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Auteur Olson, R.J.; Young, J.W.; Menard, F.; Potier, M.; Allain, V.; Goni, N.; Logan, J.M.; Galvan-Magana, F.
Titre Bioenergetics, Trophic Ecology, and Niche Separation of Tunas Type Chapitre de livre
Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée
Volume Numéro Pages 199-344
Mots-Clés albacore thunnus-alalunga; atlantic bluefin tuna; eastern tropical pacific; fish aggregation devices; gulf-of-mexico; large pelagic fishes; oceanic top predators; predator-prey interactions; satellite archival tags; western indian-ocean
Résumé Tunas are highly specialized predators that have evolved numerous adaptations for a lifestyle that requires large amounts of energy consumption. Here we review our understanding of the bioenergetics and feeding dynamics of tunas on a global scale, with an emphasis on yellowfin, bigeye, skipjack, albacore, and Atlantic bluefin tunas. Food consumption balances bioenergetics expenditures for respiration, growth (including gonad production), specific dynamic action, egestion, and excretion. Tunas feed across the micronekton and some large zooplankton. Some tunas appear to time their life history to take advantage of ephemeral aggregations of crustacean, fish, and molluscan prey. Ontogenetic and spatial diet differences are substantial, and significant interdecadal changes in prey composition have been observed. Diet shifts from larger to smaller prey taxa highlight ecosystem-wide changes in prey availability and diversity and provide implications for changing bioenergetics requirements into the future. Where tunas overlap, we show evidence of niche separation between them; resources are divided largely by differences in diet percentages and size ranges of prey taxa. The lack of long-term data limits the ability to predict impacts of climate change on tuna feeding behaviour. We note the need for systematic collection of feeding data as part of routine monitoring of these species, and we highlight the advantages of using biochemical techniques for broad-scale analyses of trophic relations. We support the continued development of ecosystem models, which all too often lack the regional-specific trophic data needed to adequately investigate climate and fishing impacts.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Curry, B.E.
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Advances in Marine Biology, Vol 74
Volume de collection 74 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-803607-5 Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1661
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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Ménard, F.; Cazelles, B.; Briand, K.; Pianet, R.; Planque, B.; Stenseth, N.C.
Titre Complex interplays among population dynamics, environmental forcing, and exploitation in fisheries Type Article scientifique
Année 2008 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Pnas
Volume 105 Numéro 14 Pages 5420-5425
Mots-Clés Atlantic tuna; North Atlantic Oscillation; time-series analysis
Résumé The patterns of variations in fisheries time series are known to result from a complex combination of species and fisheries dynamics all coupled with environmental forcing (including climate, trophic interactions, etc.). Disentangling the relative effects of these factors has been a major goal of fisheries science for both conceptual and management reasons. By examining the variability of 169 tuna and billfish time series of catch and catch per unit effort (CPUE) throughout the Atlantic as well as their linkage to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), we find that the importance of these factors differed according to the spatial scale. At the scale of the entire Atlantic the patterns of variations are primarily spatially structured, whereas at a more regional scale the patterns of variations were primarily related to the fishing gear. Furthermore, the NAO appeared to also structure the patterns of variations of tuna time series, especially over the North Atlantic. We conclude that the patterns of variations in fisheries time series of tuna and billfish only poorly reflect the underlying dynamics of these fish populations; they appear to be shaped by several successive embedded processes, each interacting with each other. Our results emphasize the necessity for scientific data when investigating the population dynamics of large pelagic fishes, because CPUE fluctuations are not directly attributable to change in species' abundance.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0027-8424, 1091-6490 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1669
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Auteur Rodde, C.; de Verdal, H.; Lefebvre, S.; Menniti, C.; Vandeputte, M.; Clota, F.; Allal, F.; McKenzie, D.J.; Benzie, J.A.H.; Nahon, S.
Titre Variations in isotope incorporation rates and trophic discrimination factors of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in scales from three European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) populations Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol.
Volume 533 Numéro Pages 151468
Mots-Clés atlantic salmon; body-size; delta-c-13; delta-n-15; dietary; fish; Fish; fractionation; growth; Metabolic pathway; Mixing model,non-lethal sampling; Time-dependant model; tissue; turnover rates
Résumé Carbon (delta C-13) and nitrogen (delta N-15) stable isotope analyses are used in marine ecology to study trophic relationships and migrations of species since they reflect dietary sources consumed which may vary geographically. However, better estimations of isotope incorporation rates and trophic discrimination factors (TDF) under controlled conditions are required. Moreover, variability of isotope incorporation rates and TDF among and within populations has been poorly described, especially in fish scales, whereas the use of non-lethal method is becoming a standard. This study aimed to experimentally assess whether carbon and nitrogen isotope incorporation rates (lambda C and lambda N, respectively) and TDF of scales vary in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) among (1) Atlantic, West Mediterranean and East Mediterranean populations, (2) sexes and (3) individuals. Fish were reared under controlled conditions and switched from a diet 1 to a diet 2 with different delta C-13 and delta N-15 values. Scales were sampled repeatedly on 16 fish within the three populations, from the day of diet change (day 0) to the end of the experiment (day 217). Isotope incorporation rates of scales and TDF were determined using a time-dependent model. Isotopic carbon and nitrogen half-lives (t(50)C and t(50)N) were similar among the three populations but males had significantly lower t(50)C and t(50)N than females (29 +/- 2 and 35 +/- 2 days vs. 53 +/- 7 and 80 +/- 11 days, respectively). Females had higher growth rates but lower catabolic rates than males. Variability of lambda C . and lambda N was large within sexes: t(50)C ranged from 17 to 159 days and t(50)N ranged from 18 to 342 days among individuals. Thus, variability between sexes and among individuals must be considered to avoid misinterpretation in field-based studies. For the 48 fish, TDF were 4.91 +/- 0.03 and 2.46 +/- 0.06 parts per thousand for carbon and nitrogen, respectively, and similar between sexes and among populations. Besides, TDF varied among individuals from 2.95 to 5.59 parts per thousand and from 0.93 to 3.55 parts per thousand for carbon and nitrogen, respectively. Empirical mixing models were run to estimate how different TDF influenced estimation of the contributions of food sources to diet of their consumer. The output differed considerably when using TDF from fish literature or those estimated herein, which confirms that a tissue-specific TDF must be used to avoid misinterpretation in field-based studies. Individual variation in TDF did not, however, influence estimation of the contributions of food sources, confirming that scales are a valid tissue for non-lethal sampling.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000588286500006 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2950
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Auteur Brophy, D.; Haynes, P.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Fraile, I.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Garibaldi, F.; Katavic, I.; Tinti, F.; Karakulak, F.S.; Macias, D.; Busawon, D.; Hanke, A.; Kimoto, A.; Sakai, O.; Deguara, S.; Abid, N.; Santos, M.N.
