|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur REYGONDEAU, G.; MAURY, O.; BEAUGRAND, G.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; FONTENEAU, A.; CURY, P.
Titre Biogeography of tuna and billfish communities Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Journal Of Biogeography Revue Abrégée (up)
Volume 39 Numéro 1 Pages 114-129
Mots-Clés Biogeochemical provinces; global ocean; Istiophorus; Katsuwonus; macroecology; Makaira; marine biogeography; Tetrapturus; Thunnus; Xiphias
Résumé Aim The aims of this study were: (1) to identify global communities of tuna and billfish species through quantitative statistical analyses of global fisheries data; (2) to describe the spatial distribution, main environmental drivers and species composition of each community detected; and (3) to determine whether the spatial distribution of each community could be linked to the environmental conditions that affect lower trophic levels by comparing the partitions identified in this study with Longhursts biogeochemical provinces. Location The global ocean from 60 degrees S to 65 degrees N. Methods We implemented a new numerical procedure based on a hierarchical clustering method and a nonparametric probabilistic test to divide the oceanic biosphere into biomes and ecoregions. This procedure was applied to a database that comprised standardized data on commercial longline catches for 15 different species of tuna and billfish over a period of more than 50 years (i.e. 1953-2007). For each ecoregion identified (i.e. characteristic tuna and billfish community), we analysed the relationships between species composition and environmental factors. Finally, we compared the biogeochemical provinces of Longhurst with the ecoregions that we identified. Results Tuna and billfish species form nine well-defined communities across the global ocean. Each community occurs in regions with specific environmental conditions and shows a distinctive species composition. High similarity (68.8% homogeneity) between the spatial distribution of the communities of tuna and billfish and the biogeochemical provinces suggests a strong relationship between these species and the physical and chemical characteristics of the global ocean. Main conclusions Despite their high tolerance for a wide range of environmental conditions, these highly migratory species are partitioned into clear geographical communities in the ocean at a global scale. The similarity between biogeochemical and biotic divisions in the ocean suggests that the global ocean is a mosaic of large biogeographical ecosystems, each characterized by specific environmental conditions that have a strong effect on the composition of the trophic web.
Adresse IFREMER, Ctr Rech Halieut Mediterraneennes & Trop, UMR EME 212, F-34203 Sete, France.
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Wiley-blackwell Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 17141 collection 1002
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Toussaint, A.; Beauchard, O.; Oberdorff, T.; Brosse, S.; Villeger, S.
Titre Worldwide freshwater fish homogenization is driven by a few widespread non-native species Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Invasions
Volume 18 Numéro 5 Pages 1295-1304
Mots-Clés australia; Beta-diversity; biogeography; biotic homogenization; dispersal; distinctiveness; diversity; Exotic species; faunas; Freshwater fish; iberian peninsula; Introduction; introductions; taxonomic dissimilarity; Translocation
Résumé Introduction of non-native species have changed the composition of freshwater fish assemblages throughout the world and hence the dissimilarity between them, either toward homogenization (i.e. decrease in dissimilarity) or differentiation (i.e. increase in dissimilarity). However, there is still no assessment of individual contributions of non-native species to this overall trend at the global scale. Here, we disentangle individual non-native species effect from the global effect of the whole introduced species pool at the biogeographic realm scale and test which determinant can explain the effect of non-native species on changes in assemblage dissimilarity. Our results show that the contribution of introduced species on changes in dissimilarity is highly variable and all directions of changes are observed through the introduction process, i.e. either toward homogenization, differentiation or no change. Overall, only a few widespread species contribute to the worldwide homogenization pattern, whereas most of introduced species slightly contribute to the global change in dissimilarity. The effect of species on change in dissimilarity was influenced by the introduction pressure but also by whether introduced species were translocated (i.e. introduced to other basins within their biogeographic realm) or exotic (i.e. introduced from other biogeographic realms). Homogenization is strongly determined by the species translocated within a realm and only by few widespread exotic species whereas the majority of exotics contribute to a differentiation effect. Nevertheless, under future intensified human pressure, the exotic species spread across realms is predicted to increase and their differentiation effect might turn towards homogenization, and might trigger the global homogenization trend.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1387-3547 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1654
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Pommier, T.; Douzery, E.J.P.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Environment drives high phylogenetic turnover among oceanic bacterial communities Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Lett.
