|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur Liess, A.; Faithfull, C.; Reichstein, B.; Rowe, O.; Guo, J.; Pete, R.; Thomsson, G.; Uszko, W.; Francoeur, S.N.
Titre Terrestrial runoff may reduce microbenthic net community productivity by increasing turbidity: a Mediterranean coastal lagoon mesocosm experiment Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia
Volume (down) 753 Numéro 1 Pages 205-218
Mots-Clés Bacteria; Dissolved organic carbon (DOC); Ecology; Enclosure experiment; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Microbenthos; Nutrient subsidy; Terrestrial subsidy; Zoology
Résumé
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0018-8158, 1573-5117 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1338
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Caro, A.; Escalas, A.; Bouvier, C.; Grousset, E.; Lautredou-Audouy, N.; Roques, C.; Charmantier, M.; Gros, O.
Titre Epibiotic bacterial community of Sphaeroma serratum (Crustacea, Isopoda): relationship with molt status Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Volume (down) 457 Numéro Pages 11-27
Mots-Clés 16s ribosomal-rna; Crustacean; DGGE band pattern; Epibiotic biofilm; Molt cycle; Sphaeroma; fish; gastropod; gradient gel-electrophoresis; hydrothermal-vent; in-situ hybridization; mid-atlantic ridge; oxidizing bacteria; phylogenetic diversity; riftia-pachyptila; shrimp rimicaris-exoculata; urothoe-poseidonis
Résumé Sphaeroma serratum is a marine isopod species that inhabits seashores from Europe to West Africa. The individuals live under stones in direct contact with reduced sediments and harbour a diverse bacterial community on the cuticle of their pleopods. We investigated the diversity of these epibiotic bacteria on male (pubescent and senescent) and female specimens with electron microscopic observations and molecular tools. The microbial community of S. serratum was shown to be composed of at least 5 bacterial morphotypes observed on the pleopodal cuticle in all male specimens. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we identified 5 major phylogenetic groups (alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-Proteobacteria and Archaea) whereas denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments of epibiotic bacteria revealed 50 bands. The bacterial community associated with S. serratum seems more diverse than in other marine crustaceans, such as Rimicaris. The relative diversity of this bacterial community was also studied in relation to the molt cycle. The comparison of DGGE band patterns of several individuals from female, pubescent male and senescent male groups revealed that the bacterial community diversity was dependent on the sex and the age of the individuals and more generally on the molt status.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 564
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Rossi, F.; Colao, E.; Martinez, M.J.; Klein, J.C.; Carcaillet, F.; Callier, M.D.; De Wit, R.; Caro, A.
Titre Spatial distribution and nutritional requirements of the endosymbiont-bearing bivalve Loripes lacteus (sensu Poli, 1791) in a Mediterranean Nanozostera noltii (Hornemann) meadow Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume (down) 440 Numéro Pages 108-115
Mots-Clés bacteria; Bivalve; codakia-orbicularis; food web; lucinoma-aequizonata; marine-invertebrates; mediterranean; new-zealand fjords; production; Seagrass; seagrass habitats; secondary; solemya-velum; Stable isotopes; sulfide-rich habitats; Symbiosis; thalassia-testudinum
Résumé Sulphur-oxidising endosymbiont-bearing bivalves often inhabit seagrass meadows, where they can control sulphide levels and variably contribute to carbon cycling, by feeding on endosymbiotic bacteria and/or on particulate organic matter from the water column. The patterns of variability in their feeding mode and their spatial distribution within the seagrass meadows are however poorly studied. Seagrass beds form naturally patchy habitats with seagrass-sand edges that may have variable effects on different organisms. The present study aims at understanding differences in feeding mode and abundance of the endosymbiont-bearing bivalve Loripes lacteus (sensu Poli, 1791) as well as the physiological conditions of its endosymbiotic populations between edge and inner portion of meadows of the eelgrass Nanozostera noltii (Hornemann). In July 2010, Loripes specimens were sampled in 4 eelgrass patches at 2 different locations in the Thau lagoon, South of France. There was a clear negative edge effect on the abundance of small individuals of Loripes, while large individuals were homogeneously distributed between edge and inner part of the meadow. Although Loripes isotopic signatures (delta C-13 and delta N-15) were always closer to those of its symbiotic bacteria than to those of suspension-feeding bivalves, eelgrass edge enhanced mixotrophic behaviour of small animals, which assimilated less bacterial carbon and nitrogen at the edge than in the inner part of the eelgrass meadow. No differences related to eelgrass edges were instead found for the bacterial populations harboured by Loripes. Rather, flow cytometry revealed large variability at small spatial scales. Although bacteria were always important for the nutrition of Loripes, these findings showed that seagrass edges may contribute to regulate feeding mode and population structure of Loripes, which may have implications for seagrass functioning. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: 105SJ<br/>Times Cited: 0<br/>Cited Reference Count: 57<br/>Rossi, Francesca Colao, Elodie Jose Martinez, Maria Klein, Judith C. Carcaillet, Frederique Callier, Myriam D. de Wit, Rutger Caro, Audrey<br/>Ec2co<br/>The authors wish to thank Patrice Got for its support in cytometric analyses. This work was partly supported by the EC2CO funded project “Le Cycle du carbone dans les reseaux trophiques des Herbiers face a l' Augmentation de la tempeRature et des sels nutritifs dans les lagunes Mediterraneennes (CHARM)” attributed to FR. [ST]<br/>Elsevier science bv<br/>Amsterdam</p> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 965
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur van der Heide, T.; Govers, L.L.; de Fouw, J.; Olff, H.; van der Geest, M.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Piersma, T.; van de Koppel, J.; Silliman, B.R.; Smolders, A.J.P.; van Gils, J.A.
Titre A three-stage symbiosis forms the foundation of seagrass ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Science
Volume (down) 336 Numéro Pages 1432-1434
Mots-Clés mutualistic networks zostera-marina biodiversity bivalves sulfide architecture diversity sediments bacteria mollusca
Résumé Seagrasses evolved from terrestrial plants into marine foundation species around 100 million years ago. Their ecological success, however, remains a mystery because natural organic matter accumulation within the beds should result in toxic sediment sulfide levels. Using a meta-analysis, a field study, and a laboratory experiment, we reveal how an ancient three-stage symbiosis between seagrass, lucinid bivalves, and their sulfide-oxidizing gill bacteria reduces sulfide stress for seagrasses. We found that the bivalve-sulfide-oxidizer symbiosis reduced sulfide levels and enhanced seagrass production as measured in biomass. In turn, the bivalves and their endosymbionts profit from organic matter accumulation and radial oxygen release from the seagrass roots. These findings elucidate the long-term success of seagrasses in warm waters and offer new prospects for seagrass ecosystem conservation.
Adresse [van der Heide, Tjisse; Olff, Han] Univ Groningen, CEES, Community & Conservat Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. [Govers, Laura L.; van Katwijk, Marieke M.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Dept Environm Sci, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Fac Sci, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands. [de Fouw, Jimmy; van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis; van Gils, Jan A.] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, CEES, Anim Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. [van de Koppel, Johan] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Ctr Estuarine & Marine Ecol, NL-4400 AC Yerseke, Netherlands. [Silliman, Brian R.] Univ Florida, Dept Biol, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA. [Smolders, Alfons J. P.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Dept Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, Fac Sci, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands. van der Heide, T (reprint author), Univ Groningen, CEES, Community & Conservat Ecol Grp, POB 11103, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands t.van.der.heide@rug.nl
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: 958BT Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 27 van der Heide, Tjisse Govers, Laura L. de Fouw, Jimmy Olff, Han van der Geest, Matthijs van Katwijk, Marieke M. Piersma, Theunis van de Koppel, Johan Silliman, Brian R. Smolders, Alfons J. P. van Gils, Jan A. “Waddenfonds” program; Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO)-WOTRO[W.01.65.221.00]; NWO-VIDI[864.09.002]; NSF; Andrew Mellon Foundation; Royal Netherlands Academy We thank G. Quaintenne and H. Blanchet for their help with the collection of Loripes; J. Eygensteyn and E. Pierson for technical assistance; and G. J. Vermeij, H. de Kroon, T. J. Bouma, E. J. Weerman, and C. Smit for their comments on the manuscript. T.v.d.H. was financially supported by the “Waddenfonds” program; M.v.d.G. and T.P. by the Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO)-WOTRO Integrated Programme grant W.01.65.221.00 awarded to T.P.; and J.d.F. and J.v.G. by the NWO-VIDI grant 864.09.002 awarded to J.v.G. B.S. was supported by an NSF CAREER award, the Andrew Mellon Foundation, and the Royal Netherlands Academy Visiting Professorship. The authors declare no conflicts of interest. A detailed description of all materials and methods, sources, as well as supplementary information are available as supplementary materials. The data are deposited in DRYAD at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.210mp. Amer assoc advancement science Washington Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 734 collection 1381
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Gounand, I.; Daufresne, T.; Gravel, D.; Bouvier, C.; Bouvier, T.; Combe, M.; Gougat-Barbera, C.; Poly, F.; Torres-Barcelo, C.; Mouquet, N.
Titre Size evolution in microorganisms masks trade-offs predicted by the growth rate hypothesis Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.
Volume (down) 283 Numéro 1845 Pages 20162272
Mots-Clés Bacteria; bacterial community; biological stoichiometry; cell-size; escherichia-coli; experimental evolution; fresh-water; growth rate hypothesis; inorganic polyphosphate; intrinsic growth; mechanistic approach; Pseudomonas fluorescens; resource competition; r/K strategies; Stoichiometry; variable environment
Résumé Adaptation to local resource availability depends on responses in growth rate and nutrient acquisition. The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) suggests that growing fast should impair competitive abilities for phosphorus and nitrogen due to high demand for biosynthesis. However, in microorganisms, size influences both growth and uptake rates, which may mask trade-offs and instead generate a positive relationship between these traits (size hypothesis, SH). Here, we evolved a gradient of maximum growth rate (mu(max)) from a single bacterium ancestor to test the relationship among mu(max), competitive ability for nutrients and cell size, while controlling for evolutionary history. We found a strong positive correlation between mu(max) and competitive ability for phosphorus, associated with a trade-off between mu(max) and cell size: strains selected for high mu(max) were smaller and better competitors for phosphorus. Our results strongly support the SH, while the trade-offs expected under GRH were not apparent. Beyond plasticity, unicellular populations can respond rapidly to selection pressure through joint evolution of their size and maximum growth rate. Our study stresses that physiological links between these traits tightly shape the evolution of competitive strategies.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2055
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement