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Auteur (up) Arnaud-Haond, S.; van den Beld, I.M.J.; Becheler, R.; Orejas, C.; Menot, L.; Frank, N.; Grehan, A.; Bourillet, J.F.
Titre Two “pillars” of cold-water coral reefs along Atlantic European margins: Prevalent association of Madrepora oculata with Lophelia pertusa, from reef to colony scale Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 145 Numéro Pages 110-119
Mots-Clés community; bay; Bay of Biscay; Lophelia pertusa; Madrepora oculata; biscay; mediterranean sea; Cold water corals (CWC); deep-sea corals; False-chimaera colonies; fleuve manche; hydrodynamics; Iceland; Ireland; megafauna; mid-norway; ne atlantic
Résumé The scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa has been the focus of deep-sea research since the recognition of the vast extent of coral reefs in North Atlantic waters two decades ago, long after their existence was mentioned by fishermen. These reefs where shown to provide habitat, concentrate biomass and act as feeding or nursery grounds for many species, including those targeted by commercial fisheries. Thus, the attention given to this cold-water coral (CWC) species from researchers and the wider public has increased. Consequently, new research programs triggered research to determine the full extent of the corals geographic distribution and ecological dynamics of “Lophelia reefs”. The present study is based on a systematic standardised sampling design to analyze the distribution and coverage of CWC reefs along European margins from the Bay of Biscay to Iceland. Based on Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) image analysis, we report an almost systematic occurrence of Madrepora oculata in association with L. pertusa with similar abundances of both species within explored reefs, despite a tendency of increased abundance of L. pertusa compared to M. oculata toward higher latitudes. This systematic association occasionally reached the colony scale, with “twin” colonies of both species often observed growing next to each other when isolated structures were occurring offireefs. Finally, several “false chimaera” were observed within reefs, confirming that colonial structures can be “coral bushes” formed by an accumulation of multiple colonies even at the inter-specific scale, with no need for self-recognition mechanisms. Thus, we underline the importance of the hitherto underexplored M. oculata in the Eastern Atlantic, reestablishing a more balanced view that both species and their yet unknown interactions are required to better elucidate the ecology, dynamics and fate of European CWC reefs in a changing environment.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2256
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Auteur (up) Benazzouz, A.; Pelegri, J.L.; Demarcq, H.; Machin, F.; Mason, E.; Orbi, A.; Pena-Izquierdo, J.; Soumia, M.
Titre On the temporal memory of coastal upwelling off NW Africa Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans
Volume 119 Numéro 9 Pages 6356-6380
Mots-Clés atlantic; Canary Current; cape blanc region; circulation; Coastal upwelling; eastern boundary; Ekman transport; interannual variability; northwest africa; NW Africa; sea-surface temperature; SST difference; system; temporal memory; water
Résumé We use a combination of satellite, in situ, and numerical data to provide a comprehensive view of the seasonal coastal upwelling cycle off NW Africa in terms of both wind forcing and sea surface temperature (SST) response. Wind forcing is expressed in terms of both instantaneous (local) and time-integrated (nonlocal) indices, and the ocean response is expressed as the SST difference between coastal and offshore waters. The classical local index, the cross-shore Ekman transport, reproduces reasonably well the time-latitude distribution of SST differences but with significant time lags at latitudes higher than Cape Blanc. Two nonlocal indices are examined. One of them, a cumulative index calculated as the backward averaged Ekman transport that provides the highest correlation with SST differences, reproduces well the timing of the SST differences at all latitudes (except near Cape Blanc). The corresponding time lags are close to zero south of Cape Blanc and range between 2 and 4 months at latitudes between Cape Blanc and the southern Gulf of Cadiz. The results are interpreted based on calculations of spatial and temporal auto and cross correlations for wind forcing and SST differences. At temporal scales of 2-3 weeks, the alongshore advection of alongshore momentum compensates for interfacial friction, allowing the upwelling jet and associated frontal system to remain active. We conclude that the coastal jet plays a key role in maintaining the structure of coastal upwelling, even at times of relaxed winds, by introducing a seasonal memory to the system in accordance with the atmospheric-forcing annual cycle.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1194
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Auteur (up) Bender, M.G.; Pie, M.R.; Rezende, E.L.; Mouillot, D.; Floeter, S.R.
Titre Biogeographic, historical and environmental influences on the taxonomic and functional structure of Atlantic reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography
Volume 22 Numéro 11 Pages 1173-1182
Mots-Clés Assemblage structuring; Atlantic Ocean; Body size; functional group; reef fish; taxonomic structure
Résumé Aim To disentangle how historic, biogeographic and environmental factors have shaped the composition of different reef fish assemblages, we analysed assemblage structure from a taxonomic (proportions of species from different families) and functional perspective (diet and body size). Location Atlantic Ocean. Methods The distributions of 1629 fish species were compiled for 31 locations across the Atlantic Ocean (39°66′ N, 27°50′ S). These locations provide a richness gradient ranging from 54 species in St Paul's Rocks to 474 in Cuba. We used cluster analyses to assess how historical and biogeographic factors have shaped the taxonomic and functional structure (i.e. the distribution of species within families, diet and body size groups) of assemblages. We then employed a constrained analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) to test the relative influence of the distance from the biodiversity centre in the Atlantic, sea surface temperature, isolation, coral species richness and area, and coastal length on the observed patterns of assemblage structure. Results The taxonomic and functional structure of reef fish assemblages across the Atlantic exhibits a biogeographic fingerprint, with a marked discrimination between species-rich biogenic reefs (concentrated primarily in the Caribbean and composed of small species feeding on invertebrates) and poorer peripheral regions dominated by larger species with more diverse diets. The first CAP axis explains 87% of body size distribution in assemblages, showing that the effects of sea surface temperature and coral richness and those of isolation are antagonistic and can be embedded into a single dimension. Environmental factors, such as temperature and habitat complexity, explain the disproportionate number of small species in the Caribbean, whereas in the remaining regions the predominance of large-bodied fish increases with isolation due to high dispersal ability. Main conclusions We found that historical events, which have shaped the biogeography of reef fishes, and environmental characteristics (coral reefs versus periphery) have both played a role in structuring the taxonomic and functional components of Atlantic fish assemblages.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 456
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Auteur (up) Benedetti, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Adloff, F.; Ayata, S.-D.
Titre Investigating uncertainties in zooplankton composition shifts under climate change scenarios in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 41 Numéro 2 Pages 345-360
Mots-Clés marine biodiversity; species distribution models; north-atlantic; beta diversity; calanoid copepods; ecological-niche; envelope models; habitat-suitability; mass mortality; pseudo-absence data
Résumé Ensemble niche modelling has become a common framework to predict changes in assemblages composition under climate change scenarios. The amount of uncertainty generated by the different components of this framework has rarely been assessed. In the marine realm forecasts have usually focused on taxa representing the top of the marine food-web, thus overlooking their basal component: the plankton. Calibrating environmental niche models at the global scale, we modelled the habitat suitability of 106 copepod species and estimated the dissimilarity between present and future zooplanktonic assemblages in the surface Mediterranean Sea. We identified the patterns (species replacement versus nestedness) driving the predicted dissimilarity, and quantified the relative contributions of different uncertainty sources: environmental niche models, greenhouse gas emission scenarios, circulation model configurations and species prevalence. Our results confirm that the choice of the niche modelling method is the greatest source of uncertainty in habitat suitability projections. Presence-only and presence-absence methods provided different visions of the niches, which subsequently lead to different future scenarios of biodiversity changes. Nestedness with decline in species richness is the pattern driving dissimilarity between present and future copepod assemblages. Our projections contrast with those reported for higher trophic levels, suggesting that different components of the pelagic food-web may respond discordantly to future climatic changes.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2282
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Auteur (up) Benedetti, F.; Vogt, M.; Righetti, D.; Guilhaumon, F.; Ayata, S.-D.
Titre Do functional groups of planktonic copepods differ in their ecological niches? Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 45 Numéro 3 Pages 604-616
Mots-Clés climate-change; copepods; species distribution models; north-atlantic; calanus-finmarchicus; mediterranean sea; environmental niche; functional groups; lipid pump; marine ecosystem; oithona-similis; pseudo-absences; trait biogeography; zooplankton; zooplankton fecal pellets
Résumé Aim: To assess the degree of overlap between the environmental niches of marine planktonic copepods and test if the distribution of copepod functional groups differs across environmental gradients. Location: The Mediterranean Sea. Methods: Functional groups were defined based on clustering of functional traits in 106 marine copepod species using a multivariate ordination analysis. Functional traits included maximum body length, feeding mode, spawning strategy and trophic group. Simultaneously, the global distribution of the species was used to model their environmental niches with six environmental variables. For each of these predictors, four niche parameters were derived from the univariate response curve of each species to summarise their environmental preferences and ordinate the species in niche space through a PCA. Finally, the differences in the position in niche space of functional groups were tested with variance analysis. Results: We identified seven copepod functional groups with different distributions along the environmental gradients covered by our study. While carnivorous functional groups were affiliated with oligotrophic and tropical conditions, large and small current-feeding herbivores are associated with colder, more seasonally varying and productive conditions. Small cruising detritivores and other small current-feeding herbivores were not affiliated with specific conditions as their constituting species were scattered in niche space. Main conclusions: Since copepod functional groups occupy distinct ecological niches, ecosystem processes related to these groups are expected to vary across environmental gradients. Conditions favouring large current-feeding herbivores should allow for enhanced fluxes of energy and nutrients through Mediterranean Sea ecosystems, while such fluxes should be weakened where large carnivores and small passive ambush-feeding copepods dominate. Our study supports the development of trait-based zooplankton functional groups in marine ecosystem models.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
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Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2311
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