Volume 8 Numéro 4 Pages 562-566
Mots-Clés Biogeography; connectivity; diversity; dynamics; patterns; phylogenetic turnover
Résumé Although environmental filtering has been observed to influence the biodiversity patterns of marine bacterial communities, it was restricted to the regional scale and to the species level, leaving the main drivers unknown at large biogeographic scales and higher taxonomic levels. Bacterial communities with different species compositions may nevertheless share phylogenetic lineages, and phylogenetic turnover (PT) among those communities may be surprisingly low along any biogeographic or environmental gradient. Here, we investigated the relative influence of environmental filtering and geographical distance on the PT between marine bacterial communities living more than 8000 km apart in contrasted abiotic conditions. PT was high between communities and was more structured by local environmental factors than by geographical distance, suggesting the predominance of a lineage filtering process. Strong phenotype-environment mismatches observed in the ocean may surpass high connectivity between marine microbial communities.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 567
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Evans, S.M.; McKenna, C.; Simpson, S.D.; Tournois, J.; Genner, M.J.
Titre Patterns of species range evolution in Indo-Pacific reef assemblages reveal the Coral Triangle as a net source of transoceanic diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Lett.
Volume 12 Numéro 6 Pages 20160090
Mots-Clés Bayesian skyline plot; biogeography; climate change; coral reef; fishes global patterns; marine biodiversity; ocean; phylogeography; refugia; species distributions
Résumé The Coral Triangle in the Indo-Pacific is a region renowned for exceptional marine biodiversity. The area could have acted as a 'centre of origin' where speciation has been prolific or a 'centre of survival' by providing refuge during major environmental shifts such as sea-level changes. The region could also have acted as a 'centre of accumulation' for species with origins outside of the Coral Triangle, owing to it being at a central position between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Here, we investigated support for these hypotheses using population-level DNA sequence-based reconstructions of the range evolution of 45 species (314 populations) of Indo-Pacific reef-associated organisms. Our results show that populations undergoing the most ancient establishment were significantly more likely to be closer to the centre of the Coral Triangle than to peripheral locations. The data are consistent with the Coral Triangle being a net source of coral-reef biodiversity for the Indo-Pacific region, suggesting that the region has acted primarily as a centre of survival, a centre of origin or both. These results provide evidence of how a key location can influence the large-scale distributions of biodiversity over evolutionary timescales.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1694
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Péron, C.; Gremillet, D.; Prudor, A.; Pettex, E.; Saraux, C.; Soriano-Redondo, A.; Authier, M.; Fort, J.
Titre Importance of coastal Marine Protected Areas for the conservation of pelagic seabirds: The case of Vulnerable yelkouan shearwaters in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biological Conservation
Volume 168 Numéro Pages 210-221
Mots-Clés Aerial surveys; At-sea observations; Biotelemetry; Conservation biogeography; Spatial planning; Stable isotope analysis
Résumé Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are being established across all marine regions but their validity for the conservation of highly mobile marine vertebrates has been questioned. We tested the hypothesis that French coastal MPAs primarily designed for coastal and benthic biota are also beneficial for the conservation of a pelagic seabird, the Vulnerable yelkouan shearwater (Puffinus yelkouan), an endemic species to the Mediterranean Sea. We used a vast spectrum of electronic devices (GPS, temperature-depth-recorders, satellite transmitters and geolocators) and stable isotopic analyses to study the year-round movements and the trophic status of yelkouan shearwaters from the Hyères archipelago (France). In addition we conducted large-scale ship and aircrafts observation surveys to investigate spatio-temporal density patterns of shearwaters (genus Puffinus) in the western Mediterranean Sea. This extensive investigation permitted the first comprehensive study of the at-sea ecology of yelkouan shearwaters showing strikingly coastal habits, partial migration, unsuspected diving capabilities (max dive depth of 30 m), and a broad diet ranging from zooplankton to small pelagic fish. Importantly, 31% of yelkouan shearwaters GPS positions associated with foraging, 38% of diving positions, and 27% of resting positions were within the three French MPAs during the breeding season. These high scores confirmed by year-round distribution derived from GLS, PTTs, at-sea and aerial observations, validated our hypothesis of the major importance of coastal MPAs for the conservation of yelkouan shearwater. Our case-study is therefore a major contribution to research efforts aiming at linking the spatial ecology of highly mobile marine vertebrates with effective conservation of marine biodiversity.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:<br/>Author Address: CEFE-CNRS, UMR5175, 1919 route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier, France<br/>Author Address: University of Cape Town, FitzPatrick Institute, DST-NRF Centre of Excellence , Rondebosch 7701, South Africa<br/>Author Address: Université de La Rochelle,CNRS,Observatoire PELAGIS, Systèmes d’Observation pour la Conservation des Mammifères et des Oiseaux Marins, UMS 3462, Pôle Analytique, 5 allées de l’Océan, 17000 La Rochelle, France<br/>Author Address: IFREMER, (Institut Français de Recherche pour l’Exploitation de la Mer) UMR 212 EME, Sète, France<br/>Author Address: Aarhus University, Department of Bioscience, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark<br/>PB – Elsevier<br/> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 285
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement