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Auteur Hugoni, M.; Escalas, A.; Bernard, C.; Nicolas, S.; Jézéquel, D.; Vazzoler, F.; Sarazin, G.; Leboulanger, C.; Bouvy, M.; Got, P.; Ader, M.; Troussellier, M.; Agogué, H.
Titre Spatiotemporal variations in microbial diversity across the three domains of life in a tropical thalassohaline lake (Dziani Dzaha, Mayotte Island) Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Molecular Ecology
Volume 27 Numéro 23 Pages 4775-4786
Mots-Clés archaea; bacteria; eukaryotes; extreme environment; metabarcoding; thalassohaline lake
Résumé Thalassohaline ecosystems are hypersaline environments originating from seawater in which sodium chloride is the most abundant salt and the pH is alkaline. Studies focusing on microbial diversity in thalassohaline lakes are still scarce compared with those on athalassohaline lakes such as soda lakes that have no marine origin. In this work, we investigated multiple facets of bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic diversity in the thalassohaline Lake Dziani Dzaha using a metabarcoding approach. We showed that bacterial and archaeal diversity were mainly affected by contrasting physicochemical conditions retrieved at different depths. While photosynthetic microorganisms were dominant in surface layers, chemotrophic phyla (Firmicutes or Bacteroidetes) and archaeal methanogens dominated deeper layers. In contrast, eukaryotic diversity was constant regardless of depth and was affected by seasonality. A detailed focus on eukaryotic communities showed that this constant diversity profile was the consequence of the high predominance of Picocystis salinarum, while nondominant eukaryotic groups displayed seasonal diversity turnover. Altogether, our results provided an extensive description of the diversity of the three domains of life in an unexplored extreme environment and showed clear differences in the responses of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities to environmental conditions.
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Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1365-294x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2460
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Auteur Jacquemot, L.; Bettarel, Y.; Monjol, J.; Corre, E.; Halary, S.; Desnues, C.; Bouvier, T.; Ferrier-Pages, C.; Baudoux, A.-C.
Titre Therapeutic potential of a new jumbo phage that infects Vibrio coralliilyticus, a widespread coral pathogen Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Microbiol.
Volume 9 Numéro Pages 2501
Mots-Clés bacterial pathogen; bacteriophages; coral disease; database; disease; phage therapy; phage-host interactions; phi-kz; ralstonia-solanacearum; reef ecosystems; sequence; transfer-rna genes; Vibrio coralliilyticus; viral genomics; virulence factors
Résumé Biological control using bacteriophages is a promising approach for mitigating the devastating effects of coral diseases. Several phages that infect Vibrio coralliilyticus, a widespread coral pathogen, have been isolated, suggesting that this bacterium is permissive to viral infection and is, therefore, a suitable candidate for treatment by phage therapy. In this study, we combined functional and genomic approaches to evaluate the therapeutic potential of BONAISHI, a novel V. coralliilyticus phage, which was isolated from the coral reef in Van Phong Bay (Vietnam). BONAISHI appears to be strictly lytic for several pathogenic strains of V. coralliilyticus and remains infectious over a broad range of environmental conditions. This candidate has an unusually large dsDNA genome (303 kb), with no genes that encode known toxins or implicated in lysogeny control. We identified several proteins involved in host lysis, which may offer an interesting alternative to the use of whole bacteriophages for controlling V. coralliilyticus. A preliminary therapy test showed that adding BONAISHI to an infected culture of Symbiodinium sp. cells reduced the impact of V. coralliilyticus on Symbiodinium sp. photosynthetic activity. This study showed that BONAISHI is able to mitigate V. coralliilyticus infections, making it a good candidate for phage therapy for coral disease.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1664-302x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2446
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Auteur Jeanbille, M.; Gury, J.; Duran, R.; Tronczynski, J.; Ghiglione, J.-F.; Agogué, H.; Ben Said, O.; Taib, N.; Debroas, D.; Garnier, C.; Auguet, J.-C.
Titre Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Microbiol.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages Unsp-1303
Mots-Clés archaeal communities; bacterial communities; benthic biodiversity; chronic contamination; coastal sediment; deep-sea; degrading bacteria; functional diversity; gulf-of-mexico; harbor sediments; horizon oil-spill; microbial communities; pah; polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons
Résumé Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1664-302x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1662
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Auteur Joux, F.; Bertrand, J.-C.; De Wit, R.; Grossi, V.; Intertaglia, L.; Lebaron, P.; Michotey, V.; Normand, P.; Peyret, P.; Raimbault, P.; Tamburini, C.; Urios, L.
Titre Methods for Studying Microorganisms in the Environment Type Chapitre de livre
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée
Volume Numéro Pages 757-829
Mots-Clés Bacterial isolation; Biomarkers; Cultural techniques; Cytometry; DNA microarray; Microbial activities; Microbial Ecology; Microelectrodes; Molecular fingerprints; Pcr; Phospholipid fatty acid analyses; Pigment analyses; Sampling techniques
Résumé The main methods for the study of microorganisms in the environment (water, soil, sediment, biofilms), the different techniques of sampling for measuring biomass, the activities, and the diversity of the microorganisms are presented. To respond to these various issues, techniques as varied as those of flow cytometry, molecular biology, biochemistry, molecular isotopic tools, or electrochemistry are implemented. These different techniques are described with their advantages and disadvantages for different types of biotopes. The question of the isolation, culture, and conservation of microorganisms from the environment are also addressed. Without being exhaustive, this chapter emphasizes the importance of using appropriate and efficient methodological tools to properly explore the still mysterious compartment of microorganisms in the environment.
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Editeur Springer Netherlands Lieu de Publication Éditeur Bertrand, J.-C.; Caumette, P.; Lebaron, P.; Matheron, R.; Normand, P.; Sime-Ngando, T.
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Environmental Microbiology: Fundamentals and Applications
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-94-017-9117-5 978-94-017-9118-2 Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1393
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Auteur Kadowaki, K.; Barbera, C.G.; Godsoe, W.; Delsuc, F.; Mouquet, N.
Titre Predicting biotic interactions and their variability in a changing environment Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.
Volume 12 Numéro 5 Pages 20151073
Mots-Clés Bacteria; climate-change; climate change; distribution models; diversity; extinction risk; global change; microcosm; phylogeny; predictive ecology; range; responses; shifts
Résumé Global environmental change is altering the patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Observation and theory suggest that species' distributions and abundances depend on a suite of processes, notably abiotic filtering and biotic interactions, both of which are constrained by species' phylogenetic history. Models predicting species distribution have historically mostly considered abiotic filtering and are only starting to integrate biotic interaction. However, using information on present interactions to forecast the future of biodiversity supposes that biotic interactions will not change when species are confronted with new environments. Using bacterial microcosms, we illustrate how biotic interactions can vary along an environmental gradient and how this variability can depend on the phylogenetic distance between interacting species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1653
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