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Auteur Killen, S.S.; Marras, S.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre Fast growers sprint slower: effects of food deprivation and re-feeding on sprint swimming performance in individual juvenile European sea bass Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology
Volume (down) 217 Numéro 6 Pages 859-865
Mots-Clés Compensatory growth; Ecophysiology; Food deprivation; Foraging; Locomotion; atlantic; catch-up growth; cod; dicentrarchus-labrax; ecological performance; gadus-morhua; long-term starvation; metabolic responses; salmon; teleost fish; trade-off; trade-offs; trout oncorhynchus-mykiss
Résumé While many ectothermic species can withstand prolonged fasting without mortality, food deprivation may have sublethal effects of ecological importance, including reductions in locomotor ability. Little is known about how such changes in performance in individual animals are related to either mass loss during food deprivation or growth rate during re-feeding. This study followed changes in the maximum sprint swimming performance of individual European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, throughout 45 days of food deprivation and 30 days of re-feeding. Maximum sprint speed did not show a significant decline until 45 days of food deprivation. Among individuals, the reduction in sprinting speed at this time was not related to mass loss. After 30 days of re-feeding, mean sprinting speed had recovered to match that of control fish. Among individuals, however, maximum sprinting speed was negatively correlated with growth rate after the resumption of feeding. This suggests that the rapid compensatory growth that occurs during re-feeding after a prolonged fast carries a physiological cost in terms of reduced sprinting capacity, the extent of which shows continuous variation among individuals in relation to growth rate. The long-term repeatability of maximum sprint speed was low when fish were fasted or fed a maintenance ration, but was high among control fish fed to satiation. Fish that had been previously food deprived continued to show low repeatability in sprinting ability even after the initiation of ad libitum feeding, probably stemming from variation in compensatory growth among individuals and its associated negative effects on sprinting ability. Together, these results suggest that food limitation can disrupt hierarchies of maximum sprint performance within populations. In the wild, the cumulative effects on locomotor capacity of fasting and re-feeding could lead to variable survival among individuals with different growth trajectories following a period of food deprivation.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 601
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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Bonhommeau, S.; Giordano, N.; Ellul, S.; Ellul, G.; Deguara, S.; Wendling, B.; Belhaj, M.M.; Kerzerho, V.; Bernard, S.
Titre Tagging Atlantic bluefin tuna from a farming cage: An attempt to reduce handling times for large scale deployments Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research
Volume (down) 211 Numéro Pages 27-31
Mots-Clés Electronic tagging; Farming cage; Large Atlantic bluefin tuna; Release
Résumé Our knowledge on the biology and ecology of marine species have improved greatly through the use of archival tags by enabling the collection on information from individual in the wild. This is specifically true for large pelagic species such as the Atlantic Bluefin tuna (ABFT, Thunnus thynnus) where, for the first time, it has been possible to confirm through fisheries-independent data, migration patterns, reproductive and feeding behaviours and habitat use. However, large-scale tagging experiments that would enable researchers to tackle group behaviour are difficult to set up. On the one hand, the impact of the actual tagging operation should be as minimal as possible to avoid any change in behaviour of the fish which could influence tag data analyses. On the other hand, large scale tagging experiments require handling a large number of animals in a relatively short period of time. In the present manuscript, a methodology for tagging several large ABFT with satellite tags was tested with ABFT caught from a cage of a Maltese farm. The total time of the operation, from the moment fish were caught by handline to release back to the sea lasted an average of 10 min for the 3 fish tagged. The handling of the fish on the deck lasted less than 2 min. This methodology proved successful at tagging several large (158–182 cm) fishes in a very short time, while ensuring the best conditions for the fish during tagging and subsequent release. This procedure requires substantial logistical preparation and an experienced crew team but, by reducing the time required for the operation, opens up the possibility of large scale tagging activities of large fish held in cages or caught by purse seiners.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2487
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Auteur Iversen, N.K.; McKenzie, D.J.; Malte, H.; Wang, T.
Titre Reflex bradycardia does not influence oxygen consumption during hypoxia in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Comp. Physiol. B-Biochem. Syst. Environ. Physiol.
Volume (down) 180 Numéro 4 Pages 495-502
Mots-Clés Anguilla anguilla; Cardiac output; Critical oxygen tension; Hypoxic bradycardia; Oxygen; Teleost; atlantic cod; cardiac vagotomy; circulation; consumption; dogfish scyliorhinus-canicula; fish; heart-rate; rainbow-trout; responses; temperature; tolerance
Résumé Most teleost fish reduce heart rate when exposed to acute hypoxia. This hypoxic bradycardia has been characterised for many fish species, but it remains uncertain whether this reflex contributes to the maintenance of oxygen uptake in hypoxia. Here we describe the effects of inhibiting the bradycardia on oxygen consumption (MO(2)), standard metabolic rate (SMR) and the critical oxygen partial pressure for regulation of SMR in hypoxia (Pcrit) in European eels Anguilla anguilla (mean +/- A SEM mass 528 +/- A 36 g; n = 14). Eels were instrumented with a Transonic flow probe around the ventral aorta to measure cardiac output (Q) and heart rate (f (H)). MO(2) was then measured by intermittent closed respirometry during sequential exposure to various levels of increasing hypoxia, to determine Pcrit. Each fish was studied before and after abolition of reflex bradycardia by intraperitoneal injection of the muscarinic antagonist atropine (5 mg kg(-1)). In the untreated eels, f (H) fell from 39.0 +/- A 4.3 min(-1) in normoxia to 14.8 +/- A 5.2 min(-1) at the deepest level of hypoxia (2 kPa), and this was associated with a decline in Q, from 7.5 +/- A 0.8 mL min(-1) kg(-1) to 3.3 +/- A 0.7 mL min(-1) kg(-1) in normoxia versus deepest hypoxia, respectively. Atropine had no effect on SMR, which was 16.0 +/- A 1.8 mu mol O(2) kg(-1) min(-1) in control versus 16.8 +/- A 0.8 mu mol O(2) kg(-1) min(-1) following treatment with atropine. Atropine also had no significant effect on normoxic f (H) or Q in the eel, but completely abolished the bradycardia and associated decline in Q during progressive hypoxia. This pharmacological inhibition of the cardiac responses to hypoxia was, however, without affect on Pcrit, which was 11.7 +/- A 1.3 versus 12.5 +/- A 1.5 kPa in control versus atropinised eels, respectively. These results indicate, therefore, that reflex bradycardia does not contribute to maintenance of MO(2) and regulation of SMR by the European eel in hypoxia.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0174-1578 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 805
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Auteur Bourjea, J.; Clermont, S.; Delgado, A.; Murua, H.; Ruiz, J.; Ciccione, S.; Chavance, P.
Titre Marine turtle interaction with purse-seine fishery in the Atlantic and Indian oceans: Lessons for management Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation
Volume (down) 178 Numéro Pages 74-87
Mots-Clés Atlantic Ocean; Bycatch; Fishery impacts; fishery management; Indian Ocean; Marine turtle
Résumé Bycatch of endangered marine turtles is a growing issue for the management of all fisheries, including the oceanic purse-seine fishery. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial and temporal variation in bycatch rates of these species in the entire European purse-seine fishery operating in the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The study was based on data collected through observer programs from 1995 to 2011. During that period, a total of 15 913 fishing sets were observed, including 6 515 on Drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (DFADs) and 9 398 on free swimming schools, representing a global coverage of 10.3% and 5.1% of the total fishing activity in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively. Moreover, from 2003 to 2011, 14 124 specific observations were carried out on DFADs to check turtle entanglement in the net covering DFADs. We found that the purse-seine fishery has a very low impact on marine turtles. We estimated that the annual number of individuals incidentally captured was 218 (SD = 150) and 250 (SD = 157) in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively, with more than 75% being released alive. The present study also investigated the impact of DFADs; which is considered a key conservation issue for this fishery. Drifting objects may play a key role in aggregating juveniles of marine turtles, implying the need for improving their construction to avoid entanglement (e.g. avoiding nets in the structure); however, based on our study it is not the main source of incidental captures of marine turtles in this fishery.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 349
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Auteur Bodin, N.; Lesperance, D.; Albert, R.; Hollanda, S.; Michaud, P.; Degroote, M.; Churlaud, C.; Bustamante, P.
Titre Trace elements in oceanic pelagic communities in the western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Chemosphere
Volume (down) 174 Numéro Pages 354-362
Mots-Clés atlantic-ocean; blue marlin; Environmental risk assessment; makaira-nigricans; Marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mercury; mercury content; North Pacific; risk-assessment; Seafood; Selenium; swordfish xiphias-gladius; Tuna fisheries' bycatch
Résumé The mineral composition of target and non-target pelagic fish caught by purse-seiners and longliners in the western-central Indian Ocean was determined. From the 10 essential elements analysed, selenium and zinc showed the highest concentrations in swordfish and blue marlin while Indian mackerel appeared as a good source of copper, iron and chrome. All catch had levels of lead and cadmium, two toxic elements, below the maximum sanitary limits. Although some concerns were raised regarding mercury concentrations in the largest species (wahoo, swordfish and blue marlin), molar ratios of mercury and selenium indicate that all oceanic pelagic fish from the western-central Indian Ocean are safe for human consumption. This study also gives insights on the relationships between the levels of essential and toxic elements in fish muscle and the size, trophic position and diet sources of the studied pelagic species. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0045-6535 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2119
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