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Auteur Gros, O.; Elisabeth, N.H.; Gustave, S.D.D.; Caro, A.; Dubilier, N.
Titre Plasticity of symbiont acquisition throughout the life cycle of the shallow-water tropical lucinid Codakia orbiculata (Mollusca: Bivalvia) Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Environ. Microbiol.
Volume 14 Numéro 6 Pages 1584-1595
Mots-Clés bacteria; bathymodiolus-azoricus; cold; endosymbiont transmission; gill-endosymbionts; identification; in-situ hybridization; population; seeps; sulfur; vertical transmission
Résumé In marine invertebrates that acquire their symbionts from the environment, these are generally only taken up during early developmental stages. In the symbiosis between lucinid clams and their intracellular sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, it has been shown that the juveniles acquire their symbionts from an environmental stock of free-living symbiont forms, but it is not known if adult clams are still competent to take up symbiotic bacteria from the environment. In this study, we investigated symbiont acquisition in adult specimens of the lucinid clam Codakia orbiculata, using transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and PCR. We show here that adults that had no detectable symbionts after starvation in aquaria for 6 months, rapidly reacquired symbionts within days after being returned to their natural environments in the field. Control specimens that were starved and then exposed to seawater aquaria with sulfide did not reacquire symbionts. This indicates that the reacquisition of symbionts in the starved clams returned to the field was not caused by high division rates of a small pool of remaining symbionts that we were not able to detect with the methods used here. Immunohistochemistry with an antibody against actin, a protein involved in the phagocytosis of intracellular bacteria, showed that actin was expressed at the apical ends of the gill cells that took up symbionts, providing further evidence that the symbionts were acquired from the environment. Interestingly, actin expression was also observed in symbiont-containing cells of untreated lucinids freshly collected from the environment, indicating that symbiont acquisition from the environment occurs continuously in these clams throughout their lifetime.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1462-2912 ISBN Médium (up)
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 784
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Auteur Brouwer, G.M.; Duijnstee, I. a. P.; Hazeleger, J.H.; Rossi, F.; Lourens, L.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Wolthers, M.
Titre Diet shifts and population dynamics of estuarine foraminifera during ecosystem recovery after experimentally induced hypoxia crises Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume 170 Numéro Pages 20-33
Mots-Clés Bacteria; Benthic foraminifera; C-13 label; communities; Diet shifts; differential response; diversity; Hypoxia; in-situ; Intertidal; Macrofauna; Meiofauna; microphytobenthos carbon; population dynamics; Sediment
Résumé This study shows foraminiferal dynamics after experimentally induced hypoxia within the wider context of ecosystem recovery. C-13-labeled bicarbonate and glucose were added to the sediments to examine foraminiferal diet shifts during ecosystem recovery and test-size measurements were used to deduce population dynamics. Hypoxia-treated and undisturbed patches were compared to distinguish natural (seasonal) fluctuations from hypoxia-induced responses. The effect of timing of disturbance and duration of recovery were investigated. The foraminiferal diets and population dynamics showed higher fluctuations in the recovering patches compared to the controls. The foraminiferal diet and population structure of Haynesina germanica and Ammonia beccarii responded differentially and generally inversely to progressive stages of ecosystem recovery. Tracer inferred diet estimates in April and June and the two distinctly visible cohorts in the test-size distribution, discussed to reflect reproduction in June, strongly suggest that the ample availability of diatoms during the first month of ecosystem recovery after the winter hypoxia was likely profitable to A. beccarii. Enhanced reproduction itself was strongly linked to the subsequent dietary shift to bacteria. The distribution of the test dimensions of H. germanica indicated that this species had less fluctuation in population structure during ecosystem recovery but possibly reproduced in response to the induced winter hypoxia. Bacteria seemed to consistently contribute more to the diet of H. germanica than diatoms. For the diet and test-size distribution of both species, the timing of disturbance seemed to have a higher impact than the duration of the subsequent recovery period. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium (up)
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2065
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Auteur Bettarel, Y.; Halary, S.; Auguet, J.-C.; Mai, T.C.; Bui, N.V.; Bouvier, T.; Got, P.; Bouvier, C.; Monteil-Bouchard, S.; Christelle, D.
Titre Corallivory and the microbial debacle in two branching scleractinians Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Isme J.
Volume 12 Numéro 4 Pages 1109-1126
Mots-Clés brown band disease; coral-associated bacteria; diversity; drupella-cornus; great-barrier-reef; network analysis; red-sea; search tool; viral communities; viruses
Résumé The grazing activity by specific marine organisms represents a growing threat to the survival of many scleractinian species. For example, the recent proliferation of the corallivorous gastropod Drupella now constitutes a critical case in all South-East Asian waters. If the damaging effects caused by this marine snail on coral polyps are relatively well known, the indirect incidence of predation on coral microbial associates is still obscure and might also potentially impair coral health. In this study, we compared the main ecological traits of coral-associated bacterial and viral communities living in the mucus layer of Acropora formosa and Acropora millepora, of healthy and predated individuals (i.e., colonized by Drupella rugosa), in the Bay of Van Phong (Vietnam). Our results show a substantial impact of the gastropod on a variety of microbiological markers. Colonized corals harbored much more abundant and active epibiotic bacteria whose community composition shifted toward more pathogenic taxa (belonging to the Vibrionales, Clostridiales, Campylobacterales, and Alteromonadales orders), together with their specific phages. Viral epibionts were also greatly influenced by Drupella corallivory with spectacular modifications in their concentrations, life strategies, genotype richness, and diversity. Novel and abundant circular Rep-encoding ssDNA viruses (CRESS-DNA viruses) were detected and characterized in grazed corals and we propose that their occurrence may serve as indicator of the coral health status. Finally, our results reveal that corallivory can cause severe dysbiosis by altering virus-bacteria interactions in the mucus layer, and ultimately favoring the development of local opportunistic infections.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium (up)
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2325
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Auteur Bonilla-Findji, O.; Rochelle-Newall, E.; Weinbauer, M.G.; Pizay, M.D.; Kerros, M.E.; Gattuso, J.P.
Titre Effect of seawater-freshwater cross-transplantations on viral dynamics and bacterial diversity and production Type Article scientifique
Année 2009 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Microb. Ecol.
Volume 54 Numéro 1 Pages 1-11
Mots-Clés aquatic systems; Bacterial production; Bacterial richness; bacterioplankton; batch cultures; chesapeake bay; Communities; community composition; dissolved organic-matter; estuarine salinity gradient; growth efficiency; marine; microbial; population-dynamics; Transplantation; Virus
Résumé Dilution experiments were carried out to investigate the community composition and the metabolic response of seawater and freshwater bacteria to cross-transplantation, and the effects of nor.-indigenous bacterial hosts on viral dynamics. Changes in viral and bacterial abundance and production, as Well as bacterial respiration, carbon demand and diversity were regularly monitored over a 6 d period. Bacterial production in the transplanted seawater (SB-t) and freshwater (FB-t) bacteria treatments was stimulated up to 256 and 221 %, respectively, compared to controls. The stimulation of bacterial production and carbon demand was accompanied by a decrease in bacterial richness. Net viral production was stimulated by 81% in SB-t and repressed by 75% in FB-t. Transplantation increased the virus-induced mortality of marine bacteria, but decreased it for freshwater bacteria. These results suggest that (1) marine bacteria can readily oxidize freshwater dissolved organic matter, and (2) freshwater viruses might be able to infect marine hosts, thus highlighting their potential role in fueling bacterial growth under resource stress or nutrient-depleted conditions.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0948-3055 ISBN Médium (up)
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 546
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Auteur Duval, C.; Thomazeau, S.; Drelin, Y.; Yepremian, C.; Bouvy, M.; Couloux, A.; Troussellier, M.; Rousseau, F.; Bernard, C.
Titre Phylogeny and salt-tolerance of freshwater Nostocales strains: Contribution to their systematics and evolution Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Harmful Algae
Volume 73 Numéro Pages 58-71
Mots-Clés baltic sea; bloom; comb. nova; Cyanobacteria; dolichospermum; genera anabaena; genetics analysis; great oxidation event; hetR; Morphology; nijH; Nostocaceae; Phylogeny; Physiology; planktonic cyanobacteria; polyphasic approach; Polyphasic approach; Salt-tolerance; toxin production
Résumé Phylogenetic relationships among heterocytous genera (the Nostocales order) have been profoundly modified since the use of polyphasic approaches that include molecular data. There is nonetheless still ample scope for improving phylogenetic delineations of genera with broad ecological distributions, particularly by integrating specimens from specific or up-to-now poorly sampled habitats. In this context, we studied 36 new isolates belonging to Chrysosporum, Dolichospermum, Anabaena, Anabaenopsis, and Cylindrospermopsis from freshwater ecosystems of Burkina-Faso, Senegal, and Mayotte Island. Studying strains from these habitats is of particular interest as we suspected different range of salt variations during underwent periods of drought in small ponds and lakes. Such salt variation may cause different adaptation to salinity. We then undertook a polyphasic approach, combining molecular phylogenies, morphological analyses, and physiological measurements of tolerance to salinity. Molecular phylogenies of 117 Nostocales sequences showed that the 36 studied strains were distributed in seven lineages: Dolichospermum, Chrysosporum, Cylindrospermopsis Raphidiopsis, Anabaenopsis, Anabaena sphaerica var tenuis/Sphaerospermopsis, and two independent Anabaena sphaerica lineages. Physiological data were congruent with molecular results supporting the separation into seven lineages. In an evolutionary context, salinity tolerance can be used as an integrative marker to reinforce the delineation of some cyanobacterial lineages. The history of this physiological trait contributes to a better understanding of processes leading to the divergence of cyanobacteria. In this study, most of the cyanobacterial strains isolated from freshwater environments were salt-tolerant, thus suggesting this trait constituted an ancestral trait of the heterocytous cyanobacteria and that it was probably lost two times secondarily and independently in the ancestor of Dolichospermum and of Cylindrospermopsis. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1568-9883 ISBN Médium (up)
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2341
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