Titre Otolith shape variation provides a marker of stock origin for north Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Mar. Freshw. Res.
Volume 67 Numéro 7 Pages 1023-1036
Mots-Clés carrying-capacity; elliptical Fourier analysis; fish; holistic approach; identification; management; Mediterranean Sea; mitochondrial-dna; population structure; population-structure; spatial structure; stock mixture analysis; western atlantic
Résumé Two stocks of bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) inhabit the north Atlantic; the western and eastern stocks spawn in the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean Sea respectively. Trans-Atlantic movements occur outside spawning time whereas natal homing maintains stock structure. Commercial fisheries may exploit a mixed assemblage of both stocks. The incorporation of mixing rates into stock assessment is precluded by uncertainties surrounding stock discrimination. Otolith shape descriptors were used to characterise western and eastern stocks of Atlantic bluefin tuna in the present study and to estimate stock composition in catches of unknown origin. Otolith shape varied with length and between locations and years. Within a restricted size range (200-297-cm fork length (FL)) the two stocks were distinguished with an accuracy of 83%. Bayesian stock mixture analysis indicated that samples from the east Atlantic and Mediterranean were predominantly of eastern origin. The proportion assigned to the eastern stock showed slight spatial variation; however, overlapping 95% credible intervals indicated no significant difference (200-297 cm FL: central Atlantic, 73-100%; Straits of Gibraltar, 73-100%; Morocco, 50-99%; Portugal 64-100%). Otolith shape could be used in combination with other population markers to improve the accuracy of mixing rate estimates for Atlantic bluefin tuna.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1323-1650 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1681
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Auteur Dossa, A.N.; Silva, A.C.; Chaigneau, A.; Eldin, G.; Araujo, M.; Bertrand, A.
Titre Near-surface western boundary circulation off Northeast Brazil Type Article scientifique
Année 2021 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.
Volume 190 Numéro Pages 102475
Mots-Clés adcp; currents; flow; Flow-topography interaction; Mesoscale activity; North Brazil Current; North Brazil Undercurrent; ocean; south-atlantic; thermocline; tropical atlantic; upper-layer; Western Tropical Atlantic
Résumé In the tropical Atlantic Ocean, the North Brazil Undercurrent (NBUC) and the North Brazil Current (NBC) play important roles as near-surface northward paths for the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. To investigate the meridional evolution of the near-surface western boundary circulation in that region, two surveys were carried out off Northeast Brazil during austral spring 2015 and fall 2017, periods that we show to be representative of typical conditions for the spring and fall seasons. Using conductivity temperature depth oxygen probe and ship-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements, altimetry data, and numerical reanalysis products, we examine the spatiotemporal variability of the NBUC, providing a comprehensive view of the circulation, including NBUC-NBC transition and the potential impact of mesoscale eddies. The NBUC originating south of 10 degrees S flows equatorward over the continental slope. NBUC mean velocity, transport and vertical extent of the velocity core were higher in spring 2015 (0.81 m s(-1), 15.6 Sv, and >400 m) than in fall 2017 (0.65 m s(-1), 11.0 Sv, and similar to 300 m). The upper limit of the NBUC velocity core rose slightly from 160 m at 9 degrees S to 105 m depth at 6 degrees S. This pattern is associated with a northward increase in current velocity from 0.7 m s(-1) at 9 degrees S to 1 m s(-1) at 5 degrees S. The orographic effect shifts the flow from northeastward south of 7.5 degrees S to northwestward north of 7.5 degrees S, following the shoreline. Besides, altimetry data show that this flow can be locally influenced by mesoscale activity. Farther north, at similar to 4.8 degrees S, data obtained in fall 2017 show that the central branch of the South Equatorial Current (cSEC) enters into the western boundary system where it coalesces with the NBUC to form the NBC, flowing toward the Caribbean Sea. Finally, in fall, the NBUC retroflection does not feed the South Equatorial Undercurrent (SEUC), which, instead originates from retroflections of the cSEC and the equatorial branch of the South Equatorial Current (eSEC).
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000604185400001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2962
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