|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur Alfonso, S.; Sadoul, B.; Cousin, X.; Begout, M.-L.
Titre Spatial distribution and activity patterns as welfare indicators in response to water quality changes in European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.
Volume 226 Numéro Pages Unsp-104974
Mots-Clés ammonia toxicity; atlantic salmon; avoidance-behavior; behavioral-responses; Behaviour; current issues; Fish; hyperoxia; hypoxia tolerance; marine fish; rainbow-trout; Stress; stress-response; Water quality; Welfare
Résumé In aquaculture, fish are exposed to unavoidable stressors that can be detrimental for their health and welfare. However, welfare in farmed fish can be difficult to assess, and, so far, no standardized test has been universally accepted as a welfare indicator. This work contributes to the establishment of behavioural welfare indicators in a marine teleost in response to different water quality acute stressors. Groups of ten fish were exposed to high Total Ammonia Nitrogen concentration (High TAN, 18 mg.L-1), Hyperoxia (200 % O-2 saturation), Hypoxia (20 % O-2 saturation), or control water quality (100% O-2 saturation and TAN < 2.5 mg.L-1) over 1 hour. Fish were then transferred in a novel environment for a group behaviour test under the same water quality conditions over 2 hours. Videos were recorded to assess thigmotaxis, activity and group cohesion. After this challenge, plasma cortisol concentration was measured in a subsample, while individual behavioural response was measured in the other fish using novel tank diving test. Prior to this study, the novel tank diving test was validated as a behavioural challenge indicative of anxiety state, by using nicotine as anxiolytic drug. Overall, all stress conditions induced a decrease in activity and thigmotaxis and changes in group cohesion while only fish exposed to Hypoxia and High TAN conditions displayed elevated plasma cortisol concentrations. In post-stress condition, activity was still affected but normal behaviour was recovered within the 25 minutes of the test duration. Our work suggests that the activity, thigmotaxis and group cohesion are good behavioural indicators of exposure to degraded water quality, and could be used as standardized measures to assess fish welfare.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000531095400002 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2794
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Stelfox, M.; Lett, C.; Reid, G.; Souch, G.; Sweet, M.
Titre Minimum drift times infer trajectories of ghost nets found in the Maldives Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Pollut. Bull.
Volume 154 Numéro Pages 111037
Mots-Clés atlantic; barnacles; Biofouling; Drift trajectories; floating debris; Ghost nets; Gill nets; growth; impacts; Lagrangian; marine debris; near-surface currents; plastic debris; Plastics; Plastisphere; Pollution; Purse seine; transport; wind
Résumé This study explores methods to estimate minimum drift times of ghost nets found in the Maldives with the aim of identifying a putative origin. We highlight that percentage cover of biofouling organisms and capitulum length of Lepas anatifera are two methods that provide these estimates. Eight ghost nets were collected in the Maldives and estimated drift times ranged between 7.5 and 101 days. Additionally, Lagrangian simulations identified drift trajectories of 326 historical ghost nets records. Purse seine fisheries (associated with Korea, Mauritius, the Philippines, Spain, France and Seychelles) and gill nets from Sri Lanka were identified as 'high risk' fisheries with regard to likley origins of ghost nets drifting into the Maldives. These fisheries are active in areas where dense particle clusters occured (drift trajectories between 30 and 120 days). Interestingly, ghost nets drifting less than 30 days however, remained inside the exclusive economic zone of the Maldivian archipelago highlighting potential illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing activity is occuring in this area. This study therefore points to the urgent need for gear loss reporting to be undertaken, especially by purse seine and gill net fisheries in order to ascertain the source of this major threat to marine life. This should also be coupled with an improvment in the data focused on spatial distribution of the abandoned, lost or discarded fishing gear originating from both largeand small-scale fisheries.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000528205900012 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2798
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur de Verdal, H.; O'Connell, C.M.; Mekkawy, W.; Vandeputte, M.; Chatain, B.; Begout, M.-L.; Benzie, J.A.H.
Titre Agonistic behaviour and feed efficiency in juvenile Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture
Volume 505 Numéro Pages 271-279
Mots-Clés Agonstic behaviour; arctic charr; atlantic salmon; brain serotonergic activity; brown trout; conversion ratio; Correlation; dominance relationships; Feed efficiency; food acquisition; genetic-improvement; Nile tilapia; Performances; salvelinus-alpinus; social-status
Résumé Given the strong effects of behavioural hierarchies on growth in many cultured species and the key role of feed efficiency in aquaculture economics, understanding the nature of the interaction of these variables is important for the sustainability of aquaculture. The relationship between agonistic behaviour, growth and feed efficiency in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, was studied by rearing 120 fish in eight aquaria. Fish were video-recorded to estimate the occurrence of agonistic behaviour during a fasting and a refeeding period. Growth, feed intake and feed conversion efficiency (FCE – calculated as the inverse of feed conversion ratio (FCR)) were subsequently measured individually for each fish. Fish showed 58% less agonistic traits during the fasting period compared to the feeding period, but generally, an aggressive fish during the fasting period was also aggressive during the refeeding period. The nature of agonistic behaviours between individuals was used to assess the presence of hierarchical relationships between fish. There were dominance hierarchies established in each experimental aquarium that despite minor shifts were maintained throughout the experiment. Agonistic behaviours were strongly correlated with each other, the aggression Index (AI) and with hierarchy rank. PCA analysis of the agonistic behaviours summarising the behavioural information showed little or no correlation between agonistic behaviour, fish growth or FCE. FCE was correlated with body weight gain (BWG). These results suggest that agonistic interactions in juvenile Nile tilapia do not have a large impact on growth and feed conversion efficiency.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2583
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Boavida, J.; Becheler, R.; Choquet, M.; Frank, N.; Taviani, M.; Bourillet, J.-F.; Meistertzheim, A.-L.; Grehan, A.; Savini, A.; Arnaud-Haond, S.
Titre Out of the Mediterranean? Post-glacial colonization pathways varied among cold-water coral species Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 46 Numéro 5 Pages 915-931
Mots-Clés biodiversity; cold-water corals; computer-program; deep-sea; deep-sea corals; genetic-structure; glacial marine refugia; glacial refugia; growth; in-situ; Last Glacial Maximum; Lophelia pertusa; lophelia-pertusa; Madrepora oculata; marine phylogeography; north-atlantic ocean; software
Résumé Aim: To infer cold-water corals' (CWC) post-glacial phylogeography and assess the role of Mediterranean Sea glacial refugia as origins for the recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. Location: Northeastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Taxon: Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata. Methods: We sampled CWC using remotely operated vehicles and one sediment core for coral and sediment dating. We characterized spatial genetic patterns (microsatellites and a nuclear gene fragment) using networks, clustering and measures of genetic differentiation. Results: Inferences from microsatellite and sequence data were congruent, and showed a contrast between the two CWC species. Populations of L. pertusa present a dominant pioneer haplotype, local haplotype radiations and a majority of endemic variation in lower latitudes. Madrepora oculata populations are differentiated across the northeastern Atlantic and genetic lineages are poorly admixed even among neighbouring sites. Conclusions: Our study shows contrasting post-glacial colonization pathways for two key habitat-forming species in the deep sea. The CWC L. pertusa has likely undertaken a long-range (post-glacial) recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic directly from refugia located along southern Europe (Mediterranean Sea or Gulf of Cadiz). In contrast, the stronger genetic differentiation of M. oculata populations mirrors the effects of long-term isolation in multiple refugia. We suggest that the distinct and genetically divergent, refugial populations initiated the post-glacial recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic margins, leading to a secondary contact in the northern range and reaching higher latitudes much later, in the late Holocene. This study highlights the need to disentangle the influences of present-day dispersal and evolutionary processes on the distribution of genetic polymorphisms, to unravel the influence of past and future environmental changes on the connectivity of cosmopolitan deep-sea ecosystems associated with CWC.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000471344900007 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2602
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Cocquempot, L.; Delacourt, C.; Paillet, J.; Riou, P.; Aucan, J.; Castelle, B.; Charria, G.; Claudet, J.; Conan, P.; Coppola, L.; Hocdé, R.; Planes, S.; Raimbault, P.; Savoye, N.; Testut, L.; Vuillemin, R.
Titre Coastal Ocean and Nearshore Observation: A French Case Study Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 6 Numéro Pages Unsp-324
Mots-Clés 2013/2014 winter; atlantic coast; coastal ocean; coastline; diversity; ecosystem; increases; interdisciplinary; national structuration; nutrient ratios; observation infrastructure; phytoplankton community; temperature; variability; wave activity
Résumé To understand and predict the physical, chemical, and biological processes at play in coastal and nearshore marine areas requires an integrated, interdisciplinary approach. The case study of the French structuration of coastal ocean and nearshore observing systems provides an original overview on a federative research infrastructure named ILICO. It is a notable example of national structuration and pan-institution efforts to investigate the forefront of knowledge on the processes at work within the critical coastal zone. ILICO comprises, in a pluridisciplinary approach, eight distributed network-systems of observation and data analysis that are accredited and financially supported by French research institutions and the French Ministry for Higher Education, Research, and Innovation. ILICO observation points are implemented along metropolitan and overseas French coasts, where coastline dynamics, sea level evolution, physical and biogeochemical water properties, coastal water dynamics, phytoplankton composition, and health of coral reefs are monitored in order to address a wide range of scientific questions. To give an overview of the diversity and potential of the observations carried out, this paper offers a detailed presentation of three constituting networks: Service Observation en Milieu LITtoral (SOMLIT), with homogeneous sampling strategies, DYNALIT, with heterogeneous sampling strategies adapted to different environments, and Mediterranean Ocean Observing System for the Environment (MOOSE), an integrated, pluri-disciplinary coasta/offshore regional observatory in the north-western Mediterranean Sea. ILICO was conceived using a European framework. It addresses the great challenges of the next decade in terms of sustainability, cost-efficiency, interoperability, and innovation. This paper emphasizes the added-value of federating these systems, and highlights some recommendations for the future.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2604
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement