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Auteur Dambrine, C.; Huret, M.; Woillez, M.; Pecquerie, L.; Allal, F.; Servili, A.; de Pontual, H.
Titre Contribution of a bioenergetics model to investigate the growth and survival of European seabass in the Bay of Biscay – English Channel area Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling
Volume 423 Numéro Pages 109007
Mots-Clés Dynamic Energy Budget theory; Early-life stages; Growth, Starvation; Northeast Atlantic
Résumé The European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is a species of particular ecological and economic importance. Stock assessments have recently revealed the worrying state of the “Northern stock”, probably due to overfishing and a series of poor recruitments. The extent to which these poor recruitments are due to environmental variability is difficult to assess, as the processes driving the seabass life cycle are poorly known. Here we investigate how food availability and temperature may affect the growth and survival of wild seabass at the individual scale. To this end, we developed a bioenergetics model based on the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory. We applied it to seabass population of the Northeast Atlantic region (Bay of Biscay – English Channel area) throughout their entire life cycle. We calibrated the model using a combination of age-related length and weight datasets: two were from aquaculture experiments (larvae and juveniles raised at 15 and 20°C) and one from a wild population (juveniles and adults collected during surveys or fish market sampling). By calibrating the scaled functional response that rules the ingestion of food and using average temperature conditions experienced by wild seabass (obtained from tagged individuals), the model was able to reproduce the duration of the different stages, the growth of the individuals, the number of batches and their survival to starvation. We also captured one of the major differences encountered in the life traits of the species: farmed fish mature earlier than wild fish (3 to 4 years old vs. 6 years old on average for females, respectively) probably due to better feeding conditions and higher temperature. We explored the growth and survival of larvae and juveniles by exposing the individuals to varying temperatures and food levels (including total starvation). We show that early life stages of seabass have a strong capacity to deal with food deprivation: the model estimated that first feeding larvae could survive 17 days at 15°C. We also tested individual variability by adjusting the specific maximum assimilation rate and found that larvae and juveniles with higher assimilation capacity better survived low food levels at a higher temperature. We discuss our results in the context of the recent years of poor recruitment faced by European seabass.
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ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000525397200005 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2724
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Auteur Eduardo Nole, L.; Bertrand, A.; Fredou, T.; Lira, A.S.; Lima, R.S.; Ferreira, B.P.; Menard, F.; Lucena-Fredou, F.
Titre Biodiversity, ecology, fisheries, and use and trade of Tetraodontiformes fishes reveal their socio-ecological significance along the tropical Brazilian continental shelf Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Conserv.-Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés aquarium trade; atlantic; caught; climate change; coast; coral; habitat; habitat loss; patterns; poison-fish; state; underwater footages
Résumé Tetraodontiformes fishes play a critical role in benthic and demersal communities and are facing threats due to anthropogenic impacts and climate change. However, they are poorly studied worldwide. To improve knowledge on the socio-ecological significance and conservation of Tetraodontiformes a review of literature addressing the diversity, ecology, use and trade, conservation, and main threats of Tetraodontiformes combined with a comprehensive in situ dataset from two broad-range multidisciplinary oceanographic surveys performed along the Tropical Brazilian Continental Shelf was undertaken. Twenty-nine species were identified, being primarily found on coral reefs and algal ecosystems. At these habitats, tetraodontids present highly diversified trophic categories and might play an important role by balancing the marine food web Coral reef ecosystems, especially those near to the shelf break, seem to be the most important areas of Tetraodontiformes fishes, concentrating the highest values of species richness, relative abundance and the uncommon and Near Threatened species. Ninety per cent of species are commonly caught as bycatch, being also used in the ornamental trade (69%) and as food (52%), serving as an important source of income for artisanal local fisheries. Tetraodontiformes are threatened by unregulated fisheries, overexploitation, bycatch, and habitat loss due to coral reef degradation and the potential effects of climate change. These factors are more broadly impacting global biodiversity, food security, and other related ecosystem functions upon which humans and many other organisms rely. We recommend the following steps that could improve the conservation of Tetraodontiformes along the tropical Brazilian Continental shelf and elsewhere: (i) data collection of the commercial, incidental, ornamental and recreational catches; (ii) improvement of the current legislation directed at the marine ornamental harvesting; (iii) increase efforts focused on the education and conservation awareness in coastal tourism and communities; and, most important, (iv) creation of marine reserves networks in priority areas of conservation, protecting either the species and key habitats for its survival.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1052-7613 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000508486400001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2734
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Auteur Puerta, P.; Johnson, C.; Carreiro-Silva, M.; Henry, L.-A.; Kenchington, E.; Morato, T.; Kazanidis, G.; Luis Rueda, J.; Urra, J.; Ross, S.; Wei, C.-L.; Manuel Gonzalez-Irusta, J.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Orejas, C.
Titre Influence of Water Masses on the Biodiversity and Biogeography of Deep-Sea Benthic Ecosystems in the North Atlantic Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages 239
Mots-Clés antarctic intermediate water; biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change impacts; coral lophelia-pertusa; deep-sea; food-supply mechanisms; global habitat suitability; meridional overturning circulation; ne atlantic; North Atlantic; ocean acidification; porcupine seabight; rockall trough margin; vulnerable marine ecosystems; water masses
Résumé Circulation patterns in the North Atlantic Ocean have changed and re-organized multiple times over millions of years, influencing the biodiversity, distribution, and connectivity patterns of deep-sea species and ecosystems. In this study, we review the effects of the water mass properties (temperature, salinity, food supply, carbonate chemistry, and oxygen) on deep-sea benthic megafauna (from species to community level) and discussed in future scenarios of climate change. We focus on the key oceanic controls on deep-sea megafauna biodiversity and biogeography patterns. We place particular attention on cold-water corals and sponges, as these are ecosystem-engineering organisms that constitute vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME) with high associated biodiversity. Besides documenting the current state of the knowledge on this topic, a future scenario for water mass properties in the deep North Atlantic basin was predicted. The pace and severity of climate change in the deep-sea will vary across regions. However, predicted water mass properties showed that all regions in the North Atlantic will be exposed to multiple stressors by 2100, experiencing at least one critical change in water temperature (+2 degrees C), organic carbon fluxes (reduced up to 50%), ocean acidification (pH reduced up to 0.3), aragonite saturation horizon (shoaling above 1000 m) and/or reduction in dissolved oxygen (> 5%). The northernmost regions of the North Atlantic will suffer the greatest impacts. Warmer and more acidic oceans will drastically reduce the suitable habitat for ecosystem-engineers, with severe consequences such as declines in population densities, even compromising their long-term survival, loss of biodiversity and reduced biogeographic distribution that might compromise connectivity at large scales. These effects can be aggravated by reductions in carbon fluxes, particularly in areas where food availability is already limited. Declines in benthic biomass and biodiversity will diminish ecosystem services such as habitat provision, nutrient cycling, etc. This study shows that the deep-sea VME affected by contemporary anthropogenic impacts and with the ongoing climate change impacts are unlikely to withstand additional pressures from more intrusive human activities. This study serves also as a warning to protect these ecosystems through regulations and by tempering the ongoing socio-political drivers for increasing exploitation of marine resources.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
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Notes WOS:000526864100001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2767
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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Bonhommeau, S.; Giordano, N.; Giordano, F.; Ellul, S.; Ellul, G.; Deguara, S.; Wendling, B.; Bernard, S.; Kerzerho, V.
Titre Tagging Atlantic bluefin tuna from a Mediterranean spawning ground using a purse seiner Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish Res.
Volume 226 Numéro Pages 105522
Mots-Clés Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean stock; Electronic tagging; Large Atlantic bluefin tuna; migration; Migrations; movements; population-structure; Purse seine; thermal biology; thunnus-thynnus
Résumé Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, is as an emblematic and commercially valuable large pelagic species. In the past ten years, the purse seine fishery in the Mediterranean represents more than 50 % of the catch. Nowadays, purse seines target large fish and operate during the spawning season in the spawning grounds. Electronic tagging has shed a considerable amount of light on the ecology and behaviour of bluefin tuna over the past twenty years. However, such technique has rarely been applied on large bluefin tunas caught by the Mediterranean purse seine fishery despite its major importance. The logistical constraints related to this specific fishery, combined with the timing of migration of the fish and the requirements related to the handling of big fish have made adequate tagging from purse seines complex. Here we detail such an operation, designed to bridge the knowledge gap on the migratory behaviour of tunas targeted by the purse seine fishery. Three large bluefin tunas from the same school were tagged during the fishing operation of a French purse seine, resulting in a different migration pattern than previous deployments. The fish were tagged onboard in less than 2 min and efficiently, avoiding any subsequent mortality. These results contrast with those from tagging operations carried out in the Northwest Mediterranean, which underlies the importance of tagging operations from purse seines to obtain unbiased description of the movements of the eastern Atlantic bluefin tuna stock in the context of its management.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000525305200010 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2771
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Auteur Mannocci, L.; Roberts, J.J.; Pedersen, E.J.; Halpin, P.N.
Titre Geographical differences in habitat relationships of cetaceans across an ocean basin Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés associations; atlantic; conservation; distribution models; diversity; environmental predictors; geographical variation; habitat relationships; highly mobile marine species; marine mammals; North Atlantic Ocean; populations; predator; species distribution modeling; temperature; whales
Résumé The distributions of highly mobile marine species such as cetaceans are increasingly modeled at basin scale by combining data from multiple regions. However, these basin-wide models often overlook geographical variations in species habitat relationships between regions. We tested for geographical variations in habitat relationships for a suite of cetacean taxa between the two sides of the North Atlantic basin. Using cetacean visual survey data and remote sensing data from the western and eastern basin in summer, we related the probability of presence of twelve cetacean taxa from three guilds to seafloor depth, sea surface temperature and primary productivity. In a generalized additive model framework, we fitted 1) basin-wide (BW) models, assuming a single global relationship, 2) region-specific intercepts (RI) models, assuming relationships with the same shape in both regions, but allowing a region-specific intercept and 3) region-specific shape (RS) models, assuming relationships with different shapes between regions. RS models mostly yielded significantly better fits than BW models, indicating cetacean occurrences were better modeled with region-specific than with global relationships. The better fits of RS models over RI models further provided statistical evidence for differences in the shapes of region-specific relationships. Baleen whales showed striking differences in both the shapes of relationships and their mean presence probabilities between regions. Deep diving whales and delphinoids showed contrasting relationships between regions with few exceptions (e.g. non-statistically different shapes of region-specific relationships for harbor porpoise and beaked whales with depth). Our findings stress the need to account for geographical differences in habitat relationships between regions when modeling species distributions from combined data at the basin scale. Our proposed hypotheses offer a roadmap for understanding why habitat relationships may geographically vary in cetaceans and other highly mobile marine species.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000531110000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2792
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