|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur Perry, C.T.; Alvarez-Filip, L.; Graham, N.A.J.; Mumby, P.J.; Wilson, S.K.; Kench, P.S.; Manzello, D.P.; Morgan, K.M.; Slangen, A.B.A.; Thomson, D.P.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Smithers, S.G.; Steneck, R.S.; Carlton, R.; Edinger, E.N.; Enochs, I.C.; Estrada-Saldivar, N.; Haywood, M.D.E.; Kolodziej, G.; Murphy, G.N.; Perez-Cervantes, E.; Suchley, A.; Valentino, L.; Boenish, R.; Wilson, M.; Macdonald, C.
Titre Loss of coral reef growth capacity to track future increases in sea level Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Nature
Volume 558 Numéro 7710 Pages 396-+
Mots-Clés atlantic; atoll; bioerosion; calcium-carbonate; carbonate production; climate-change; islands; ocean; patterns; rise
Résumé Sea-level rise (SLR) is predicted to elevate water depths above coral reefs and to increase coastal wave exposure as ecological degradation limits vertical reef growth, but projections lack data on interactions between local rates of reef growth and sea level rise. Here we calculate the vertical growth potential of more than 200 tropical western Atlantic and Indian Ocean reefs, and compare these against recent and projected rates of SLR under different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. Although many reefs retain accretion rates close to recent SLR trends, few will have the capacity to track SLR projections under RCP4.5 scenarios without sustained ecological recovery, and under RCP8.5 scenarios most reefs are predicted to experience mean water depth increases of more than 0.5 m by 2100. Coral cover strongly predicts reef capacity to track SLR, but threshold cover levels that will be necessary to prevent submergence are well above those observed on most reefs. Urgent action is thus needed to mitigate climate, sea-level and future ecological changes in order to limit the magnitude of future reef submergence.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2378
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Keller, S.; Quetglas, A.; Puerta, P.; Bitetto, I.; Casciaro, L.; Cuccu, D.; Esteban, A.; Garcia, C.; Garofalo, G.; Guijarro, B.; Josephides, M.; Jadaud, A.; Lefkaditou, E.; Maiorano, P.; Manfredi, C.; Marceta, B.; Micallef, R.; Peristeraki, P.; Relini, G.; Sartor, P.; Spedicato, M.T.; Tserpes, G.; Hidalgo, M.
Titre Environmentally driven synchronies of Mediterranean cephalopod populations Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.
Volume 152 Numéro Pages 1-14
Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; balearic sea; Cephalopods; Dynamic factor analysis; ecological niche approach; fisheries; fluctuations; hake merluccius-merluccius; Illex coindetii; life-history; Mediterranean; medits; octopus; Octopus vulgaris; squid; Synchrony; time-series
Résumé The Mediterranean Sea is characterized by large scale gradients of temperature, productivity and salinity, in addition to pronounced mesoscale differences. Such a heterogeneous system is expected to shape the population dynamics of marine species. On the other hand, prevailing environmental and climatic conditions at whole basin scale may force spatially distant populations to fluctuate in synchrony. Cephalopods are excellent case studies to test these hypotheses owing to their high sensitivity to environmental conditions. Data of two cephalopod species with contrasting life histories (benthic octopus vs nectobenthic squid), obtained from scientific surveys carried out throughout the Mediterranean during the last 20 years were analyzed. The objectives of this study and the methods used to achieve them (in parentheses) were: (i) to investigate synchronies in spatially separated populations (decorrelation analysis); (ii) detect underlying common abundance trends over distant regions (dynamic factor analysis, DFA); and (iii) analyse putative influences of key environmental drivers such as productivity and sea surface temperature on the population dynamics at regional scale (general linear models, GLM). In accordance with their contrasting spatial mobility, the distance from where synchrony could no longer be detected (decorrelation scale) was higher in squid than in octopus (349 vs 217 km); for comparison, the maximum distance between locations was 2620 km. The DFA revealed a general increasing trend in the abundance of both species in most areas, which agrees with the already reported worldwide proliferation of cephalopods. DFA results also showed that population dynamics are more similar in the eastern than in the western Mediterranean basin. According to the GLM models, cephalopod populations were negatively affected by productivity, which would be explained by an increase of competition and predation by fishes. While warmer years coincided with declining octopus numbers, areas of high sea surface temperature showed higher densities of squid. Our results are relevant for regional fisheries management and demonstrate that the regionalisation objectives envisaged under the new Common Fishery Policy may not be adequate for Mediterranean cephalopod stocks. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2132
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Kostecki, C.; Loc'h, F.L.; Roussel, J.M.; Desroy, N.; Huteau, D.; Riera, P.; Bris, H.L.; Pape, O.L.
Titre Dynamics of an estuarine nursery ground : the spatio-temporal relationship between the river flow and the food web of the juvenile common sole (Solea solea, L.) as revealed by stable isotopes analysis Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Journal of Sea Research
Volume 64 Numéro Pages 54-60
Mots-Clés Atlantic; Common; Eastern; Estuarine; Food; Grounds; isotopes; juvenile; nursery; Sole; stable; web
Résumé Estuaries are essential fish habitats because they provide nursery grounds for a number of marine species. Previous studies in the Bay of Vilaine (part of the Bay of Biscay, France) have underlined the estuarine dependence of juvenile common sole (Solea solea, L) and shown that the extent of sole nursery grounds was positively influenced by the variability of the river flow. In the present study, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes were used to describe the trophic network until the young-of-the-year sole and to compare interannual variations in the dominant trophic pathways in the sole nursery areas in this bay. Particulate organic matter (POM), sediment organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos, benthic invertebrate sole prey and young-of-the-year common sole were collected during the summer over 4 years characterised by contrasting river discharges. POM isotopic signatures were used to identify the origins of nutrient and organic matter assimilated into the estuarine food web through benthic organisms to juvenile common sole. Interannual spatial variations were found in the POM carbon stable isotope signatures, with the importance of these variations depending on the interannual fluctuations of the river flow. Moreover, the spatio-temporal variability of this POM isotopic signature was propagated along the food webs up to juvenile sole, confirming the central role of river discharge and terrigeneous subsidy input in the estuarine benthic food web in determining the size of the sole nursery habitat.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1385-1101 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 85
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Sebastian, M.; Smith, A.F.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Fredricks, H.F.; Van Mooy, B.; Koblizek, M.; Brandsma, J.; Koster, G.; Mestre, M.; Mostajir, B.; Pitta, P.; Postle, A.D.; Sanchez, P.; Gasol, J.M.; Scanlan, D.J.; Chen, Y.
Titre Lipid remodelling is a widespread strategy in marine heterotrophic bacteria upon phosphorus deficiency Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Isme J.
Volume 10 Numéro 4 Pages 968-978
Mots-Clés 2 enzymes; agrobacterium-tumefaciens; bacterioplankton groups; Ecology; Mediterranean Sea; mesocosm experiment; microbial food-web; north-atlantic ocean; nutrient limitation; phosphate starvation
Résumé Upon phosphorus (P) deficiency, marine phytoplankton reduce their requirements for P by replacing membrane phospholipids with alternative non-phosphorus lipids. It was very recently demonstrated that a SAR11 isolate also shares this capability when phosphate starved in culture. Yet, the extent to which this process occurs in other marine heterotrophic bacteria and in the natural environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the substitution of membrane phospholipids for a variety of non-phosphorus lipids is a conserved response to P deficiency among phylogenetically diverse marine heterotrophic bacteria, including members of the Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. By deletion mutagenesis and complementation in the model marine bacterium Phaeobacter sp. MED193 and heterologous expression in recombinant Escherichia coli, we confirm the roles of a phospholipase C (PlcP) and a glycosyltransferase in lipid remodelling. Analyses of the Global Ocean Sampling and Tara Oceans metagenome data sets demonstrate that PlcP is particularly abundant in areas characterized by low phosphate concentrations. Furthermore, we show that lipid remodelling occurs seasonally and responds to changing nutrient conditions in natural microbial communities from the Mediterranean Sea. Together, our results point to the key role of lipid substitution as an adaptive strategy enabling heterotrophic bacteria to thrive in the vast P-depleted areas of the ocean.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1624
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Killen, S.S.; Marras, S.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre Fast growers sprint slower: effects of food deprivation and re-feeding on sprint swimming performance in individual juvenile European sea bass Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication (down) Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology
Volume 217 Numéro 6 Pages 859-865
Mots-Clés Compensatory growth; Ecophysiology; Food deprivation; Foraging; Locomotion; atlantic; catch-up growth; cod; dicentrarchus-labrax; ecological performance; gadus-morhua; long-term starvation; metabolic responses; salmon; teleost fish; trade-off; trade-offs; trout oncorhynchus-mykiss
Résumé While many ectothermic species can withstand prolonged fasting without mortality, food deprivation may have sublethal effects of ecological importance, including reductions in locomotor ability. Little is known about how such changes in performance in individual animals are related to either mass loss during food deprivation or growth rate during re-feeding. This study followed changes in the maximum sprint swimming performance of individual European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, throughout 45 days of food deprivation and 30 days of re-feeding. Maximum sprint speed did not show a significant decline until 45 days of food deprivation. Among individuals, the reduction in sprinting speed at this time was not related to mass loss. After 30 days of re-feeding, mean sprinting speed had recovered to match that of control fish. Among individuals, however, maximum sprinting speed was negatively correlated with growth rate after the resumption of feeding. This suggests that the rapid compensatory growth that occurs during re-feeding after a prolonged fast carries a physiological cost in terms of reduced sprinting capacity, the extent of which shows continuous variation among individuals in relation to growth rate. The long-term repeatability of maximum sprint speed was low when fish were fasted or fed a maintenance ration, but was high among control fish fed to satiation. Fish that had been previously food deprived continued to show low repeatability in sprinting ability even after the initiation of ad libitum feeding, probably stemming from variation in compensatory growth among individuals and its associated negative effects on sprinting ability. Together, these results suggest that food limitation can disrupt hierarchies of maximum sprint performance within populations. In the wild, the cumulative effects on locomotor capacity of fasting and re-feeding could lead to variable survival among individuals with different growth trajectories following a period of food deprivation.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 601
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement