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Auteur Boukef, I.; El Bour, M.; Al Gallas, N.; El Bahri, O.; Mejri, S.; Mraouna, R.; Ben Aissa, R.; Boudabous, A.; Got, P.; Troussellier, M.
Titre Survival of Escherichia coli Strains in Mediterranean Brackish Water in the Bizerte Lagoon in Northern Tunisia Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Water Environ Res
Volume 82 Numéro 11 Pages 2249-2257
Mots-Clés bizerte lagoon; brackish water; coastal waters; cytotoxicity; enteric bacteria; escherichia coli; fecal-coliforms; marine waters; salmonella-typhimurium; seawater microcosms; sewage; shigella-dysenteriae type-1; sunlight; survival; viability; virulence
Résumé This study investigated survival and virulence of Escherichia coli strains exposed to natural conditions in brackish water. Two E. coli strains (O126:B16 and O55:B5) were incubated in water microcosms in the Bizerte lagoon in Northern Tunisia and exposed for 12 days to natural sunlight in June (231 to 386 W/m(2), 26 +/- 1 degrees C, 30 g/L) and in April (227 to 330 W/m(2), 17 +/- 1 degrees C, 27 g/L) or maintained in darkness for 21 days (17 +/- 1 degrees C, 27 g/L). The results revealed that sunlight was the most significant inactivating factor (decrease of 3 Ulog within 48 hours for the two strains) compared to salinity and temperature (in darkness). Survival time of the strains was prolonged as they were maintained in darkness. Local strain (E. coli O55:B5) showed better survival capacity (T(90) = 52 hours) than E. coli O126:B16 (T(90) = 11 h). For both, modifications were noted only for some metabolic activities of carbohydrates hydrolysis. Cytotoxicity of the two strains, tested on Vero cell, was maintained during the period of survival. Water Environ. Res., 82, 2249 (2010).
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1061-4303 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 864
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Auteur Bouvier, T.; Venail, P.; Pommier, T.; Bouvier, C.; Barbera, C.; Mouquet, N.
Titre Contrasted Effects of Diversity and Immigration on Ecological Insurance in Marine Bacterioplankton Communities Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS One
Volume 7 Numéro 6 Pages
Mots-Clés 16s ribosomal-rna; bacterial communities; biodiversity; dispersal; fresh-water; gradient gel-electrophoresis; metacommunities; predictability; productivity; stability
Résumé The ecological insurance hypothesis predicts a positive effect of species richness on ecosystem functioning in a variable environment. This effect stems from temporal and spatial complementarity among species within metacommunities coupled with optimal levels of dispersal. Despite its importance in the context of global change by human activities, empirical evidence for ecological insurance remains scarce and controversial. Here we use natural aquatic bacterial communities to explore some of the predictions of the spatial and temporal aspects of the ecological insurance hypothesis. Addressing ecological insurance with bacterioplankton is of strong relevance given their central role in fundamental ecosystem processes. Our experimental set up consisted of water and bacterioplankton communities from two contrasting coastal lagoons. In order to mimic environmental fluctuations, the bacterioplankton community from one lagoon was successively transferred between tanks containing water from each of the two lagoons. We manipulated initial bacterial diversity for experimental communities and immigration during the experiment. We found that the abundance and production of bacterioplankton communities was higher and more stable (lower temporal variance) for treatments with high initial bacterial diversity. Immigration was only marginally beneficial to bacterial communities, probably because microbial communities operate at different time scales compared to the frequency of perturbation selected in this study, and of their intrinsic high physiologic plasticity. Such local “physiological insurance” may have a strong significance for the maintenance of bacterial abundance and production in the face of environmental perturbations.
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 499
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Auteur Bouvy, M.; Combe, M.; Bettarel, Y.; Dupuy, C.; Rochelle-Newall, E.; Charpy, L.
Titre Uncoupled viral and bacterial distributions in coral reef waters of Tuamotu Archipelago (French Polynesia) Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin
Volume 65 Numéro 10–12 Pages 506-515
Mots-Clés Coral reef waters; Distributions; Strategy lifes; Virus; bacteria
Résumé This study examined the distribution of virioplankton and bacterioplankton in two coral reef systems (Ahe and Takaroa atolls) in the Tuamotu Archipelago, in comparison with the surrounding oligotrophic ocean. Mean concentrations of 4.8 × 105 and 6.2 × 105 cells ml−1 for bacteria and 8.1 × 106 and 4.3 × 106 VLP (virus-like particle) ml−1 were recorded in Ahe and Takaroa lagoons, respectively. Chlorophyll-a concentrations and dissolved organic matter were higher in Ahe whereas 3H thymidine incorporation rates were higher in Takaroa. First data on lytic and lysogenic strategies of phages in coral reef environments were discussed in this paper. The fraction of visibly infected cells by viruses was negligible regardless of the lagoon station (mean = 0.15%). However, the fraction of lysogenic cells ranged between 2.5% and 88.9%. Our results suggest that the distribution patterns of virioplankton are apparently not coupled to the spatial dynamics of the bacterioplankton communities.
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ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 923
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Auteur Brauer, V.S.; Stomp, M.; Bouvier, T.; Fouilland, E.; Leboulanger, C.; Confurius-Guns, V.; Weissing, F.J.; Stal, L.J.; Huisman, J.
Titre Competition and facilitation between the marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteriunn Cyanothece and its associated bacterial community Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Frontiers in Microbiology Revue Abrégée
Volume 5 Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs; cyanobacteria; heterotrophic bacteria; microbiota; nitrogen fixation; Phytoplankton; resource competition; species interactions
Résumé N-2-fixing cyanobacteria represent a major source of new nitrogen and carbon for marine microbial communities, but little is known about their ecological interactions with associated microbiota. In this study we investigated the interactions between the unicellular N-2-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Miami BG043511 and its associated free-living chemotrophic bacteria at different concentrations of nitrate and dissolved organic carbon and different temperatures. High temperature strongly stimulated the growth of Cyanothece, but had less effect on the growth and community composition of the chemotrophic bacteria. Conversely, nitrate and carbon addition did not significantly increase the abundance of Cyanothece, but strongly affected the abundance and species composition of the associated chemotrophic bacteria. In nitrate-free medium the associated bacterial community was co-dominated by the putative diazotroph Mesorhizobium and the putative aerobic anoxygenic phototroph Erythrobacter and after addition of organic carbon also by the Flavobacterium Muricauda. Addition of nitrate shifted the composition toward co-dominance by Erythrobacter and the Gammaproteobacterium Marinobacter. Our results indicate that Cyanothece modified the species composition of its associated bacteria through a combination of competition and facilitation. Furthermore, within the bacterial community, niche differentiation appeared to play an important role, contributing to the coexistence of a variety of different functional groups. An important implication of these findings is that changes in nitrogen and carbon availability due to, e.g., eutrophication and climate change are likely to have a major impact on the species composition of the bacterial community associated with N-2-fixing cyanobacteria.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1101
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Auteur Brauer, V.S.; Stomp, M.; Rosso, C.; van Beusekom, S.A.M.; Emmerich, B.; Stal, L.J.; Huisman, J.
Titre Low temperature delays timing and enhances the cost of nitrogen fixation in the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée The ISME journal
Volume 7 Numéro 11 Pages 2105-2115
Mots-Clés climate change; day-night cycle; nitrogen fixation; nitrogenase; respiration; unicellular cyanobacteria
Résumé Marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are largely confined to the tropical and subtropical ocean. It has been argued that their global biogeographical distribution reflects the physiologically feasible temperature range at which they can perform nitrogen fixation. In this study we refine this line of argumentation for the globally important group of unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria, and pose the following two hypotheses: (i) nitrogen fixation is limited by nitrogenase activity at low temperature and by oxygen diffusion at high temperature, which is manifested by a shift from strong to weak temperature dependence of nitrogenase activity, and (ii) high respiration rates are required to maintain very low levels of oxygen for nitrogenase, which results in enhanced respiratory cost per molecule of fixed nitrogen at low temperature. We tested these hypotheses in laboratory experiments with the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. BG043511. In line with the first hypothesis, the specific growth rate increased strongly with temperature from 18 to 30 degrees C, but leveled off at higher temperature under nitrogen-fixing conditions. As predicted by the second hypothesis, the respiratory cost of nitrogen fixation and also the cellular C:N ratio rose sharply at temperatures below 21 degrees C. In addition, we found that low temperature caused a strong delay in the onset of the nocturnal nitrogenase activity, which shortened the remaining nighttime available for nitrogen fixation. Together, these results point at a lower temperature limit for unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, which offers an explanation for their (sub)tropical distribution and suggests expansion of their biogeographical range by global warming.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1751-7370 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 696
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