from the Indo-Pacific, where a large richness gradient extends, often as a series of nested assemblages, from the species-rich Indo-Australian Archipelago (Coral Triangle) to species-poor peripheral locations. MethodsWe used the turnover and nestedness components of the SOrensen and Jaccard dissimilarity indices to estimate the effect of nestedness on the delineation of biogeographical regions. In addition, we compared the results with those obtained using a parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE). ResultsLow Mantel correlation values revealed that the PAE method assembled locations in a very different way than methods based on dissimilarity indices for Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes. We also found that nestedness mattered when delineating biogeographical units because, for both the SOrensen and the Jaccard indices, reef fish assemblages were grouped differently depending on whether we used the turnover component of each index or the complete index, including the nestedness component. The turnover component ignored variation in species richness attributable to differences in habitat area between locations, and permitted a delineation based solely on species replacement. Main conclusionsWe demonstrate that the choice of the component used to measure dissimilarity between species assemblages is critical, because it may strongly influence regional delineations, at least for Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes. We conclude that the two components of the dissimilarity indices can reveal complementary insights into the role that history may have played in shaping extant patterns of biodiversity.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 879  
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Auteur Toussaint, A.; Beauchard, O.; Oberdorff, T.; Brosse, S.; Villeger, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Worldwide freshwater fish homogenization is driven by a few widespread non-native species Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Biol. Invasions  
  Volume 18 Numéro 5 Pages 1295-1304  
  Mots-Clés australia; Beta-diversity; biogeography; biotic homogenization; dispersal; distinctiveness; diversity; Exotic species; faunas; Freshwater fish; iberian peninsula; Introduction; introductions; taxonomic dissimilarity; Translocation  
  Résumé Introduction of non-native species have changed the composition of freshwater fish assemblages throughout the world and hence the dissimilarity between them, either toward homogenization (i.e. decrease in dissimilarity) or differentiation (i.e. increase in dissimilarity). However, there is still no assessment of individual contributions of non-native species to this overall trend at the global scale. Here, we disentangle individual non-native species effect from the global effect of the whole introduced species pool at the biogeographic realm scale and test which determinant can explain the effect of non-native species on changes in assemblage dissimilarity. Our results show that the contribution of introduced species on changes in dissimilarity is highly variable and all directions of changes are observed through the introduction process, i.e. either toward homogenization, differentiation or no change. Overall, only a few widespread species contribute to the worldwide homogenization pattern, whereas most of introduced species slightly contribute to the global change in dissimilarity. The effect of species on change in dissimilarity was influenced by the introduction pressure but also by whether introduced species were translocated (i.e. introduced to other basins within their biogeographic realm) or exotic (i.e. introduced from other biogeographic realms). Homogenization is strongly determined by the species translocated within a realm and only by few widespread exotic species whereas the majority of exotics contribute to a differentiation effect. Nevertheless, under future intensified human pressure, the exotic species spread across realms is predicted to increase and their differentiation effect might turn towards homogenization, and might trigger the global homogenization trend.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1387-3547 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1654  
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Auteur Dias, M.S.; Oberdorff, T.; Hugueny, B.; Leprieur, F.; Jezequel, C.; Cornu, J.F.; Brosse, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Tedesco, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global imprint of historical connectivity on freshwater fish biodiversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters  
  Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 1130-1140  
  Mots-Clés Alpha diversity; Beta diversity; Biogeography; Quaternary climate changes; africa; climate changes; contemporary; diversity patterns; endemism; evolution; freshwater fish; global; history; north-america; richness; river systems; scale; sea-level changes; species turnover; species-richness  
  Résumé The relative importance of contemporary and historical processes is central for understanding biodiversity patterns. While several studies show that past conditions can partly explain the current biodiversity patterns, the role of history remains elusive. We reconstructed palaeo-drainage basins under lower sea level conditions (Last Glacial Maximum) to test whether the historical connectivity between basins left an imprint on the global patterns of freshwater fish biodiversity. After controlling for contemporary and past environmental conditions, we found that palaeo-connected basins displayed greater species richness but lower levels of endemism and beta diversity than did palaeo-disconnected basins. Palaeo-connected basins exhibited shallower distance decay of compositional similarity, suggesting that palaeo-river connections favoured the exchange of fish species. Finally, we found that a longer period of palaeo-connection resulted in lower levels of beta diversity. These findings reveal the first unambiguous results of the role played by history in explaining the global contemporary patterns of biodiversity.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 631  
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